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Robert C Gallo

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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major federal investigation has cleared prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo of any scientific wrongdoing in the 1984 discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, according to sources at the National Institutes of Health.
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NEWS
December 7, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A prominent AIDS researcher said Wednesday that he has isolated three chemicals that may be the long-sought naturally occurring inhibitors of the AIDS virus. Dr. Robert Gallo, co-discoverer of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, reports in a paper to be published next week in Science that the three closely related chemicals he has isolated from human blood cells may halt the growth of HIV.
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NEWS
November 24, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Robert C. Gallo, a preeminent AIDS researcher, has entered "serious, substantial" negotiations to leave the National Cancer Institute and establish an international center for AIDS research at a major university. Gallo said that he wants to establish "the world's foremost institute of human virology" and that several leading scientists at the federal cancer agency, part of the National Institutes of Health, and at other institutions have expressed an interest in joining him.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the peripatetic and controversial co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, announced Wednesday that he will leave his job at the National Institutes of Health to create a major human virology research institute at the University of Maryland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
The discoverers of the AIDS virus, Dr. Robert C. Gallo of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Luc Montagnier of the Pasteur Institute in Paris, were in Los Angeles Thursday to receive an award at the annual meeting of the American Assn. of Blood Banks. Gallo said he was "optimistic" that improvement therapies against the AIDS virus will be developed within the next five years, but added that he "will never predict one way or the other when we will have a vaccine."
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human volunteers were not adequately protected during studies of an experimental AIDS vaccine, the National Institutes of Health says in a report critical of a French researcher and his U.S. collaborator, according to knowledgeable sources. The probe, conducted by NIH's Office for Protection from Research Risks, said that Dr. Daniel Zagury of the University of Paris violated regulations.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a preliminary inquiry appears to have cleared prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo of charges that he stole the first identified AIDS virus, the announcement of a new, expanded investigation has raised fresh concerns about Gallo and the future of federal research on the virus.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the peripatetic and controversial co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, announced Wednesday that he will leave his job at the National Institutes of Health to create a major human virology research institute at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo has produced further evidence that he did not steal the first identified AIDS virus from Dr. Luc Montagnier of the Paris-based Pasteur Institute. Gallo and Montagnier are generally considered to be the co-discoverers of the AIDS virus. But there have been repeated disputes over the last seven years about how the credit should be shared.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators have concluded that prominent AIDS researcher Robert C. Gallo committed scientific misconduct in connection with a paper he wrote on the discovery of the AIDS virus, according to a Department of Health and Human Services report released Wednesday. But investigators found no evidence to support more serious charges that Gallo or his colleagues stole samples of the virus from a French laboratory.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major federal investigation has cleared prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo of any scientific wrongdoing in the 1984 discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, according to sources at the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human volunteers were not adequately protected during studies of an experimental AIDS vaccine, the National Institutes of Health says in a report critical of a French researcher and his U.S. collaborator, according to knowledgeable sources. The probe, conducted by NIH's Office for Protection from Research Risks, said that Dr. Daniel Zagury of the University of Paris violated regulations.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A top government scientist credited with co-discovery of the AIDS virus conceded Thursday that the virus he identified in 1984 appears to have been a contaminant from a separate AIDS virus specimen that already had been identified by French scientists. The acknowledgement by Dr. Robert Gallo of the mix-up helps answer nagging questions about the striking similarity between the initial U.S.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In the latest chapter in the dispute over who discovered the virus that causes AIDS, French researchers say they now have evidence to bolster their claim that the AIDS virus isolated by virologist Robert Gallo in 1983 was in a specimen they sent to him and that they deserve credit for its isolation. In February, Gallo published a report that seemed to show that his virus was significantly different from a French version he acknowledges receiving.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo has produced further evidence that he did not steal the first identified AIDS virus from Dr. Luc Montagnier of the Paris-based Pasteur Institute. Gallo and Montagnier are generally considered to be the co-discoverers of the AIDS virus. But there have been repeated disputes over the last seven years about how the credit should be shared.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Robert C. Gallo, a co-discoverer of the virus that causes AIDS, defended the pace of federal research into the deadly disease, although in an interview Tuesday he criticized the government's attitude, saying, "There is not a wartime mentality." Gallo, who is in Los Angeles to deliver the Mautner Memorial Lectures at UCLA, was commenting on a recently issued congressional report entitled "AIDS Drugs: Where Are They?"
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators have concluded that prominent AIDS researcher Robert C. Gallo committed scientific misconduct in connection with a paper he wrote on the discovery of the AIDS virus, according to a Department of Health and Human Services report released Wednesday. But investigators found no evidence to support more serious charges that Gallo or his colleagues stole samples of the virus from a French laboratory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
The discoverers of the AIDS virus, Dr. Robert C. Gallo of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Luc Montagnier of the Pasteur Institute in Paris, were in Los Angeles Thursday to receive an award at the annual meeting of the American Assn. of Blood Banks. Gallo said he was "optimistic" that improvement therapies against the AIDS virus will be developed within the next five years, but added that he "will never predict one way or the other when we will have a vaccine."
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a preliminary inquiry appears to have cleared prominent AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo of charges that he stole the first identified AIDS virus, the announcement of a new, expanded investigation has raised fresh concerns about Gallo and the future of federal research on the virus.
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