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Robert C Sheets

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NEWS
November 15, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blustery winds and driving rain lashed much of Florida Monday as Tropical Storm Gordon canceled school for 9,200 children in the Keys, diverted the space shuttle to California and recalled for many the horror of Hurricane Andrew two years ago. Before bearing down on Florida, the late-season storm was blamed for at least 100 deaths in the Caribbean, where heavy rains caused flooding and mudslides in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica. With sustained winds of about 50 m.p.h.
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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hurricane season in the Atlantic, and for about 40 million residents of the U.S. East and Gulf coasts, a warning to leave home and run for the hills will come from here. But this year, forecasters worry whether they will be able to do the job adequately. "We're faced with catastrophic equipment failure, and no backup," said National Hurricane Center director Robert C. Sheets. The equipment Sheets is worried about is GOES-7, the only U.S.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | DONALD J. FREDERICK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Government weather watchers on this sandy Delmarva Peninsula ridge eagerly await an aging European satellite that should help nervous forecasters breathe a little easier. By January the German weather satellite, Meteosat-3, will be relocated in space to provide better weather coverage of the United States while a new U.S. satellite is being readied.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert C. Sheets, director of the National Hurricane Center, became a familiar face to millions last August, appearing hourly on TV to warn of the approach of Hurricane Andrew, which killed 15 people and became the most costly natural disaster in U.S. history. In 30 years as a meteorologist, Sheets, 55, has flown into the eyes of hurricanes more than 200 times. He tracked Andrew even as it threatened to blow apart his sixth-floor Coral Gables office.
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