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Robert Chow

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BUSINESS
March 12, 2003 | James Flanigan
For most people thinking about war and terrorism, any mention of the word "cell" conjures up thoughts of enemy agents in our midst. For Dr. Robert Chow, however, the word brings to mind something altogether different: a chance to give hope to the gravely ill. Chow is chairman of StemCyte Inc., an Arcadia start-up firm that specializes in using cord blood stem cells -- the kind taken from the umbilical cords of newborns -- to help treat cancer patients.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2003 | James Flanigan
For most people thinking about war and terrorism, any mention of the word "cell" conjures up thoughts of enemy agents in our midst. For Dr. Robert Chow, however, the word brings to mind something altogether different: a chance to give hope to the gravely ill. Chow is chairman of StemCyte Inc., an Arcadia start-up firm that specializes in using cord blood stem cells -- the kind taken from the umbilical cords of newborns -- to help treat cancer patients.
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NEWS
May 11, 1989
Being a narcotics detective with a South Bay police department, I read with disgust the profile of defense attorney J. Tony Serra ("Counterculture's Warrior Lawyer," by Robert Chow, May 3). Spending a good part of my normal work week in court, I have come to respect the role of the professional defense attorney. Any accused person deserves an advocate and the defense attorney's duty to represent his client results in the protection of our Constitution and Bill of Rights. The defense attorney in effect works for every citizen.
NEWS
May 12, 1989
The recent article about Tony Serra, the defense attorney who smokes marijuana, served time in federal prison and abandons cars rather than pay parking tickets into the thousands of dollars, certainly adds new meaning to the term criminal lawyer ("Counterculture's Warrior Lawyer" by Robert Chow, May 3). This outstanding example of the California Bar was quoted as saying, "I'll try any case that comes along. If you kill a cop, I'll pay to take the case." Serra also "respects drug dealers because the heart of what they're trying to do is better their condition.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writers
Former winery worker Ramon Salcido was arraigned Friday on charges that he shot and killed his wife and a supervisor and used a knife to murder his two daughters and three other family members in last week's rampage through Sonoma County. Salcido, wearing a maroon jail-issued jumpsuit, spoke softly and only briefly in his first court appearance since being arrested Wednesday in his grandmother's hometown in northern Mexico. He was returned to the United States by private jet Thursday night.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writers
Pre-dawn firebombs hurled through windows Tuesday damaged two Berkeley book stores, one a literary and political landmark whose owner had vowed publicly to resist Islamic pressure to stop selling "The Satanic Verses," as violence apparently broke out around the Salman Rushdie novel.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the great truths of Wall Street is that what is hot today will probably be freezing cold tomorrow. And nothing could better underscore the point than second-quarter mutual fund results released Tuesday by Lipper Analytical Services. The quarter's hot performers: gold and precious metals funds. These are largely the same funds that plunged in the first quarter when stock prices soared. Strategic Investments' gold fund fared the best, posting a 34.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writers
Ramon Salcido, the California winery worker wanted in last week's slayings of six family members and his supervisor, was arrested peacefully at a roadblock near his hometown in northern Mexico and quickly confessed, a spokesman for the Mexican attorney general's office said Wednesday. Salcido, 28, was taken into custody late Tuesday night near Guasave by Federal Judicial Police "by chance . . . in a police anti-narcotics operation," said the spokesman, Fernando Arias. 'Extremely Nervous' "He arrived without identification and he became extremely nervous," Arias said.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2005 | By Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
The courier arrived just after midnight with a bag of blood collected from a fresh umbilical cord. Inside the laboratory at Family Cord Blood Services in Santa Monica, a worker siphoned off red cells, leaving a dilute mixture of stem cells — a personal supply for Olivia Michelle Boyd, born 15 hours earlier in Honolulu. Her parents, Stephanie and Anthony Boyd, had agreed to pay the company $1,265 to harvest the material and $115 a year to preserve it in a stainless steel tank filled with liquid nitrogen.
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