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June 15, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Everyone keeps asking me, 'Aren't you thrilled,' but being thrilled is for amateurs," says artist Robert Colescott, who'll represent the U.S. at the 47th Venice Biennale, which opens today. "This is what I do, and Venice is a job." That's not entirely accurate. Colescott's presence at the prestigious Italian international exhibition is also something of an honor in that it is the result of a rigorous screening process conducted by the Fund for U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Robert Colescott, a wildly expressive and fearlessly opinionated painter who skewered racial and sexual stereotypes with hilarious force, has died. He was 83. Colescott, who had suffered from Parkinsonian syndrome, died June 4 at his home in Tucson, said Marc Wehby, co-director of Kravets/Wehby Gallery in New York, where the artist had shown his work in recent years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997
Kristine McKenna's article "Our Man in Venice" (June 15) gives an interesting look into Robert Colescott's views and feelings on art and life, but the vivid memory of the World's Fair on Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay in 1939-40 was the Golden Gate International Exposition. The World's Fair was held in New York. He would have enjoyed that fair as well. ALFREDO and MATHEL IMMELLA Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997
Kristine McKenna's article "Our Man in Venice" (June 15) gives an interesting look into Robert Colescott's views and feelings on art and life, but the vivid memory of the World's Fair on Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay in 1939-40 was the Golden Gate International Exposition. The World's Fair was held in New York. He would have enjoyed that fair as well. ALFREDO and MATHEL IMMELLA Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
According to Robert Colescott, the three graces are art, sex and death, but you'd never guess he felt that way from a casual glance at one of his paintings. Humor is the first card his pictures play and they come on as bright and lovably goofy as a lumberjack in a Hawaiian-print shirt. But first impressions aren't always accurate; Colescott's work is, in fact, a highly informed if cartoonish recasting of history that's rife with arcane references.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Colescott never has been a painter who pulled punches. He consistently takes ironic, disturbing jabs at historic American racial stereotypes and the hidden politics of exclusion. As usual, in these vividly graphic paintings at the Linda Cathcart Gallery in Santa Monica, Colescott renders his critical barbs in a glib, cartoonish style of figurative expression that is part comic book, part naive art and complete satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Imagine Botticelli's and Veronese's nude Venuses rolled into one and transformed into a voluptuous African fertility goddess. Picture Rodin's "The Thinker" as a black lumberjack, sitting on a stump and dreaming of a buxom woman in a bright pink bikini. Fancy Shirley Temple as a black girl wearing a lei and a grass skirt, dancing the hula on the beach while Bill Robinson, her dancing partner in movies, grins on the horizon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Robert Colescott, a wildly expressive and fearlessly opinionated painter who skewered racial and sexual stereotypes with hilarious force, has died. He was 83. Colescott, who had suffered from Parkinsonian syndrome, died June 4 at his home in Tucson, said Marc Wehby, co-director of Kravets/Wehby Gallery in New York, where the artist had shown his work in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Artist Robert Colescott is well known for painting broad lampoons of racial stereotypes. Always appreciated by insiders, he came to wider notice in the late '70s with a series of pastiche variations of historical works such as his "George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware." He winced at its mention during a recent interview. Artists get a little prickly when they are too closely identified with a single image, and for good reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | MARLENA DONOHUE
New Yorker Philemona Williamson uses a exotic palette to paint enchanting scenes that look like childhood or subconscious impressions filtered through her sensual sagacity. Populated with cartoon-y folk art figures that are more robust and tensile than those of Robert Colescott, her canvases depict a young black girl awkwardly maneuvering one high heel and one bare foot, crawling over furniture amidst curious toy puppets, always eyeing the antics of grown-ups who often hide behind bizarre masks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Everyone keeps asking me, 'Aren't you thrilled,' but being thrilled is for amateurs," says artist Robert Colescott, who'll represent the U.S. at the 47th Venice Biennale, which opens today. "This is what I do, and Venice is a job." That's not entirely accurate. Colescott's presence at the prestigious Italian international exhibition is also something of an honor in that it is the result of a rigorous screening process conducted by the Fund for U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Artist Robert Colescott is well known for painting broad lampoons of racial stereotypes. Always appreciated by insiders, he came to wider notice in the late '70s with a series of pastiche variations of historical works such as his "George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware." He winced at its mention during a recent interview. Artists get a little prickly when they are too closely identified with a single image, and for good reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Colescott never has been a painter who pulled punches. He consistently takes ironic, disturbing jabs at historic American racial stereotypes and the hidden politics of exclusion. As usual, in these vividly graphic paintings at the Linda Cathcart Gallery in Santa Monica, Colescott renders his critical barbs in a glib, cartoonish style of figurative expression that is part comic book, part naive art and complete satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
"Merry Xmas Happy New Year to Bob Jan 1973" reads the inscription on Joan Brown's ragged wash drawing of a nude wearing black gloves frosted with watery white squiggles. If Bob grew sufficiently tired of the piece to consign it to a gallery, it's hard to blame him.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Imagine Botticelli's and Veronese's nude Venuses rolled into one and transformed into a voluptuous African fertility goddess. Picture Rodin's "The Thinker" as a black lumberjack, sitting on a stump and dreaming of a buxom woman in a bright pink bikini. Fancy Shirley Temple as a black girl wearing a lei and a grass skirt, dancing the hula on the beach while Bill Robinson, her dancing partner in movies, grins on the horizon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1995 | TIM MAY
The San Fernando Valley branch of the National Council of Negro Women will sponsor a trip for young women to an art exhibition of images of African American men at the UCLA Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center. Registration is free, but reservations are required. The trip, which is limited to young women ages 14 through 19, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Transportation, lunch and an exhibition catalogue will be provided.
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