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Robert Clay

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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Robert Clay is a bit of an iconoclast. He is a marketing communications specialist who has shrunk his business at a time when the formation of big agencies seems to be the rule. He is a public relations and advertising man who in the early 1970s attempted to launch a nationwide boycott of retailers who advertised Christmas sales before the Thanksgiving season had ended.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Robert Clay is a bit of an iconoclast. He is a marketing communications specialist who has shrunk his business at a time when the formation of big agencies seems to be the rule. He is a public relations and advertising man who in the early 1970s attempted to launch a nationwide boycott of retailers who advertised Christmas sales before the Thanksgiving season had ended.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 1988 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Even newspapers are not immune from linguistic glitches, as noted by longtime PR and marketing specialist Robert Clay. Seems that we have unthinkingly picked up a term coined by the real estate industry by referring in stories about Orange County's soaring housing prices to the sale of "existing" homes. Clay recently issued a mock press release touting the stability of the market for "non-existing" homes.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1988 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Even newspapers are not immune from linguistic glitches, as noted by longtime PR and marketing specialist Robert Clay. Seems that we have unthinkingly picked up a term coined by the real estate industry by referring in stories about Orange County's soaring housing prices to the sale of "existing" homes. Clay recently issued a mock press release touting the stability of the market for "non-existing" homes.
OPINION
July 21, 2002
Re "Transforming a Symbol of Tragedy," July 17: I'm calling for everyone's support to reject all six proposals for rebuilding at the World Trade Center site. They have some merit in that they all incorporate a large, green memorial park. However, none of them propose a building as high as the soaring 110-story twin towers. Why are Americans cowering in the face of terror? Rebuild the towers as big, if not bigger, than before. That is the American way. Robert D. Clay Jamul, Calif.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
A woman accused of burying her son in the backyard of her home faces charges--not for disposing of the body--but for allegedly misleading investigators. Beverly Johnson was charged after the body of her son Robert Clay Johnson Jr. was found Nov. 10 in a shallow grave behind the Las Vegas tract home they shared, police Sgt. Kevin Manning said. A Clark County coroner's report shows Johnson died of a drug overdose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1987
Currently, there is an uproar in southern Orange County about home-builders' signs, both the small staked signs and bus bench or bus shelter signs, which provide an obvious public service. This is yet another example of the selfish attitude too prevalent in society today. While those who protest are crusading under the environmentalism banner, their real motivation may be summed up by the phrase: "I got my home, but I don't want you to get yours." The truth is that all home-builders' signs provide a public service, since they direct home shoppers to the new homes they are looking for. An abundance of housing industry research shows that the majority of home buyers find their new homes via signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1988
Measure A, Orange County's so-called Sensible Growth and Traffic Control Initiative, should be defeated. Recent opinion polls have shown that the primary reason people want to vote for this awful initiative is to solve our traffic problems. If you really want to do that, vote for three things: Proposition 72, which will require the state to use motor-vehicle fuels sales tax revenues only for street, highway, and mass transit purposes. Proposition 74, which will provide $1 billion for transportation, including freeway projects here in the county and the next ballot measure--whenever it comes up--that calls for an increase in gasoline taxes with all the increased revenue spent to solve transportation problems.
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than 40 hours of testimony over a three-month period, five trainers have been fined $500 apiece and one has been fined $750 for running horses at Santa Anita and Los Alamitos that tested positive for scopolamine, a prohibited drug.
SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
The horses that finished one-two in last year's Breeders' Cup Distaff will face off again in Wednesday's $350,000 Apple Blossom Handicap at Oaklawn Park. Only two others dared to challenge Bayakoa and Gorgeous for the 1 1/16-mile Apple Blossom, which carries the nation's second-highest purse for a filly-mare race. The other entries, both with local experience, are Affirmed Classic and Motion in Limine.
SPORTS
October 30, 2004 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
Silver Charm, the winner of the 1997 Kentucky Derby and Preakness, has been sold and will continue his career as a stallion in Japan. The 10-year-old son of Silver Buck, who hasn't been a particularly successful sire at Three Chimneys Farm in Midway, Ky., since his retirement from racing in 1999, was sold to the Japan Racing Assn. for an undisclosed price. Robert Clay, the syndicate manager, announced the sale.
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