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Robert Chien Nan Chan

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NEWS
January 10, 1993 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 17 years of Stuart A. Tay's life could not have been more strikingly different than his last day alive. The bespectacled honors student with a renaissance range of talent lay crumpled in a muddy back yard grave in Buena Park on a chilly New Year's Eve, his reputation soon to be tarnished by whispers of a robbery plan gone sour and a love triangle involving his accused killer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge on Friday ordered three teen-agers to undergo diagnostic testing at the California Youth Authority before they are sentenced for their roles in the 1992 New Year's Eve murder of honor student Stuart A. Tay. Orange County Superior Court Judge Kathleen E. O'Leary will use the reports to determine whether the teen-agers should be sentenced as adults--and possibly face life in prison--or as teen-agers, in which case they could be released when they turn 25.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arraignment for Robert Chien-Nan Chan, the alleged ringleader in the murder of high school honor student Stuart A. Tay, was postponed Friday because his new attorney has not yet reviewed all the paperwork pertaining to the case. Chan's attorney, Marshall Schulman, said his client would plead not guilty at his arraignment Jan. 29. Four other juvenile suspects have pleaded not guilty to murder charges, and they face a hearing Feb. 5 to determine whether they will be tried as adults.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The teen-age mastermind of one of Orange County's most unsettling murders was sentenced Monday to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the slaying of a 17-year-old honors student. Robert Chan, 19, a onetime high school valedictorian candidate, sat impassively as the judge handed down the sentence for the 1992 New Year's Eve killing of Stuart A. Tay of Orange.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attorney representing a youth implicated in the savage murder of a high school honors student lashed out Friday at police and other defense attorneys who have publicly suggested that his client was the mastermind of the crime. "I don't think there is any evidence (in the case) that deserves this type of finger-pointing," said C. Thomas McDonald, who is representing 18-year-old Robert Chien-Nan Chan. "I think it's totally irresponsible to make such charges."
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury took less than three hours Tuesday to find a teen-ager guilty of first-degree murder for orchestrating the 1992 New Year's Eve ambush slaying of high school honors student Stuart A. Tay. Robert Chan, 19, of Fullerton, a onetime candidate for valedictorian, now faces life in prison without parole for his role in Tay's death. The 17-year-old Orange resident was beaten with baseball bats, forced to swallow rubbing alcohol and then left to die in a shallow grave in a Buena Park back yard.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | MATT LAIT and KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 800 people crowded into the Sunny Hills High School gymnasium Wednesday night seeking answers to questions that have haunted them since the arrest of five students there for the brutal slaying of Stuart A. Tay. The emotional crowd, still reeling from the New Year's Eve killing of the Foothill High School honor student, included students and parents who worried aloud about safety, the presence of gangs and the availability of drugs and weapons on campus.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ and DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like others his age, Robert Chien-Nan Chan faced the usual highs and lows of life as a teen-ager. But unlike most, he rose above the crowd and was often considered among the best. He traded his eighth-grade violin for cleats to join the football squad during his first two years at Fullerton's Sunny Hills High School. Though a mediocre player, teammates say his hard work and determination earned him the respect of the stars on the team.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ and DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like others his age, Robert Chien-Nan Chan faced the usual highs and lows of life as a teen-ager. But unlike most, he rose above the crowd and was often considered among the best. He traded his eighth-grade violin for cleats to join the football squad his first two years at Fullerton's Sunny Hills High School. Teammates say he was a mediocre player, but his hard work and determination earned him the respect of the stars on the team.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Chan was one of the brightest students to ever walk the halls at Sunny Hills High School in Fullerton but he was also typical teen: He agonized over acne and clothes and had to work up the nerve to ask out a pretty cheerleader. "I don't date, you know, I don't know any girls," Chan told a Superior Court jury, shrugging shyly and looking boyish in a pale yellow sweater with a white collar peeking over the top.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The teen-age mastermind of one of Orange County's most shocking murders was sentenced Monday to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the slaying of a 17-year-old honors student. Robert Chan, 19, a onetime high school valedictorian candidate, sat impassively as the judge pronounced the sentencing for the 1992 New Year's Eve killing of Stuart A. Tay of Orange.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Chan was one of the brightest students to ever walk the halls at Sunny Hills High School in Fullerton but he was also typical teen: He agonized over acne and clothes and had to work up the nerve to ask out a pretty cheerleader. "I don't date, you know, I don't know any girls," Chan told a Superior Court jury, shrugging shyly and looking boyish in a pale yellow sweater with a white collar peeking over the top.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury took less than three hours Tuesday to find a teen-ager guilty of first-degree murder for orchestrating the 1992 New Year's Eve ambush murder of an Orange County honors student. Robert Chan, 19, a onetime candidate for class valedictorian, faces life in prison without parole for his role in the killing of Stuart A. Tay of Orange. The 17-year-old was beaten, forced to drink rubbing alcohol and buried in a shallow grave in a Buena Park back yard.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury took less than three hours Tuesday to find a teen-ager guilty of first-degree murder for orchestrating the 1992 New Year's Eve ambush slaying of high school honors student Stuart A. Tay. Robert Chan, 19, of Fullerton, a onetime candidate for valedictorian, now faces life in prison without parole for his role in Tay's death. The 17-year-old Orange resident was beaten with baseball bats, forced to swallow rubbing alcohol and then left to die in a shallow grave in a Buena Park back yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors were asked Monday to choose between first-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter convictions for a teen-ager accused of masterminding the 1992 New Year's Eve slaying of honor student Stuart A. Tay. Deputy Dist. Atty. Lewis R. Rosenblum told the Orange County Superior Court jury that it could disregard the prosecution's entire case and still have enough evidence from Robert Chan's own testimony to prove he is guilty of murdering Tay, 17, of Orange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Chan, the teen-ager accused of masterminding the 1992 New Year's Eve slaying of a high school honor student, testified for the first time Wednesday that he helped four other youths bludgeon and bury the victim but claimed he was only following orders. Chan, 19, told an Orange County Superior Court jury that he joined in the slaying because he believed the victim, Stuart A. Tay, had rigged his Fullerton home with explosives and was going to kill him.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the sun had risen Monday, Detectives Matt Miller and Jorge Desouza were knocking on Kirn Kim's door. Kim, a junior at Sunny Hills High School, had reportedly told a friend that he knew what happened to Foothill High School honor student Stuart A. Tay, missing since New Year's Eve. Kim, 16, accompanied the detectives to the Orange Police Department. His father, Dr. Yong Ho Kim, waited in the lobby.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The teen-age mastermind of one of Orange County's most unsettling murders was sentenced Monday to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the slaying of a 17-year-old honors student. Robert Chan, 19, a onetime high school valedictorian candidate, sat impassively as the judge handed down the sentence for the 1992 New Year's Eve killing of Stuart A. Tay of Orange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 19-year-old accused of masterminding the killing of 17-year-old student Stuart A. Tay suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and was convinced Tay had rigged his home with explosives that could detonate at any time, a psychologist testified Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school honors student Stuart A. Tay may have suffered for as long as one hour before dying on New Year's Eve, 1992, after being brutally beaten and made to drink rubbing alcohol, the county's chief pathologist testified Monday. In often graphic testimony, pathologist Richard I.
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