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Robert Caro

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NEWS
March 13, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR
Everything about Lyndon Baines Johnson was outsized. His physical bulk, his energy, his ambition, his tirades, his deceptions and even his ears made Johnson a political mega-force. No less forceful is the work of Robert Caro.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What's an author assigned to sit next to a much more famous person (Gwyneth Paltrow) at a book signing to do? Write about it, of course. "Due to the inflexibility of the alphabet I had the questionable good fortune to be seated directly beside Gwyneth Paltrow," writes Christina Oxenberg on her website.  The event was an authors night held by the East Hampton Library. The tony summer haven on Long Island boasts a long roster of both book-inclined celebrities and stars of the literary world: The event was co-founded by Alec Baldwin and its organizing committee includes bestselling thriller author Nelson DeMille, National Book Award-winning biographer Robert Caro, Orange Prize winning novelist A.M Homes and, yes, Gwyneth Paltrow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Carrie Arcos was mystified when she received an email from the National Book Foundation instructing her to call its office. "I thought I was in trouble or something," said the Los Angeles mother of three. It turned out to be just the opposite. "Out of Reach," her young adult novel about siblings and meth addiction, had been chosen as a finalist for the National Book Awards. "It's so unbelievable to me that this is happening," said Arcos, a first-time novelist. The finalists for the National Book Awards were announced Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What's an author assigned to sit next to a much more famous person (Gwyneth Paltrow) at a book signing to do? Write about it, of course. "Due to the inflexibility of the alphabet I had the questionable good fortune to be seated directly beside Gwyneth Paltrow," writes Christina Oxenberg on her website.  The event was an authors night held by the East Hampton Library. The tony summer haven on Long Island boasts a long roster of both book-inclined celebrities and stars of the literary world: The event was co-founded by Alec Baldwin and its organizing committee includes bestselling thriller author Nelson DeMille, National Book Award-winning biographer Robert Caro, Orange Prize winning novelist A.M Homes and, yes, Gwyneth Paltrow.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they write about the wars over Lyndon Johnson's legacy, future historians may note that the opening salvos weren't fired in the Texas hill country or in the halls of Congress. Instead, they erupted at Lutece, the chic Manhattan restaurant. There, on a cool March night this year, Oxford University Press held a reception for UCLA history professor Robert Dallek on the publication of "Lone Star Rising," his biography of the 36th President.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: How has your relationship to Lyndon Johnson changed over the years? Answer: I don't think it has changed. In the first two volumes, Johnson was concerned with power. In "Master of the Senate," he earns the power, but he's the same man. Lord Acton once said, "Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely." The older I get, the less sure I am about that. Power, whatever else it does, always reveals a character.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Passage of Power The Years of Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Alfred A. Knopf: 736 pp., $35 "The Passage of Power," the fourth volume in Robert Caro's epic biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, encompasses the period of LBJ's deepest humiliation and his greatest accomplishment. It is a searing account of ambition derailed by personal demons in Johnson's unsuccessful bid for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination. It is a painful depiction of "greatness comically humbled" when Johnson gave up his unbridled authority as Senate majority leader to becomeJohn F. Kennedy's disdained vice president.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | LEWIS GOULD, Lewis Gould is the author of numerous books, including "1968: The Election That Changed America," "Lady Bird Johnson: Our Environmental First Lady" and "The Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt." He is currently working on a history of the Republican Party.
How many 20th century American presidents deserve to have four big volumes written about their lives and times? Robert A. Caro decided during the mid-1970s that Lyndon Johnson did, and "Master of the Senate" is the third installment in his massive exploration of the Texas president's quest for power. When Caro started his project a generation ago, Johnson's central place in the nation's history seemed assured.
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Jim Finley
"Johnson materializes as America's true native son, embodying not only many of this country's dominant historical values, but its pathological traits as well."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Passage of Power The Years of Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Alfred A. Knopf: 736 pp., $35 "The Passage of Power," the fourth volume in Robert Caro's epic biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, encompasses the period of LBJ's deepest humiliation and his greatest accomplishment. It is a searing account of ambition derailed by personal demons in Johnson's unsuccessful bid for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination. It is a painful depiction of "greatness comically humbled" when Johnson gave up his unbridled authority as Senate majority leader to becomeJohn F. Kennedy's disdained vice president.
NEWS
April 29, 2002 | MARK ROZZO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm not amenable to change, you know." Robert A. Caro, the tireless author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of builder Robert Moses, "The Power Broker," and now the third volume of his mammoth "The Years of Lyndon Johnson," is talking on a morning of record-breaking April heat in his private Manhattan office overlooking 57th Street.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | LEWIS GOULD, Lewis Gould is the author of numerous books, including "1968: The Election That Changed America," "Lady Bird Johnson: Our Environmental First Lady" and "The Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt." He is currently working on a history of the Republican Party.
How many 20th century American presidents deserve to have four big volumes written about their lives and times? Robert A. Caro decided during the mid-1970s that Lyndon Johnson did, and "Master of the Senate" is the third installment in his massive exploration of the Texas president's quest for power. When Caro started his project a generation ago, Johnson's central place in the nation's history seemed assured.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: How has your relationship to Lyndon Johnson changed over the years? Answer: I don't think it has changed. In the first two volumes, Johnson was concerned with power. In "Master of the Senate," he earns the power, but he's the same man. Lord Acton once said, "Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely." The older I get, the less sure I am about that. Power, whatever else it does, always reveals a character.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they write about the wars over Lyndon Johnson's legacy, future historians may note that the opening salvos weren't fired in the Texas hill country or in the halls of Congress. Instead, they erupted at Lutece, the chic Manhattan restaurant. There, on a cool March night this year, Oxford University Press held a reception for UCLA history professor Robert Dallek on the publication of "Lone Star Rising," his biography of the 36th President.
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Jim Finley
"Johnson materializes as America's true native son, embodying not only many of this country's dominant historical values, but its pathological traits as well."
NEWS
April 29, 2002 | MARK ROZZO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm not amenable to change, you know." Robert A. Caro, the tireless author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of builder Robert Moses, "The Power Broker," and now the third volume of his mammoth "The Years of Lyndon Johnson," is talking on a morning of record-breaking April heat in his private Manhattan office overlooking 57th Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Carrie Arcos was mystified when she received an email from the National Book Foundation instructing her to call its office. "I thought I was in trouble or something," said the Los Angeles mother of three. It turned out to be just the opposite. "Out of Reach," her young adult novel about siblings and meth addiction, had been chosen as a finalist for the National Book Awards. "It's so unbelievable to me that this is happening," said Arcos, a first-time novelist. The finalists for the National Book Awards were announced Wednesday.
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