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Robert C Dutton

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March 7, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North told a retired Air Force officer who helped him resupply Nicaragua's rebels that "someday the President will shake your hand," the officer told a federal court jury Monday. Retired Col. Robert C. Dutton said that North made the remark to him in September, 1986, after Dutton had solved tactical problems that prevented the Contras from receiving airdrops of weapons and medical supplies purchased with private donations.
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NEWS
March 7, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North told a retired Air Force officer who helped him resupply Nicaragua's rebels that "someday the President will shake your hand," the officer told a federal court jury Monday. Retired Col. Robert C. Dutton said that North made the remark to him in September, 1986, after Dutton had solved tactical problems that prevented the Contras from receiving airdrops of weapons and medical supplies purchased with private donations.
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NEWS
May 28, 1987 | From Times Staff Writers
Following are excerpts from testimony Wednesday of retired Air Force Col. Robert C. Dutton on his involvement with an air resupply effort for the contras directed by retired Gen. Richard V. Secord and Lt. Col. Oliver L. North: (Dutton was asked by House Deputy Counsel Ken Ballen about a photographic album of secret bases in Central America that he prepared for North.) Question: And why did you prepare this photograph album? Answer: I thought it was very direct evidence of what was there.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
Retired Air Force Col. Robert C. Dutton, operations chief of a private network that flew arms to Nicaragua's contras , testified Wednesday before congressional investigators that he prepared a photograph album of his operation and gave it to a White House aide who said it would be shown to "the top boss"--President Reagan. The album, which Dutton gave to Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
Retired Air Force Col. Robert C. Dutton, operations chief of a private network that flew arms to Nicaragua's contras , testified Wednesday before congressional investigators that he prepared a photograph album of his operation and gave it to a White House aide who said it would be shown to "the top boss"--President Reagan. The album, which Dutton gave to Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A cryptic message sped last year from the jungles of Central America to the halls of the White House--a plaintive cry from one of Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's secret warriors. "Send Fawn," it said. "Can't continue on milk and cookies." Fawn Hall, North's winsome blond secretary, appears to have been an inspiration to at least one officer in North's secret contra airlift, according to a document released Wednesday by congressional investigators.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Joe Fernandez, former CIA station chief in Costa Rica, whose alias is Tomas Castillo, will be questioned in a closed session by the Iran- contra investigating committees today about his alleged role in providing military assistance to the Nicaraguan rebels at a time when the agency was prohibited by Congress from doing so. Fernandez will be questioned in closed session to protect his identity, committee members said. A transcript of the testimony will be made public.
NEWS
May 18, 1987
Robert C. Dutton, a retired Air Force colonel who helped run a private program to aid the Nicaraguan rebels, testified before a federal grand jury investigating the Iran- contra affair after receiving a grant of immunity from independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, it was reported. Dutton worked with retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord in supplying arms to the rebels, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
In questioning retired Air Force Col. Robert C. Dutton at the congressional hearing investigating the Iran- contra affair Wednesday, Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) asked about the use of the code designation "DZ." This, he found out, stood for "Drop Zone." But what, he wondered aloud to great laughter from the committees and the audience, did the following communique that Dutton had sent signify? "Send Fawn. Can't continue on milk and cookies. Regards, Bob."
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Senate and House committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal decided Tuesday to delay testimony from Iranian-American arms dealer Albert A. Hakim to allow investigators sufficient time to look into leads that he provided them in a weekend interview. Hakim was to have been the first witness when the hearings resume today after a break for the Memorial Day weekend. In his place, the committees will hear from Robert C.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | From Times Staff Writers
Following are excerpts from testimony Wednesday of retired Air Force Col. Robert C. Dutton on his involvement with an air resupply effort for the contras directed by retired Gen. Richard V. Secord and Lt. Col. Oliver L. North: (Dutton was asked by House Deputy Counsel Ken Ballen about a photographic album of secret bases in Central America that he prepared for North.) Question: And why did you prepare this photograph album? Answer: I thought it was very direct evidence of what was there.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Senate and House committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal voted today to hold all hearings jointly and agreed to a timetable for granting limited immunity to former national security adviser John M. Poindexter and his deputy, Oliver L. North, while delaying their public testimony until June. The agreement between the congressional panels and the government's special prosecutor was approved during closed-door meetings of the two committees, their chairmen said.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Newly discovered bank records suggest that at least $1.5 million in profits from the Reagan Administration's secret arms sales to Iran were used to buy and service airplanes for the Nicaraguan rebels, investigators said Monday. The bank records show that a Swiss company that is believed to have handled money from the Iranian arms deal transferred funds to a dummy company in Panama, which then paid for planes for the contras ' secret airlift, they said.
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