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Robert Brustein

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September 20, 1987 | Vincent Curcio
"Who Needs Theatre?" is a collection of essays written between 1980 and 1986 by Robert Brustein, drama critic of The New Republic and artistic director of the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard. Learning, intelligence and a passionate commitment to the theater are everywhere apparent in these pages. But curious to say of such a devotee as Brustein, his essays are of the greatest value when he is most detached in his approach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1997
The article on "Shlemiel the First" writer-director Robert Brustein called Chelm a "fictional village" in Poland ("Not Just Any Old 'Shlemiel,' " by Jan Breslauer, May 4). Chelm is a very real city that exists today, about 150 miles southeast of Warsaw, in the province of Lubin. In Yiddish literature and humor, inhabitants of Chelm were always considered fools and simpletons. In fact, that's what Chelm is known for. It could be said that a major export of that city has been its colorful and humorous literary characters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1997
The article on "Shlemiel the First" writer-director Robert Brustein called Chelm a "fictional village" in Poland ("Not Just Any Old 'Shlemiel,' " by Jan Breslauer, May 4). Chelm is a very real city that exists today, about 150 miles southeast of Warsaw, in the province of Lubin. In Yiddish literature and humor, inhabitants of Chelm were always considered fools and simpletons. In fact, that's what Chelm is known for. It could be said that a major export of that city has been its colorful and humorous literary characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
As a playwright, actor, director, teacher, artistic director, critic and author of 11 books, Robert Brustein for three decades has been one of the most versatile men in the American theater. He also is one of the most influential--and controversial.
BOOKS
September 27, 1987 | Vincent Curcio
WHO NEEDS THEATRE? by Robert Brustein (Atlantic Monthly Press: $18.95; 336 pp.). "Who Needs Theatre?" is a collection of essays written between 1980 and 1986 by Robert Brustein, drama critic of The New Republic and artistic director of the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard. Learning, intelligence and a passionate commitment to the theater are everywhere apparent in these pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997
Though it may seem as if the November sweeps just ended, TV watchers should brace themselves for the February ratings survey, which begins Thursday. The networks once again offer novel casting stunts (the "sweathogs" from "Welcome Back, Kotter" appear on NBC's "Mr. Rhodes"--except for the guy who played Vinnie Barbarino, who's doing something else these days), series milestones (would you believe "Married . . . With Children's" 250th episode?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN
There's nothing better for the theater's intellectual health than a scandal--of the proper sort. Not the sleazy kind where Miss Z is arrested for using controlled substances, or where Mr. Y has to explain what he did with the grant money. I mean an old-fashioned artistic cause celebre , where the onlooker is forced to do some hard thinking about the principles at issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1992 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Critics are not accountable," says Robert Brustein. "We want an exchange between the artist and the critic where they can talk about mutual problems and mutual resentments." Brustein was describing this weekend's "Critics & Criticism Conference," a series of panel discussions co-sponsored by Brustein's American Repertory Theatre and the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University. The conference's purpose is to examine what Brustein perceives to be a "crisis in criticism."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1997 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the audience jostled its way into New York's Town Hall on Monday night to hear playwright August Wilson debate critic Robert Brustein on the topic of multiculturalism in today's theater, a woman was overheard saying, "If you ask me, this isn't about race and theater in America at all. It's about what Madeleine Albright called cojones."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
As a playwright, actor, director, teacher, artistic director, critic and author of 11 books, Robert Brustein for three decades has been one of the most versatile men in the American theater. He also is one of the most influential--and controversial.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1997 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the audience jostled its way into New York's Town Hall on Monday night to hear playwright August Wilson debate critic Robert Brustein on the topic of multiculturalism in today's theater, a woman was overheard saying, "If you ask me, this isn't about race and theater in America at all. It's about what Madeleine Albright called cojones."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997
Though it may seem as if the November sweeps just ended, TV watchers should brace themselves for the February ratings survey, which begins Thursday. The networks once again offer novel casting stunts (the "sweathogs" from "Welcome Back, Kotter" appear on NBC's "Mr. Rhodes"--except for the guy who played Vinnie Barbarino, who's doing something else these days), series milestones (would you believe "Married . . . With Children's" 250th episode?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1992 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Critics are not accountable," says Robert Brustein. "We want an exchange between the artist and the critic where they can talk about mutual problems and mutual resentments." Brustein was describing this weekend's "Critics & Criticism Conference," a series of panel discussions co-sponsored by Brustein's American Repertory Theatre and the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University. The conference's purpose is to examine what Brustein perceives to be a "crisis in criticism."
BOOKS
September 27, 1987 | Vincent Curcio
WHO NEEDS THEATRE? by Robert Brustein (Atlantic Monthly Press: $18.95; 336 pp.). "Who Needs Theatre?" is a collection of essays written between 1980 and 1986 by Robert Brustein, drama critic of The New Republic and artistic director of the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard. Learning, intelligence and a passionate commitment to the theater are everywhere apparent in these pages.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Vincent Curcio
"Who Needs Theatre?" is a collection of essays written between 1980 and 1986 by Robert Brustein, drama critic of The New Republic and artistic director of the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard. Learning, intelligence and a passionate commitment to the theater are everywhere apparent in these pages. But curious to say of such a devotee as Brustein, his essays are of the greatest value when he is most detached in his approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN
There's nothing better for the theater's intellectual health than a scandal--of the proper sort. Not the sleazy kind where Miss Z is arrested for using controlled substances, or where Mr. Y has to explain what he did with the grant money. I mean an old-fashioned artistic cause celebre , where the onlooker is forced to do some hard thinking about the principles at issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1998
What's happening the next few weeks: * At the Museum of Fine Arts Sunday-Dec. 27: "Monet in the 20th Century," the first exhibition to focus exclusively on Monet's style during the opening decades of the 20th century. Boston is the exhibition's only U.S. venue. 465 Huntington Ave. (617) 267-9300. * Sept. 18-Oct. 10: The American Repertory Theatre's production of "How I Learned to Drive," the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Paula Vogel, starring Debra Winger. Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
Ever since its original Broadway production in the late '30s, "You Can't Take It With You," by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, has been part of the amateur theatrical cano n. The Pasadena Playhouse offered it, for example, during an all-Kaufman season in 1941. The Laguna Playhouse did it in 1966.
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