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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
'Ten minutes," the Pasadena Playhouse stage manager yells out from the darkened auditorium--giving the cast of Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" a much-needed break. "Bless you . . . can we make it 20?" the lead, Robert Curtis Brown, says, dropping his Oxford accent and throwing a Dinah Shore kiss. The man, clearly, has been running a marathon--so much so that he woke up with acute laryngitis the day after this 10-hour rehearsal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998
"Present Laughter"--Robert Curtis Brown, above, portrays the vain Garry Essendine and Kaitlin Hopkins a predatory vamp in Noel Coward's comedy at the Pasadena Playhouse. * "The Cervantes Project"--Stages Theatre Center celebrates its 18th anniversary by staging the Cervantes Interludes: "The Sentinel of Love" and "The Theatre of Wonders" through Sunday. * "You Better Work!
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will somebody please pinch Robert Curtis-Brown? He can't seem to get a bad notice, whatever the role. * Last season at South Coast Repertory, a Times reviewer singled out his "dynamic performance" as a sharp congressional investigator in "Night and Her Stars." At the Matrix Theatre in West Hollywood two seasons ago, "his charm and comic timing make the evening," another Times reviewer wrote of his inarticulate Everyman in "One of Those Days."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Despite all appearances, Garry Essendine, the spoiled, aging matinee idol, is an estimable fellow. That may be hard to recognize beneath his pouty fits, his willed helplessness, his bossiness and his lovemaking to every woman who makes herself available, including the wife of a friend. "Present Laughter" is a coming-of-age story of a middle-aged man who should already have matured but hasn't--fame and charm got in his way.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998
"Present Laughter"--Robert Curtis Brown, above, portrays the vain Garry Essendine and Kaitlin Hopkins a predatory vamp in Noel Coward's comedy at the Pasadena Playhouse. * "The Cervantes Project"--Stages Theatre Center celebrates its 18th anniversary by staging the Cervantes Interludes: "The Sentinel of Love" and "The Theatre of Wonders" through Sunday. * "You Better Work!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Despite all appearances, Garry Essendine, the spoiled, aging matinee idol, is an estimable fellow. That may be hard to recognize beneath his pouty fits, his willed helplessness, his bossiness and his lovemaking to every woman who makes herself available, including the wife of a friend. "Present Laughter" is a coming-of-age story of a middle-aged man who should already have matured but hasn't--fame and charm got in his way.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Scene: Sunday night at the Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, at the Los Angeles premiere of "The Heidi Chronicles," a new production of the Center Theatre Group and the Ahmanson Theatre. (The play, which one critic called "a chronicle of frayed feminism," earned playwright Wendy Wasserstein a Tony Award, a Pulitzer Prize and seemingly every possible accolade except a World Series ring.) After the comedy-drama concluded, cast and guests went over to the Columbia Bar & Grill for an after party.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
"Terra Nova" is a cold play -- and not only because it's set in Antarctica. Ted Tally's examination of Robert Falcon Scott's doomed 1912 attempt to become the first explorer to reach the South Pole is better at pointing out Scott's tragic flaws than at establishing much sympathy for the man and his comrades. From the beginning of the text -- and of Martin Benson's staging at South Coast Repertory -- we know how Scott's enterprise will end.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Shame and the British. They go together like tea and crumpets, Sandhurst and Sid Vicious.  But South Coast Repertory's broad staging of Alan Ayckbourn's exercise in indignity, “Absurd Person Singular,” makes you yearn wistfully for more cheeky snaps of Prince Harry in Vegas. Ayckbourn's set-up is simple genius: Over three acts, we follow three couples at three Christmas parties in as many years, all seen from various kitchens. At the top, boorish entrepreneur Sidney (JD Cullum)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When underwater plankton become abundant on the lower depths of an iceberg, the iceberg can become so lopsided that, on rare occasion, it tips over, revealing the previously unseen greenery of the plankton. Or so we're told in "Green Icebergs" at South Coast Repertory. Just as the iceberg finally reveals its true colors, so do the people in Cecilia Fannon's captivating romantic comedy. But not all of her characters are equally "green."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
'Ten minutes," the Pasadena Playhouse stage manager yells out from the darkened auditorium--giving the cast of Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" a much-needed break. "Bless you . . . can we make it 20?" the lead, Robert Curtis Brown, says, dropping his Oxford accent and throwing a Dinah Shore kiss. The man, clearly, has been running a marathon--so much so that he woke up with acute laryngitis the day after this 10-hour rehearsal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will somebody please pinch Robert Curtis-Brown? He can't seem to get a bad notice, whatever the role. * Last season at South Coast Repertory, a Times reviewer singled out his "dynamic performance" as a sharp congressional investigator in "Night and Her Stars." At the Matrix Theatre in West Hollywood two seasons ago, "his charm and comic timing make the evening," another Times reviewer wrote of his inarticulate Everyman in "One of Those Days."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
If drama culminates in someone understanding something, then farce is its opposite. Oedipus realizes he has killed his father (and more); Lear finally understands Cordelia's worth. In farce, characters misunderstand the crucial facts so utterly that their skewered perceptions create a new reality--a comically altered universe. John believes he is delicately informing Jeff that his wife is having an affair with the mailman while the whole time Jeff thinks they are talking about his dog.
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