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Robert Cormier

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cormier grew up in a small Massachusetts town where he was chased by dogs and terrorized by bullies. Much later he drew on the dark places in his life to create fiction for young adults that was groundbreaking in its unsparing realism. The death of the acclaimed author of "The Chocolate War" and "I Am the Cheese" on Nov. 2 in Boston brought sadness to a legion of admirers, who said Cormier's defiance of the formula happy endings for juvenile fiction set a new tone for an entire field.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cormier grew up in a small Massachusetts town where he was chased by dogs and terrorized by bullies. Much later he drew on the dark places in his life to create fiction for young adults that was groundbreaking in its unsparing realism. The death of the acclaimed author of "The Chocolate War" and "I Am the Cheese" on Nov. 2 in Boston brought sadness to a legion of admirers, who said Cormier's defiance of the formula happy endings for juvenile fiction set a new tone for an entire field.
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NEWS
May 26, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fictional world of author Robert Cormier, there are no positive role models. No friendly adults willing to lend a helping hand to teens. No happy endings. This is a good thing, the author for young adults insists, because it's real--and kids know it. "I get an awful lot of mail from my readers, and I get phone calls," said Cormier, 73, whose 17th novel, "Heroes" (Delacorte Press), is due in August. "The kids say, 'You tell it like it is.'
NEWS
June 2, 1998
Re "Unhappily Ever After" by Lynn Smith (May 26): I have read several Robert Cormier novels and have found them well-written but disturbing. For young adolescents particularly, I think they may be dangerous. "The Chocolate War" presents such a bleak view of life that, as my son put it, "You might as well just kill yourself." UCLA professor Virginia Walter's statement, "If there's no hope, at least there's no false hope, which is worse," is grim. Michael Cart, president of the Young Adult Library Services Assn.
BOOKS
March 26, 1989 | Kristiana Gregory, Gregory reviews regularly for The Times. and
First off, I loved "Fade." Couldn't put it down. There's no question that Robert Cormier is an exquisite, tight writer, as proven in his celebrated "The Chocolate War" (1974) and now, in this fantasy that Delacorte Press is marketing for age 12 and up. It is, however, twice as long as the average young adult book and there are passages that will make some parents jump from their seats. "Fade" is not for kids.
NEWS
June 2, 1998
Re "Unhappily Ever After" by Lynn Smith (May 26): I have read several Robert Cormier novels and have found them well-written but disturbing. For young adolescents particularly, I think they may be dangerous. "The Chocolate War" presents such a bleak view of life that, as my son put it, "You might as well just kill yourself." UCLA professor Virginia Walter's statement, "If there's no hope, at least there's no false hope, which is worse," is grim. Michael Cart, president of the Young Adult Library Services Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga
The poetry of the 18th century writer Robert Burns continues to attract composers. Choral veteran Robert DeCormier is only the latest; his cantata, "The Jolly Beggars," occupies more than half of this engaging, handsomely sung and played recording, with sharply enunciated texts consistently brought forward in the performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga
The poetry of the 18th century writer Robert Burns continues to attract composers. Choral veteran Robert DeCormier is only the latest; his cantata, "The Jolly Beggars," occupies more than half of this engaging, handsomely sung and played recording, with sharply enunciated texts consistently brought forward in the performances.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fictional world of author Robert Cormier, there are no positive role models. No friendly adults willing to lend a helping hand to teens. No happy endings. This is a good thing, the author for young adults insists, because it's real--and kids know it. "I get an awful lot of mail from my readers, and I get phone calls," said Cormier, 73, whose 17th novel, "Heroes" (Delacorte Press), is due in August. "The kids say, 'You tell it like it is.'
BOOKS
March 26, 1989 | Kristiana Gregory, Gregory reviews regularly for The Times. and
First off, I loved "Fade." Couldn't put it down. There's no question that Robert Cormier is an exquisite, tight writer, as proven in his celebrated "The Chocolate War" (1974) and now, in this fantasy that Delacorte Press is marketing for age 12 and up. It is, however, twice as long as the average young adult book and there are passages that will make some parents jump from their seats. "Fade" is not for kids.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
Here are some of the books that have been the subject of censorship attempts, according to the American Library Assn: * Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." * Judy Blume's "Blubber." * Robert Cormier's "Chocolate War." * Roald Dahl's "James and the Giant Peach." * Bret Easton Ellis' "American Psycho." * Walter A. Elwell's "Evangelical Commentary on the Bible." * William Faulkner's "As I Lay Dying." * Mem Fox's "Guess What?" * S. E. Hinton's "Rumble Fish."
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