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Robert Crumb

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April 23, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
'People who want to be famous don't know what they're getting into," artist Robert Crumb told this reporter during a 1989 interview. "Once I got famous I saw a side of humanity I'd never seen before--people who don't even know your work want to glom onto you just because you're famous. It's a nauseating aspect of human nature that people worship power, and it's one of the things about mankind I find truly reprehensible."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In 1980, R. Crumb produced a set of 36 trading cards called “Heroes of the Blues.” It's a great little set, backing Crumb's drawings with short biographical sketches of performers such as Blind Blake , Charlie Patton , Big Bill Broonzy and Peetie Wheatstraw . If there's any downside to the project, it's that it doesn't cover enough territory. Only 36 musicians? That barely scratches the surface of this most quintessential of American folk art forms. As it turns out, this is the motivation for William Stout's “Legends of the Blues,” coming May 7 from Abrams ComicArts, which picks up where Crumb left off. Featuring 100 musicians, the book has little overlap with “Heroes ...” -- save, as Stout says, “ Skip James and Blind Willie Johnson , two bluesmen I just couldn't bear to leave out” -- making the projects complementary in the most fundamental sense.
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BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Robin V. Russin, Russin, a Rhodes scholar, taught art history and drawing for several years. He is now a practicing artist and screenwriter
I believe it was Pat Oliphant who in a recently televised speech announced that we are now living in a golden age--of cartoonists. He spoke in reference to political cartoonists, but the same applies to the field as a whole. In our short-attention-span, media-oriented culture, cartoons have achieved a new status, whether in the pungent satire of a Garry Trudeau, the bizarre natural history of a Gary Larson or the wry humor of a Bill Watterson. They are filmic, telling their stories frame by frame, but remain manageable, concrete, personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A habitual crank with a pronounced antisocial streak and an aversion to mainstream culture, the director Terry Zwigoff has one of the most distinctive sensibilities in American movies. This past decade, he has collaborated with the cartoonist Daniel Clowes on "Ghost World" (2001), a sardonic chronicle of teenage alienation in strip-mall America, and "Art School Confidential" (2006), a contemptuous attack on art-world strivers, and also directed Billy Bob Thornton in the cult favorite "Bad Santa" (2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995
When the cartoon movie "Fritz the Cat" came out years ago, it looked like the "Felix the Cat" comic strip from the '30s, even with the psychedelic id. Now your "Creep Show" article (by Kristine McKenna, April 23) reveals the man behind this transformation, Robert Crumb. Reading the article, it occurred to me that Crumb's Natural Man is the spitting image of the Professor in the "Sappo" comic strip, again from the '30s. I started to wonder if Crumb does anything original. TOM FREEMAN Colton
NEWS
April 20, 1996
Lynn O'Donnell, 43, producer of the 1995 award-winning documentary "Crumb." A native of Berkeley, O'Donnell studied filmmaking at San Francisco State. Her work included a documentary about Argentinecrooner, composer and actor Carlos Gardel titled "Voices of the Tango" and one about Nobel Prize-winning writer Czeslaw Milosz called "The Poet Remembers."
BUSINESS
December 28, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
An icon of the '60s is taking on an icon of the Internet age. Robert Crumb, the counterculture illustrator known for characters such as Mr. Natural and Fritz the Cat, has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Amazon.com Inc., accusing the Internet retailer of using his images without permission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In 1980, R. Crumb produced a set of 36 trading cards called “Heroes of the Blues.” It's a great little set, backing Crumb's drawings with short biographical sketches of performers such as Blind Blake , Charlie Patton , Big Bill Broonzy and Peetie Wheatstraw . If there's any downside to the project, it's that it doesn't cover enough territory. Only 36 musicians? That barely scratches the surface of this most quintessential of American folk art forms. As it turns out, this is the motivation for William Stout's “Legends of the Blues,” coming May 7 from Abrams ComicArts, which picks up where Crumb left off. Featuring 100 musicians, the book has little overlap with “Heroes ...” -- save, as Stout says, “ Skip James and Blind Willie Johnson , two bluesmen I just couldn't bear to leave out” -- making the projects complementary in the most fundamental sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf
Growing up in Cleveland, a much-maligned city, Harvey Pekar was also mocked -- because of his weird-sounding name. Years later, in 1976, Pekar took matters into his own hands: He began writing -- not only about his moniker and the city he's called home for the last 63 years, but also about his working-stiff, bum-steer kind of life. These trials, tribulations and torments of Pekar's soul gave birth to the comic book "American Splendor." Illustrated by a smorgasbord of cartoonists, including Robert Crumb, the autobiographical tomes now number 28. While cranking out comics, the existential scribe supported himself doing 37 years of file clerk servitude at Cleveland's Veterans Affairs hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A habitual crank with a pronounced antisocial streak and an aversion to mainstream culture, the director Terry Zwigoff has one of the most distinctive sensibilities in American movies. This past decade, he has collaborated with the cartoonist Daniel Clowes on "Ghost World" (2001), a sardonic chronicle of teenage alienation in strip-mall America, and "Art School Confidential" (2006), a contemptuous attack on art-world strivers, and also directed Billy Bob Thornton in the cult favorite "Bad Santa" (2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Cartoons have been art's most common language going on 50 years, ever since Roy Lichtenstein painted Mickey Mouse and Edward Ruscha conjured Little Orphan Annie. Make that 140 years if you believe (as I do) that the brushy, broken, unfinished-surface look of Impressionist paintings was derived from the oil sketches that artists of the French Academy used to map out the slick, highly finished surfaces of their often grandiose canvases. They called those preparatory sketches cartoons, and the Impressionists latched onto their raw energy.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
An icon of the '60s is taking on an icon of the Internet age. Robert Crumb, the counterculture illustrator known for characters such as Mr. Natural and Fritz the Cat, has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Amazon.com Inc., accusing the Internet retailer of using his images without permission.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf
Growing up in Cleveland, a much-maligned city, Harvey Pekar was also mocked -- because of his weird-sounding name. Years later, in 1976, Pekar took matters into his own hands: He began writing -- not only about his moniker and the city he's called home for the last 63 years, but also about his working-stiff, bum-steer kind of life. These trials, tribulations and torments of Pekar's soul gave birth to the comic book "American Splendor." Illustrated by a smorgasbord of cartoonists, including Robert Crumb, the autobiographical tomes now number 28. While cranking out comics, the existential scribe supported himself doing 37 years of file clerk servitude at Cleveland's Veterans Affairs hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2001 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Originally advertised as "X-rated and animated," "Fritz the Cat" scored a hit when it was released in 1972, earning a then-impressive $25 million. (It cost only $850,000--a shoestring even at the time.) Gritty, violent and often gross, the film shocked U.S. audiences accustomed to innocent romances and painless slapstick in cartoons. It also made the reputation of director Ralph Bakshi, who adapted three of underground comix artist Robert Crumb's stories to the screen.
NEWS
April 20, 1996
Lynn O'Donnell, 43, producer of the 1995 award-winning documentary "Crumb." A native of Berkeley, O'Donnell studied filmmaking at San Francisco State. Her work included a documentary about Argentinecrooner, composer and actor Carlos Gardel titled "Voices of the Tango" and one about Nobel Prize-winning writer Czeslaw Milosz called "The Poet Remembers."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995
When the cartoon movie "Fritz the Cat" came out years ago, it looked like the "Felix the Cat" comic strip from the '30s, even with the psychedelic id. Now your "Creep Show" article (by Kristine McKenna, April 23) reveals the man behind this transformation, Robert Crumb. Reading the article, it occurred to me that Crumb's Natural Man is the spitting image of the Professor in the "Sappo" comic strip, again from the '30s. I started to wonder if Crumb does anything original. TOM FREEMAN Colton
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Cartoons have been art's most common language going on 50 years, ever since Roy Lichtenstein painted Mickey Mouse and Edward Ruscha conjured Little Orphan Annie. Make that 140 years if you believe (as I do) that the brushy, broken, unfinished-surface look of Impressionist paintings was derived from the oil sketches that artists of the French Academy used to map out the slick, highly finished surfaces of their often grandiose canvases. They called those preparatory sketches cartoons, and the Impressionists latched onto their raw energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"The instant I realized I was an outcast I became a critic, and I've been disgusted with American culture from the time I was a kid," says R. Crumb, the underground cartoonist who bequeathed the definitive acidhead mantra to the late '60s: "Keep on truckin'." "I started out by rejecting all the things that the people who rejected me liked, then over the years I developed a deeper analysis of these things." Many who have followed Robert Crumb's work since he launched the underground comics scene in the psychedelic '60s with the seminal publication "Zap Comix" agree that the 44-year-old artist is an uncommonly thoughtful observer of the passing parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
'People who want to be famous don't know what they're getting into," artist Robert Crumb told this reporter during a 1989 interview. "Once I got famous I saw a side of humanity I'd never seen before--people who don't even know your work want to glom onto you just because you're famous. It's a nauseating aspect of human nature that people worship power, and it's one of the things about mankind I find truly reprehensible."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"The instant I realized I was an outcast I became a critic, and I've been disgusted with American culture from the time I was a kid," says R. Crumb, the underground cartoonist who bequeathed the definitive acidhead mantra to the late '60s: "Keep on truckin'." "I started out by rejecting all the things that the people who rejected me liked, then over the years I developed a deeper analysis of these things." Many who have followed Robert Crumb's work since he launched the underground comics scene in the psychedelic '60s with the seminal publication "Zap Comix" agree that the 44-year-old artist is an uncommonly thoughtful observer of the passing parade.
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