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April 15, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Attending a concert by Scottish singer Jean Redpath is like sharing a warm, entertaining evening with a witty aunt--one who knows all the old songs and revels in adding a bawdy verse or a rowdy tale. Redpath's performance Saturday night at the elegant Huntington Library in San Marino was a commemoration of the centenary of the death of Robert Burns. "And isn't it just like the Scots," she said, with a sly grin, "to be celebratin' the man's death instead of his birth?"
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TRAVEL
September 1, 2013 | By Kari Howard
WIGTOWN, Scotland - "You're on the road to nowhere. " The roads were getting narrower and narrower on the drive through southwestern Scotland. We had left behind the divided highway outside Glasgow, and then, somewhere near the towns with signs saying "Haste Ye Back," had lost the painted line down the middle of the two-lane road. For a few miles now, we had been on a one-track road, the kind where you must back up to the last lay-by if you meet a car coming from the other direction.
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BOOKS
January 24, 1988
Is there, for honest poverty, That hangs his head, and a' that? The coward-slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a' that! For a' that, and a' that Our toils obscure, and a' that The rank is but the guinea stamp; The man's the gowd for a' that. What tho' on hamely fare we dine, Wear hodden-gray, and a' that; Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine, A man's a man for a' that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008
What's so awful about offal? The Glutton, intrigued by any meat product that's cooked in another meat product, has vowed to test her courage with haggis, a traditional Scottish dish made by grinding sheep's organs with oats, spices and minced onions, then boiling them in the stomach of said sheep. If you've eaten a Dodger dog, you've probably eaten worse. Few restaurants cook haggis. If they do, they offer it only once a year, in late January, at their annual Robert Burns supper.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
On a wintry evening, fat snowflakes fall on the thatched roof of a three-room stone cottage by a country road. Inside, a cow and some chickens rustle in their stalls. In the adjacent room, a family gathers around a fire to hear father read Scripture by candlelight. Listening with an expression of rapt attention is a curly-haired 8-year-old boy who is destined to become the national poet of Scotland--and among the most intensely adored figures in English literature.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
Robert Burns had been out of prison for 27 years--starting a painting business, raising five kids and falling victim to stroke, heart attack and cancer--when his violent past caught up with him. Three weeks ago, while Burns watched his son change the oil in his daughter's car, FBI agents piled out of a van, handcuffed the 70-year-old Burns and hauled him off to the Lane County jail.
FOOD
January 25, 1996 | MARILYN KLUGER, Kluger, of Newburgh, Ind., is the author of five cookbooks, including "The Midwestern Country Cookbook."
In Scotland, Jan. 25 is designated Burns Night, an occasion when Scots remember their greatest poet, Robert Burns (1759-1796). His birthday is commemorated in many places with a special Burns Night dinner, which involves drinking toasts and eating haggis. After the meal, there are speeches, recitations of Burns' poems, including the favorite "Tam O' Shanter," and singing of Burns' songs long into the night.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
Re "Opossum Killings Test Limits of Cruelty Cases," July 29: Causing suffering to any living creature to satisfy one's ego says volumes about a person's character--or lack thereof. It is often said that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he or she treats animals that they have control over. The way they treat those creatures is the way they would treat humans if they had the same level of control. If you happen to live near one of these people, keep an eye on your children as well as your furry family members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without a job or even a place to live, Robert and Carolyn Burns spent some nights this year huddled in their 1972 Buick with their 5-year-old son and 3-year-old daughter. On Tuesday, however, the Burns family put that life behind them and prepared to settle into a new two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in North Hollywood. "I've done quite a bit of worrying and wondering what was going to happen," said Robert Burns, 27, as he sat in the complex's courtyard.
TRAVEL
November 21, 1999
Concerning the Her World column on Fanny Stevenson, the wife of Robert Louis Stevenson ("A 'Clinging Vine' Who Flourished as Vigorously as Any Stately Oak," Oct. 24): Another wonderful place to study the life and work of this writer is the Writers' Museum in Edinburgh. Housed in the narrow, 17th century Lady Stair's House off the Lawnmarket in the upper reaches of the Royal Mile, it can be hard to find but is well worth the search. It contains exhibits relating to Robert Burns, Robert Louis Stevenson and Sir Walter Scott.
NEWS
January 28, 2007 | Ben McConville, Associated Press Writer
Take heart, liver and lung of sheep, roll in oatmeal, add pepper and stuff into beef intestine. Boil for four hours until "warm-reekin' rich." Enjoy. A skeptical world is catching on to the charms of the humble haggis, according to producers of the essential delicacy for this year's Burns Night celebrations. Thursday marked the 248th anniversary of the poet Robert Burns' birth.
TRAVEL
January 14, 2007 | Amy Hubbard
Fresno, Calif. Jan. 27: His love, like a red, red rose, is newly sprung in June, but the traditional celebration for Scottish poet Robert Burns takes place in January. Burns Suppers are held in a variety of locales. In Fresno, they'll be raising drams and toasting the haggis at the Scottish Society of Central California's 24th annual event. Entertainment includes Scottish folk singing, Highland dancers and the Fresno Stag & Thistle Pipe Band. 5:30 p.m. Love & Garlic, 5351 N. Diana St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Robert Paschal Burns, 71, an architect who worked on New York's Juilliard School of Music and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, died Friday in an automobile accident near his farm in Bennett, N.C. Burns earned an undergraduate degree in architecture from North Carolina State University and won the prestigious Paris Prize in Architecture in 1957. After receiving his master's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he became an architect in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
Re "Opossum Killings Test Limits of Cruelty Cases," July 29: Causing suffering to any living creature to satisfy one's ego says volumes about a person's character--or lack thereof. It is often said that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he or she treats animals that they have control over. The way they treat those creatures is the way they would treat humans if they had the same level of control. If you happen to live near one of these people, keep an eye on your children as well as your furry family members.
NEWS
January 30, 2002 | SUSAN MORGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Robert Burns was sort of the Kurt Cobain of 18th century Scotland," said historian Arthur Herman. The author of the recent "How the Scots Invented the Modern World: The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World & Everything In It" spoke for a few minutes from his home in Washington, D.C., about Scotland's national poet on the eve of Burns Night, the annual celebration commemorating Burns' birth in 1759.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | MARK SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the kind of party Robert Burns would have liked--a supper of cake and Scotch whiskey, song, merriment, lots of lassies and, of course, poetry. Then there was the adoration and awe, not just for the great poet but for the 40 men who, 200 years ago, gathered in a local tavern here, raised their glasses and declared themselves the world's first Burns club.
TRAVEL
February 18, 1990
Hats off to John Hannah and your Travel Section for the fine Feb. 4 article on Robert Burns and the lovely photographs of his birthplace. Perhaps he should have emphasized that more than 500,000 Burns admirers meet the world over to honor Burns on his birthday. What other poet is so honored in such faraway places as Winnipeg, Kuwait, Nigeria, Denmark, the Soviet Union and China? We mustered more than 200 admirers at our recent Burns Night here in San Luis Obispo County, where ethnicity does not necessarily lean toward Scotland.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008
What's so awful about offal? The Glutton, intrigued by any meat product that's cooked in another meat product, has vowed to test her courage with haggis, a traditional Scottish dish made by grinding sheep's organs with oats, spices and minced onions, then boiling them in the stomach of said sheep. If you've eaten a Dodger dog, you've probably eaten worse. Few restaurants cook haggis. If they do, they offer it only once a year, in late January, at their annual Robert Burns supper.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
Robert Burns had been out of prison for 27 years--starting a painting business, raising five kids and falling victim to stroke, heart attack and cancer--when his violent past caught up with him. Three weeks ago, while Burns watched his son change the oil in his daughter's car, FBI agents piled out of a van, handcuffed the 70-year-old Burns and hauled him off to the Lane County jail.
TRAVEL
November 21, 1999
Concerning the Her World column on Fanny Stevenson, the wife of Robert Louis Stevenson ("A 'Clinging Vine' Who Flourished as Vigorously as Any Stately Oak," Oct. 24): Another wonderful place to study the life and work of this writer is the Writers' Museum in Edinburgh. Housed in the narrow, 17th century Lady Stair's House off the Lawnmarket in the upper reaches of the Royal Mile, it can be hard to find but is well worth the search. It contains exhibits relating to Robert Burns, Robert Louis Stevenson and Sir Walter Scott.
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