Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Bruegmann
IN THE NEWS

Robert Bruegmann

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
AT first glance, Robert Bruegmann -- a childless academic whose modernist apartment building sits in a dense, upscale Chicago neighborhood -- seems like the kind of guy who'd hate the suburbs. His peers and predecessors have, for decades, decried the unplanned, low-density, auto-dependent growth of shopping malls and subdivisions. But he's emerging as the unlikely champion of what we've called, at least since the 1950s, "sprawl."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
AT first glance, Robert Bruegmann -- a childless academic whose modernist apartment building sits in a dense, upscale Chicago neighborhood -- seems like the kind of guy who'd hate the suburbs. His peers and predecessors have, for decades, decried the unplanned, low-density, auto-dependent growth of shopping malls and subdivisions. But he's emerging as the unlikely champion of what we've called, at least since the 1950s, "sprawl."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2006 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Still no word on whether a stitch in time really does save nine, but a UC Irvine professor has uncovered evidence to support another famous proverb, "Good fences make good neighbors." In a study of 15,000 Americans, economist Jan Brueckner found that suburban living is better for people's social life than city dwelling. The less crowded a neighborhood is, the friendlier its residents become, the report says.
OPINION
July 13, 2006
Re "What gridlock?" Current, July 9 Robert Bruegmann is ingenuous -- or disingenuous -- in focusing on people's self-interest in suburbia. He should know that what makes people happy is not always good in the long term. By fleeing the cultural difference of the urban polis, people forget about their connection with their fellow humans and thus become inured to human suffering. Less than a year after the nation learned of New Orleans' stunning poverty, there is no political will to try to combat poverty.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2006 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
This is the biggest, fastest-growing master-planned community in the nation. And, quite possibly, the most insulted. "The ugliest and most embarrassing feature of the Front Range," a resident of nearby Denver declared in a letter to the Rocky Mountain News. "One big smush of beige puke," a Denver councilwoman sneered to Westword, an alternative weekly. And from a post on Cyburbia.org, a forum for urban planners: "Highlands Ranch represents the nexus of all that is soulless and evil in the world."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
'Tis the season, or so the media would have us believe, to be green. Al Gore is preaching the gospel of sustainability in multiplexes across the country. Elle and Vanity Fair magazines published dueling green issues this spring. And tonight, a six-part series on sustainable architecture and design -- it's officially called "Design e2: The Economies of Being Environmentally Conscious" -- begins on PBS.
OPINION
June 27, 2004 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He is the author of "The City: A Global History," to be published by Modern Library.
The much-ballyhooed urban revival, at least in advanced countries, is actually a subtle shift in the role of cities. For most of history, they represented what is permanent and solid -- the sacred place, the citadel of power, the center of commerce. Today, they are increasingly a place of transient values, where people sojourn for a time of their life, or part time, but where they don't grow up or spend much of their lives. The fashionable and faddish, not the enduring and faithful, are king.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|