Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert C Fellmeth
IN THE NEWS

Robert C Fellmeth

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. George Deukmejian takes a number to wait in line at a barbershop near his Long Beach home, he gets his hair cut by Robert O. Boulding, a member of the Board of Barber Examiners. When he attends services at All Saints' Episcopal Church in Long Beach, Deukmejian listens to sermons delivered by the Rev. William A. Thompson, chairman of the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners. When the governor returns to his Belmont Shore neighborhood, he can wave hello to James A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. George Deukmejian takes a number to wait in line at a barbershop near his Long Beach home, he gets his hair cut by Robert O. Boulding, a member of the Board of Barber Examiners. When he attends services at All Saints' Episcopal Church in Long Beach, Deukmejian listens to sermons delivered by the Rev. William A. Thompson, chairman of the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners. When the governor returns to his Belmont Shore neighborhood, he can wave hello to James A.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1989
A controversial report on the California Board of Medical Quality Assurance, the state agency responsible for disciplining doctors, has at least served to attract attention to the need for better enforcement. For three years, the board has been denied the funds it needs to do a better job. The new report is the work of Robert C. Fellmeth of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego and, to our way of thinking, it falls short of the kind of objective outside analysis that would make a major contribution to solving the problem posed by bad doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992
The guilt or innocence of gynecologist Ivan C. Namihas, who has been accused of sexually molesting many women patients, has yet to be determined. But something is terribly wrong with a state review system that allowed complaints filed against the Tustin physician over many years to receive so little attention.
NEWS
March 19, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of ongoing efforts to make the California Medical Board more consumer oriented, the board's executive director said Friday that he would prefer to have its work funded by state taxpayers instead of physician licensing fees. "I don't like that surgeons and physicians pay fees to support us," said Dixon Arnett, who was one of several participants in a panel discussion at the California Medical Assn.'s annual Western Scientific Assembly here.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Assembly voted Thursday to give regulators strong new tools to stop substandard doctors from practicing medicine as it approved legislation to beef up the state's physician discipline system. The measure by Sen. Robert Presley (D-Riverside) and Assemblywoman Jackie Speier (D-South San Francisco) won 75-1 approval in the Assembly.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
Critical problems continue to plague the State Bar's system for disciplining attorneys but recent reforms and an expected infusion of funds will soon make California's the premier system in the nation, according to a state-appointed monitor. Robert C. Fellmeth, a San Diego attorney appointed by Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp to study ways of reducing the backlog of complaints against lawyers, called the current system of dealing with unethical attorneys "a mess."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1988
The State Bar's disciplinary system isn't as bad as its detractors suggest, but, as State Bar President P. Terry Anderlini admits, it is "not one we can be proud of." Some overdue changes have been undertaken since the Legislature scared the Bar two years ago by threatening to relieve California's lawyers of their traditional responsibility of policing themselves and turn the task over to a state commission.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | MARK GLADSTONE and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State government, from Gov. Pete Wilson on down, is abdicating its responsibility to California's 9 million children, especially the 2.3 million poor children who increasingly rely on public services, according to an advocacy group. In a comprehensive report issued Monday, the nonprofit Children's Advocacy Institute maintained that when the state suffers an earthquake or other major natural disaster, officials rush to provide billions of dollars in relief. Lacking a similar calamity to galvanize the state's political leadership, children are experiencing a "slow strangulation" of funds for health, welfare and education.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp on Saturday urged leaders of the State Bar of California to hire independent administrative law judges to handle attorney discipline hearings before an angry Legislature strips the Bar of its discipline power. Wearing a pink "L.A. Lawyer" lapel button adopted by the local Bar association from the name of the popular television show, Van de Kamp rose from his delegate's seat to address the Bar's Conference of Delegates.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|