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Robert Cohen

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November 13, 1988 | Sonja Bolle, Bolle is a free-lance writer. and
To the arsenal of "postmodern" literary labels I would like to add the term postfeminist and apply it to Robert Cohen's fascinating novel, "The Organ Builder." Cohen's hero, like the heroes of so many first novels, is a young man coming to terms with his early life; his journey is a quest for an absent father whose memory he has long repressed.
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October 20, 2002 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
If there is a single place where the counterculture of the 1960s first snapped into focus, it is Sproul Plaza on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. There, on Oct. 1, 1964, a crowd of students gathered around a police car to prevent the arrest of an activist who had defied a newly imposed university policy that prohibited political advocacy on campus.
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BOOKS
March 10, 1996 | Judith Freeman, Judith Freeman's new novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," will be published by Pantheon in May
We all get tired of living in the past, but apparently the past never tires of living in us," says Sam Karnish, the narrator of Robert Cohen's new novel, "The Here and Now." This is a story about such conundrums, how the past is never really past but sticks around to haunt us, while the present flies by in a largely unreadable blur and is instantly consigned to history. This richly comic and philosophical work focuses on the notion of tradition in an angst-ridden present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cohen enjoys a reputation as a Renaissance man of the theater. Now the UC Irvine drama professor wants the playgoing public to enjoy Niccolo Machiavelli, a Renaissance man of the Renaissance. "The Prince," written and directed by Cohen, is playing through Feb. 3 in a student production at UCI. It tells the story of the man behind the notorious name--the 16th-century Florentine statesman, comic playwright and political philosopher whose main legacy, for the general public, is an adjective.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
Legend has it that as Mozart lay dying, he would follow the score of "The Magic Flute" as it played nightly in Emanuel Schikaneder's Theater an der Wien in Vienna. Mozart was supposed to have laughed and wept as he turned the pages to coincide with the events of the performances. This story has been appropriated and recast by Robert Cohen, chairman of the UC Irvine drama department, for a new production of "The Magic Flute" that opens Thursday at the Fine Arts Village Theatre.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's brother was defending himself when he shot an armed intruder, prosecutors said as they announced charges against the wounded man and two others. Dist. Atty. Christopher Almy said in Bangor the three suspects were arrested and an investigation produced "no basis" for charging Robert Cohen, 51. Michael Chasse, 22, was released from a hospital, where he had been treated for what police said were several wounds.
NEWS
July 19, 1986
Former West Hollywood restaurateur H. Daniel Whitman was convicted Friday--for the second time--of conspiring to kill a witness in a federal ticket-scalping investigation. A federal court jury in Los Angeles found Whitman, 55, guilty of conspiracy to commit murder, witness-tampering, retaliating against a federal witness and conspiracy to deprive a witness of his civil rights. U.S. District Judge Francis C. Whelan set sentencing for Aug. 12, and permitted Whitman to remain free on bail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cohen enjoys a reputation as a Renaissance man of the theater. Now the UC Irvine drama professor wants the playgoing public to enjoy Niccolo Machiavelli, a Renaissance man of the Renaissance. "The Prince," written and directed by Cohen, is playing through Feb. 3 in a student production at UCI. It tells the story of the man behind the notorious name--the 16th-century Florentine statesman, comic playwright and political philosopher whose main legacy, for the general public, is an adjective.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The comedy of No Time isn't sketch or stand-up or improv. It isn't anything, really, so much as good fun in very questionable taste. Billy Portman, 29, Chas Mastin, 27, and Robert Cohen, 29, have been performing together since they met as students at George Washington University and started doing midnight comedy shows on campus. Nearly a decade later, their act still has the loose, raw feel of something cooked up over many late nights of pizza and controlled substances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office on Wednesday spurned the confession of a woman who claimed that she and several friends were responsible for the 1988 slaying of Carol Montecalvo, whose husband was convicted last year of the murder. The prosecutor in the case said that Suzan Brown, 45, was lying when she suddenly stepped forward last month and confessed her role in the fatal shooting of Montecalvo in her Burbank home. "After an extensive investigation of Ms.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Although some rolled their eyes when Paul McCartney decided that he wanted to make an impact in the classical field, there isn't any doubt now that his commitment is genuine. And he is doing some good beyond the scope of his own work, as evidenced by this often touching anthology of new choral pieces by nine of Britain's leading composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The comedy of No Time isn't sketch or stand-up or improv. It isn't anything, really, so much as good fun in very questionable taste. Billy Portman, 29, Chas Mastin, 27, and Robert Cohen, 29, have been performing together since they met as students at George Washington University and started doing midnight comedy shows on campus. Nearly a decade later, their act still has the loose, raw feel of something cooked up over many late nights of pizza and controlled substances.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's brother was defending himself when he shot an armed intruder, prosecutors said as they announced charges against the wounded man and two others. Dist. Atty. Christopher Almy said in Bangor the three suspects were arrested and an investigation produced "no basis" for charging Robert Cohen, 51. Michael Chasse, 22, was released from a hospital, where he had been treated for what police said were several wounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1960s, comic Bert Lahr appeared in Aristophanes' "The Birds" at the ill-fated Ypsilanti Greek Theatre Festival in Michigan. He had signed his contract on the basis of the very funny, exuberant translation by critic Walter Kerr that he had been given. By the time Lahr reached Ypsilanti, however, the artistic director had chosen a more scholarly translation, by William Arrowsmith. Lahr was livid. "It was stilted and dull," Lahr said. "There weren't any jokes in it."
BOOKS
March 10, 1996 | Judith Freeman, Judith Freeman's new novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," will be published by Pantheon in May
We all get tired of living in the past, but apparently the past never tires of living in us," says Sam Karnish, the narrator of Robert Cohen's new novel, "The Here and Now." This is a story about such conundrums, how the past is never really past but sticks around to haunt us, while the present flies by in a largely unreadable blur and is instantly consigned to history. This richly comic and philosophical work focuses on the notion of tradition in an angst-ridden present.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1994 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legal Aid lawyers in Orange County are probably best known for suing local officials who try to ban the homeless. That enrages conservatives, many of whom oppose the idea of lawyers getting paid by government to sue government. But local Legal Aid does a lot of other things for the 15,000 poor people who come though its doors each year--from divorces to going after scam artists who prey on the poor. Staff writer Michael Flagg visited the Santa Ana office of executive director Robert J.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1960s, comic Bert Lahr appeared in Aristophanes' "The Birds" at the ill-fated Ypsilanti Greek Theatre Festival in Michigan. He had signed his contract on the basis of the very funny, exuberant translation by critic Walter Kerr that he had been given. By the time Lahr reached Ypsilanti, however, the artistic director had chosen a more scholarly translation, by William Arrowsmith. Lahr was livid. "It was stilted and dull," Lahr said. "There weren't any jokes in it."
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | BARBARA MARSH
Occasionally, a feisty consumer will go to great lengths to fight the system. Robert C. Cohen, who runs Intech Summit Group, a San Diego health care consulting firm, says he lost 21 days of work--and an estimated $22,000 in business income--because his three-year treatment program of allergy shots was disrupted after he switched last year to PacifiCare. Under the coverage provided through his wife's employer, Cohen says his primary are physician pulled him off the final year's worth of shots.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Can acting be taught?" asks UC Irvine drama professor Robert E. Cohen, posing a question he has answered with distinction. It is a question Cohen asks on the first page of his 216-page book, "Acting One," and answers with lessons on diction, body language, stage fright, approach, memorization methods, cues, techniques and liberation.
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