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Robert C Wright

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BUSINESS
September 14, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
NBC President Robert C. Wright came to his job from General Electric Co. a year ago this month, and within days had received a performance review from Johnny Carson. After meeting the new boss at NBC's Burbank studios, Carson told his "Tonight Show" audience that Wright seemed like a nice fellow. But Carson wasn't sure about some of the ideas proposed by the one-time GE small-appliance executive--such as replacing "Wheel of Fortune" hostess Vanna White with an electric letter-turner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY
Bob Wright enjoys a sweeping, panoramic view from an office more than 50 floors above the pavement in the General Electric building, but one could argue it's time, rather than space, that provides his perspective. Wright, 57, is fast approaching his 15th anniversary as president of NBC, having begun as the network's president in September 1986.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 1987
Warren Bennis' Viewpoints column on Feb. 8, "Doing Damage at NBC: The Wrong Approach by Mr. Wright," justifiably took Robert C. Wright to task for his pinch-penny methods of managing NBC, to which Wright was recently posted by the network's new owner, General Electric. It seems, however, that Wright and his GE biggies have a different standard when it comes to personal perks, as related in the Neil Morgan column in the San Diego Tribune on Feb. 9: "Delegates to the General Electric convention just ended at Hotel Del Coronado built a reputation among staff as the hotel's biggest spenders ever."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The formal portion of the annual NBC affiliates meeting here began Monday with a painful look back at the past. Robert C. Wright, president of the embattled network, faced about 600 attendees from the 208 NBC affiliates across the country and spoke of the struggles and scandals that have tumbled the network into an unenviable third-place position. "This, in many respects, has been a very trying year for us," Wright said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 8,000 people in attendance, 1990's convention of the National Assn. of Television Programming Executives is the largest ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
John F. Welch, now in two roles as board chairman of both General Electric and NBC, suggested Tuesday that a "no meddling" policy GE has had toward the news divisions of its broadcast operations will continue for NBC News on reports concerning GE. The question of NBC News' independence in covering stories about GE, a major defense contractor, were raised earlier this year by various critics, including Ralph Nader, in the wake of GE's $6.4 billion takeover of RCA and RCA-owned NBC.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
NBC President Robert C. Wright, faced with growing criticism about the network's performance, on Thursday denied widespread speculation that corporate parent General Electric Co. had become disenchanted with the broadcasting business and wanted to get out of it. "GE has no plans to sell NBC," Wright told representatives of 210 affiliate stations gathered in New York for their annual convention. "And I sincerely hope we justify GE's faith.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1986 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
General Electric's GE Financial Services unit will buy 80% of the investment house of Kidder, Peabody & Co. in an all-cash deal said by sources to be worth $600 million, the two companies formally announced Friday. The agreement, reached Thursday evening, capped 11 days of negotiation and will give 121-year-old Kidder the capital that it will need in the coming battle among ever-larger financial conglomerates, company officials asserted at a morning press conference here.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Despite its "strike-proof" fall plans to air the Summer Olympic Games and the World Series instead of new entertainment programming, NBC would have been hit the hardest of the three networks if the Writers Guild of America strike had not reached a tentative end last week, the network's president and chief executive officer Robert C. Wright says. Although entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff, as well as other TV industry observers, have said No.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Despite criticism from anti-abortion groups, NBC's "Roe vs. Wade" was fully sponsored and easily won Monday's ratings--but with a smaller audience than the network had projected, ratings figures showed Tuesday. To NBC's surprise, the majority of viewer calls to NBC here and in Burbank during Monday's broadcast favored the two-hour program, with a total of 394 approving it and 77 protesting it, a network spokesman said. "People are much more apt to complain, so that is a surprise," said the spokesman, Curt Block.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
NBC President Robert C. Wright, faced with growing criticism about the network's performance, on Thursday denied widespread speculation that corporate parent General Electric Co. had become disenchanted with the broadcasting business and wanted to get out of it. "GE has no plans to sell NBC," Wright told representatives of 210 affiliate stations gathered in New York for their annual convention. "And I sincerely hope we justify GE's faith.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 8,000 people in attendance, 1990's convention of the National Assn. of Television Programming Executives is the largest ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Despite criticism from anti-abortion groups, NBC's "Roe vs. Wade" was fully sponsored and easily won Monday's ratings--but with a smaller audience than the network had projected, ratings figures showed Tuesday. To NBC's surprise, the majority of viewer calls to NBC here and in Burbank during Monday's broadcast favored the two-hour program, with a total of 394 approving it and 77 protesting it, a network spokesman said. "People are much more apt to complain, so that is a surprise," said the spokesman, Curt Block.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Despite its "strike-proof" fall plans to air the Summer Olympic Games and the World Series instead of new entertainment programming, NBC would have been hit the hardest of the three networks if the Writers Guild of America strike had not reached a tentative end last week, the network's president and chief executive officer Robert C. Wright says. Although entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff, as well as other TV industry observers, have said No.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
A philosophical Lawrence K. Grossman, out as NBC News president after four years, said Thursday he was surprised by the choice of Michael G. Gartner, a print journalist and executive, as his successor. He said he had "no idea" that his bosses would go outside broadcasting, but praised the former Gannett Co. executive and former editor of the Des Moines Register as a serious journalist and fine choice. "I'm very pleased that they picked someone who's obviously serious," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
While Hollywood is the main battlefield in the writers strike, writers and producers acknowledge that three New Yorkers--the chief executives of the three major television networks--wield enormous power in the dispute. To date, ABC, CBS and NBC have backed the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers despite the likely devastation of their fall prime-time schedules.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
While Hollywood is the main battlefield in the writers strike, writers and producers acknowledge that three New Yorkers--the chief executives of the three major television networks--wield enormous power in the dispute. To date, ABC, CBS and NBC have backed the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers despite the likely devastation of their fall prime-time schedules.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
TV critics who grumble about programs may disagree with Robert C. Wright's view of what ails network TV today. Wright says its problems are that "advertising revenues have flattened off, viewership has declined, and programming has increased in cost." But then, his view is corporate, not artistic. He's NBC's new president.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
NBC President Robert C. Wright came to his job from General Electric Co. a year ago this month, and within days had received a performance review from Johnny Carson. After meeting the new boss at NBC's Burbank studios, Carson told his "Tonight Show" audience that Wright seemed like a nice fellow. But Carson wasn't sure about some of the ideas proposed by the one-time GE small-appliance executive--such as replacing "Wheel of Fortune" hostess Vanna White with an electric letter-turner.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1987
Warren Bennis' Viewpoints column on Feb. 8, "Doing Damage at NBC: The Wrong Approach by Mr. Wright," justifiably took Robert C. Wright to task for his pinch-penny methods of managing NBC, to which Wright was recently posted by the network's new owner, General Electric. It seems, however, that Wright and his GE biggies have a different standard when it comes to personal perks, as related in the Neil Morgan column in the San Diego Tribune on Feb. 9: "Delegates to the General Electric convention just ended at Hotel Del Coronado built a reputation among staff as the hotel's biggest spenders ever."
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