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Robert C Mcfarlane

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NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Fire investigators on Monday said an improperly installed fireplace caused a fire that did an estimated $75,000 damage to the home of former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane. The fire broke out Sunday afternoon at the townhouse of McFarlane and his wife, Jonda, in the Georgetown section of the city, officials said. No one was injured.
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November 6, 1994 | Chris Goodrich, Chris Goodrich is a regular reviewer for The Times
In August, 1993, independent counsel Lawrence Walsh issued his final report on the Iran-Contra scandal. His ultimate findings made the front page of many newspapers, but by no means all, for journalists and citizens alike were weary of the story after seven years of partisan finger-pointing, fragmentary reporting, internecine recrimination and never-ending attempts at spin control.
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NEWS
March 14, 1988
Despite last week's guilty pleas from former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane, independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh and his staff have been frustrated by a failure to get the cooperation of key witnesses and vital documentation, the Washington Post reported. Walsh's decision to allow McFarlane to plead guilty to lesser misdemeanors was, in part, dictated by Walsh's belief that he needed McFarlane to be a witness against Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, retired Rear Adm. John M.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush deceived the public about their knowledge of the Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages deal, according to memoirs being published Monday by one of the central figures in the event, former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane. McFarlane says he briefed President Reagan and then-Vice President Bush from the start of the deal in 1985, 17 months earlier than Bush admits he knew about it.
NEWS
March 14, 1988
Robert C. McFarlane, former national security adviser, said that even though he has promised to cooperate with the independent counsel investigating the Iran-Contra affair, he is unable to provide any new information. "In saying I expect to testify, it's neither for nor against really anyone," McFarlane said on ABC-TV's "This Week With David Brinkley." "It's to say what I've already said on the record, and there's nothing new that I know of to change what's there."
NEWS
August 6, 1987
Iranian Revolutionary Guards planned to kidnap former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane and Lt. Col. Oliver L. North when they visited Tehran last year, the West German magazine Stern reported. Stern said its unnamed source was a former commander in the Revolutionary Guards.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former White House National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane gave another glimpse Tuesday of the disdain with which U.S. officials viewed Manucher Ghorbanifar, middleman in arms sales to Iran. Testifying at a congressional hearing on the Iran- contra affair, McFarlane was asked about a confrontation at a London meeting with Ghorbanifar, who was angry that the wrong kind of missiles had been shipped to Iran.
NEWS
May 17, 1988
Former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane was identified as an unindicted Iran-Contra co-conspirator in Oliver L. North's motion to be tried separately from his three co-defendants. McFarlane, who pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of withholding information from Congress about secret Reagan Administration aid to Nicaraguan Contras, was mentioned in a footnote to North's request. The names of the unindicted co-conspirators in the case have been sealed by the court.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Hashemi Rafsanjani, Speaker of Iran's Parliament, said Wednesday that an intermediary for the United States approached Iranian leaders "a few days ago" and urged them to contact President Reagan. Tehran radio said Rafsanjani "referred to the problem of (former U.S. National Security Adviser Robert C.) McFarlane" in a speech. The radio report said: "Referring to the disgraceful U.S.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
When the joint House-Senate inquiry into the Iran- contra affair resumes today, the witness will be Robert C. McFarlane, President Reagan's national security adviser from October, 1983, to December, 1985, and a central figure in the scandal. McFarlane was the top White House policy-maker when the Iran arms-for-hostages project was conceived in the summer of 1985. He also was in charge when Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a marked difference with many Democrats in Congress, two Democratic leaders--House Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington and defense secretary nominee Les Aspin of Wisconsin--had assured President Bush they would support his decision to pardon former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, The Times has learned.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Following is independent counsel Lawrence Walsh' statement on the presidential pardon of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others charged in the Iran-Contra scandal: President Bush's pardon of Caspar Weinberger and other Iran-Contra defendants undermines the principle that no man is above the law. It demonstrates that powerful people with powerful allies can commit serious crimes in high office--deliberately abusing the public trust--without consequence.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
Following is the text of President Bush's statement pardoning former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others in the Iran-Contra investigation: Today I am exercising my power under the Constitution to pardon former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and others for their conduct related to the Iran-Contra affair.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush granted Christmas Eve pardons to former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and five other former government officials Thursday, wiping out all pending criminal prosecutions in the Iran-Contra case. In an angry statement, the Iran-Contra independent counsel, Lawrence E. Walsh, accused Bush of "misconduct" and declared that the pardon was part of the cover-up that "has continued for more than six years."
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday dropped all criminal charges against Oliver L. North, the central figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, ending a saga that the former White House aide characterized as "five years of fire." U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell dismissed the case at the request of independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, who said that testimony provided last week by North's former boss, Robert C. McFarlane, made it unlikely that North's previous convictions could be reinstated.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clair E. George, former head of CIA covert operations, pleaded innocent Thursday to federal charges that he perjured himself, obstructed investigations and made false statements to cover up the Iran-contra scandal. The plea came amid indications that his defense, even more than those of defendants before him, will center on highly classified documents.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former White House National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane, who attempted suicide three months ago in anguish over the Iran- contra scandal, told investigating congressmen Tuesday to quit treating him like "a fragile flower." As McFarlane entered his eighth hour of testimony at hearings of select House and Senate committees on the Iran-contra affair, House counsel John W. Nields Jr. prefaced a question with a semi-apology for going into an area that is "not perhaps your favorite."
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
The Speaker of Iran's Parliament says former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane offered to trade himself for American hostages in Lebanon, Tehran's official news agency reported Thursday. Hashemi Rafsanjani said McFarlane made the offer during a secret visit to the Iranian capital last year, the Islamic Republic News Agency reported. Eight of the 26 foreigners missing in Lebanon are Americans. Most of the hostages are believed held by pro-Iranian Shia Muslim groups.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert C. McFarlane, former White House national security adviser, dismayed prosecutors Wednesday by saying that his testimony at Oliver L. North's Iran-Contra trial was "colored" by North's "riveting" appearance before televised congressional hearings on the scandal.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When members of Congress wanted to know two years ago who was primarily responsible for the Iran-Contra affair, former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter told them defiantly: "The buck stops here with me." "I made the decision," Poindexter testified to the Iran-Contra committees. "I had the authority to do it. I thought it was a good idea. I was convinced that the President would in the end think it was a good idea, but I did not want him to be associated with it."
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