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Robert C Byrd

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NATIONAL
September 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the oldest member of Congress at 87, is expected to announce next week that he will run for a ninth Senate term. "He has every intention to seek reelection," spokesman Tom Gavin said in Charleston. In an e-mail to supporters of the Democrat's reelection, Ned Rose, chairman of Friends of Robert C. Byrd, said Byrd would make his announcement Wednesday at the state Capitol.
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NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin hit West Virginia on Saturday, campaigning on behalf of Republican John Raese, who is locked in a close Senate race against Gov. Joe Manchin. “Mountain mamas,” Palin said greeting the crowd. “Is that anything close to mama grizzlies?" she asked, using the name she gave a group of conservative female candidates who have challenged the GOP establishment and are running with mixed success in the midterm elections Tuesday. Palin and her husband Todd traveled overnight from Alaska to appear with rock 'n' roll star Ted Nugent, whom she called her blood brother because of his conservative views.
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OPINION
February 23, 2003
In the last week, two speeches have been showing up in e-mail boxes around the world. Each is a rallying cry for a different constituency. The first, an address given by British Prime Minister Tony Blair at a Labor Party conference in Glasgow, Scotland, on Feb. 15, is a passionate explanation of the potential need for war in Iraq. The other, a Feb. 12 speech by Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) on the Senate floor, questions the Bush administration's foreign policy.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III has postponed the appointment of a replacement for the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd until state officials clarify how soon a special election can be held, a move that leaves Senate Democrats short a potentially crucial vote at least until next week. Manchin said Wednesday that he would prefer to allow voters to choose someone to complete Byrd's unexpired term in an election this fall. Until the state attorney general determines whether he is empowered to call for such a vote, however, Manchin said he would not name a temporary replacement.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | Associated Press
Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) is back at work after having a cataract removed from his left eye. Byrd, 82, had the 25-minute procedure performed Tuesday morning and returned to work the same afternoon, a spokeswoman said Wednesday. A cataract was removed from his right eye three months ago.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighty-seven-year-old Democrat Robert C. Byrd announced in Charleston that he would seek a record ninth term in the Senate. Byrd told supporters he was "ready to go. Another round."
NEWS
June 13, 1986 | United Press International
Senate Democratic leader Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia and his two key deputies, Alan Cranston of California and Daniel K. Inouye of Hawaii, announced Thursday that they will run for reelection as party leaders. Byrd is being challenged for the party leadership post by J. Bennett Johnston of Louisiana.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Robert C. Byrd, the longest-serving senator in history, returned to the chamber after being absent for more than two months because of an illness. The 91-year-old West Virginia Democrat voted to extend production of F-22 fighter planes, but was on the losing end of the 58-40 vote.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the 80-year-old Democrat from West Virginia who has spent half his life in the Senate, extended his own record by casting his 15,000th vote. Byrd entered the Senate in 1959 and is serving his seventh six-year term. He became the record-holder for most votes in 1990 at 12,134, and today remains 137 votes ahead of the Senate's other abiding institution, 95-year-old Republican Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. Byrd has a 98.7% voting record.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) apologized for his use of a racial epithet in an interview. Asked about race relations today, the 83-year-old Byrd said in the interview with "Fox News Sunday" that they are "much, much better than they've ever been in my lifetime. . . . I think we talk about race too much. I think those problems are largely behind us." He continued: "I think we try to have good will. My old mom told me, 'Robert, you can't go to heaven if you hate anybody.' We practice that.
OPINION
July 1, 2010
Enraged over a rave Re "Girl, 15, dies after rave," June 30, and "Scores injured at music festival," June 28 If I am reading your article -- or at least its emphasis -- correctly, a girl died after attending a downtown rave because she managed to slip in underage. Thousands of teenagers crash movies, concerts and other age-restricted events throughout America every day. They don't all die. The raver did not die because she was 15. She probably died because, according to preliminary tests, she took Ecstasy.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro and Richard Simon, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate convened Monday with white roses on an empty desk in the second row where Robert C. Byrd last sat, an institutional vacancy that will not soon be filled even after his successor is named. When the nine-term Democratic senator from West Virginia spoke, Washington listened. He commanded attention in a way that no other modern lawmaker does, leaving the question: Who will guide the chamber now? "The first answer to that is, nobody," said Norman Ornstein, a constitutional scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia Sen. Robert Byrd, the longest-serving member of Congress in history, was seriously ill in a Washington-area hospital, a spokesman said Sunday. Byrd, 92, was hospitalized late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration stemming from hot weather. But other unspecified conditions developed and his condition is now serious, his spokesman said. Byrd, a Democrat, has served in Congress for 57 years. A former Senate majority leader and Appropriations Committee chairman, he is legendary for sprinkling floor speeches with references to the Bible and Roman history, his mastery of the chamber's rules and traditions, and his skill in delivering pork-barrel projects to his state, where scores of things have been named after him. "We are truly hopeful that he gets well soon," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III said in a statement, "because West Virginians need his leadership in Washington."
OPINION
August 27, 2009
For once, the extravagant elegies for a departed public figure are appropriate. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, in President Obama's words, was "the greatest United States senator of our time," at least for those who shared his passion for an activist federal government attuned to the needs of the poor and the marginalized. Speculation about whether Kennedy might have pursued his passion for equality from the White House once occupied by his brother is inevitable, as is meditation on the multiple misfortunes of the Kennedy clan.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Robert C. Byrd, the longest-serving senator in history, returned to the chamber after being absent for more than two months because of an illness. The 91-year-old West Virginia Democrat voted to extend production of F-22 fighter planes, but was on the losing end of the 58-40 vote.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Sen. George Smathers used to tell a story about how Robert C. Byrd turned down half a dozen invitations to join other senators in Florida for deep-sea fishing or golf or gin rummy or tennis. "I have never in my life played a game of cards. I have never had a golf club in my hand. I have never in my life hit a tennis ball," Byrd told the Florida Democrat, according to an interview Smathers gave a Senate historian. "I don't do any of those things. I have only had to work all my life."
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | United Press International
Senate Democratic leader Robert C. Byrd suggested today that the United States move the Soviet Embassy in Washington to a swamp full of alligators. Byrd, deeply disturbed by the Soviet spying in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and apparent large-scale deployment of eavesdropping equipment built into the new U.S. Embassy still under construction, said Monday the United States faced an "alarming security sieve." Asked today whether he agreed with a suggestion from Rep. William S. Broomfield (R-Mich.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
The Democratic chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee called for an across-the-board cut in federal spending to finance a $10-billion package of anti-drug funding--some $2 billion more than the $7.9 billion proposed by President Bush. The sweeping proposal by Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W. Va.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighty-seven-year-old Democrat Robert C. Byrd announced in Charleston that he would seek a record ninth term in the Senate. Byrd told supporters he was "ready to go. Another round."
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