Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Cornthwaite
IN THE NEWS

Robert Cornthwaite

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Robert Cornthwaite, a character actor whose more than 50-year career in theater, films and television included roles in classic thrillers and thrilling classics, has died. He was 89. Cornthwaite died of natural causes Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, according to Jennifer Fagen, a spokeswoman for the home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Robert Cornthwaite, a character actor whose more than 50-year career in theater, films and television included roles in classic thrillers and thrilling classics, has died. He was 89. Cornthwaite died of natural causes Thursday at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, according to Jennifer Fagen, a spokeswoman for the home.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
In a career spanning more than five decades, Robert Cornthwaite has played roles as different as the mad scientist in the 1951 horror movie "The Thing" and the eccentric grandfather in the 1991 revival of Moss Hart's and George Kaufman's "You Can't Take It With You" at South Coast Repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
In a career spanning more than five decades, Robert Cornthwaite has played roles as different as the mad scientist in the 1951 horror movie "The Thing" and the eccentric grandfather in the 1991 revival of Moss Hart's and George Kaufman's "You Can't Take It With You" at South Coast Repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987
What a fabulous collection the Wortham Theater Center in Houston houses ("A Private Collection With Soul," by William Wilson, June 14)! Not only does the De Menil Collection contain works from the 14th Century, but even a piece from the 27th!! How could someone get a hold of a Sumerian statue from the year 2600? I'm thoroughly impressed. Thank you for showing us this work of art (and wonder of time travel!). SOPHIE FOXMAN Canoga Park Robert Cornthwaite of Hesperia also spied the error.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1987
Let's not be beastly to the royals. For myself, I'm all on the side of King Carlos III. It would be very ungrateful of me if I were not, seeing that he sheltered me for many years in the city he ordained, El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, and for several weeks in the palace he built at Caserta when he was King of Naples and the Two Sicilies. During World War II the royal palace at Caserta was headquarters for the Mediterranean Allied Air Forces in Italy. But some GIs were not kind to the palace and its furnishings, so everyone was ordered out of the palace and into a tent city set up in a nearby swamp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2002 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Tobey, who co-starred in the 1950s science-fiction classic "The Thing From Another World" and the '50s television series "The Whirlybirds," has died. He was 85. The veteran character actor and B-movie hero died Sunday at a Rancho Mirage hospital after a lengthy illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It had to be tantalizing for officials at the Pasadena Playhouse, where the West Coast premiere of Preston Sturges' 1931 comedy, "A Cup of Coffee," opened Sunday, to know that, circa 1940, this play had briefly been destined for . . . . the Pasadena Playhouse. "A Cup of Coffee" never made it to Pasadena, becoming instead a Paramount Pictures film retitled "Christmas in July." No stage version happened until New York's Soho Rep and director Larry Carpenter exhumed and staged the play in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Film writer and director Preston Sturges was a comic genius. But you wouldn't know it from "A Cup of Coffee," the Pasadena Playhouse season opener at the Poway Center for the Performing Arts. There are glimmers of brilliance in this 1930-something script about a coffee salesman who mistakenly thinks he's won $25,000 in a coffee slogan contest. Thanks to an impeccable cast with terrific timing, even the most obvious of jokes gets laughs. But most of the jokes are as obvious as the plot twists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaving "The Caretaker" at South Coast Repertory the other night, a man was overheard asking his companion, "But why do this play now ?" The answer was inaudible. And the question was one that Harold Pinter might not relish. Like most playwrights, he has said that he wants his work to speak for itself, without any extraneous layers of topical meaning. In Paul Marcus' staging, "The Caretaker" does speak for itself, very eloquently.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The longer I worked, the more certain I felt that as improbable as it might seem, there were moments when an individual conscience was all that could keep a world from falling. --Arthur Miller, "Timebends" Almost as gripping as the play itself is Arthur Miller's account, in his incisive memoir "Timebends," of how and why he set about writing "The Crucible" in 1953. And every bit as gripping as it ought to be is Martin Benson's current production of the play at South Coast Repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Director Mark Lamos dresses up his actors in "The School for Wives" at the La Jolla Playhouse to suggest silent-movie archetypes. Arnolphe (Gerry Bamman) makes us think of Chaplin, with his derby hat and mustache. His ward, Agnes (Barbara Howard), might be Mary Pickford. The gimmick doesn't particularly serve the story.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|