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Robert D Ballard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enthusiastic shouts from schoolchildren in another room learning about the ocean interrupted famed marine explorer Robert D. Ballard, discoverer of the sunken ships Titanic and Bismarck. But Ballard loved it. "How many classrooms encourage kids to scream?" Ballard said during an interview Friday at the Orange County Marine Institute at Dana Point Harbor.
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NEWS
September 13, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. archeologists have found the remains of a 7,500-year-old building, probably a house, more than 300 feet below the surface of the Black Sea, the strongest evidence yet of a catastrophic flood similar to the one portrayed in the biblical account of Noah's ark. Last November, explorer Robert Ballard, famed as the discoverer of the Titanic, reported evidence of a submerged shoreline several miles offshore from the current edge of the Black Sea and hundreds of feet below the surface.
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NEWS
July 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Robert D. Ballard headed up the discovery of two fabled sunken ships, the Titanic in 1985 and, just last month, the World War II German battleship Bismarck. In both cases, poignant reminders of human frailty persist on the dark, cold ocean floor, he says, lingering testaments to the dead, dragged far beyond air and light by plummeting hulks of steel and iron. Shoes. Pairs and pairs of shoes resting on the sea floor as if their owners had just stepped out of them.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Phoenician mariners sailed more than 2,500 years ago into the uncertain waters of the Mediterranean, praying to their storm god for a successful voyage--only to meet death in a fierce tempest. Now, American explorer Robert Ballard has located their two ships--the world's oldest known deep-water sea wrecks--using the same techniques he used to find the Titanic.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Phoenician mariners sailed more than 2,500 years ago into the uncertain waters of the Mediterranean, praying to their storm god for a successful voyage--only to meet death in a fierce tempest. Now, American explorer Robert Ballard has located their two ships--the world's oldest known deep-water sea wrecks--using the same techniques he used to find the Titanic.
NEWS
September 22, 1989
The explorer who found the wreck of the Titanic announced the discovery of a 19th-Century schooner, two vintage rail cars and, possibly, the site of Benedict Arnold's Revolutionary War gunboat in Lake Champlain. A team led by Robert Ballard of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod found the schooner Sarah Ellen apparently upright and virtually intact on the lake floor under about 300 feet of water, officials said.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Live, from the bottom of Lake Ontario, it's . . . Jason and the sunken 19th-Century schooners. It's not MTV or even a cartoon, but this "Jason" show has had tens of thousands of select schoolchildren glued to the tube for more than a week and their teachers don't seem to mind a bit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
So how does an undersea explorer top finding long lost ships like the Titanic and the Bismarck? How about using underwater robots to help solve the world's energy problems or discover the origins of life, while simultaneously turning 500,000 schoolchildren into research scientists. With the help of the Dana Point Marine Institute, Bob Ballard intends to do exactly that.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. archeologists have found the remains of a 7,500-year-old building, probably a house, more than 300 feet below the surface of the Black Sea, the strongest evidence yet of a catastrophic flood similar to the one portrayed in the biblical account of Noah's ark. Last November, explorer Robert Ballard, famed as the discoverer of the Titanic, reported evidence of a submerged shoreline several miles offshore from the current edge of the Black Sea and hundreds of feet below the surface.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Allene Symons
This is the book Titanic buffs have been waiting for. "Titanic: An Illustrated History" is likely to command the best berth in the library, even if one already has a shelf full of ill-fated-liner lore. The lavishly wide format is ideal for Marschall's dramatic paintings, which sweep across page-spreads so vividly you can almost hear the four-funneled ghost gliding through the waves.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
So you're Robert D. Ballard, a famed ocean explorer, and when you're only 43, you find the wreck of the Titanic, a prize that has eluded you and other undersea hunters for decades. What do you do for an encore? "I don't think you do," says Ballard, now 56. "You just move on." And "I don't think that's a bad thing," he adds. "I would hope my best discoveries are still ahead of me."
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Allene Symons
This is the book Titanic buffs have been waiting for. "Titanic: An Illustrated History" is likely to command the best berth in the library, even if one already has a shelf full of ill-fated-liner lore. The lavishly wide format is ideal for Marschall's dramatic paintings, which sweep across page-spreads so vividly you can almost hear the four-funneled ghost gliding through the waves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
So how does an undersea explorer top finding long lost ships like the Titanic and the Bismarck? How about using underwater robots to help solve the world's energy problems or discover the origins of life, while simultaneously turning 500,000 schoolchildren into research scientists. With the help of the Dana Point Marine Institute, Bob Ballard intends to do exactly that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enthusiastic shouts from schoolchildren in another room learning about the ocean interrupted famed marine explorer Robert D. Ballard, discoverer of the sunken ships Titanic and Bismarck. But Ballard loved it. "How many classrooms encourage kids to scream?" Ballard said during an interview Friday at the Orange County Marine Institute at Dana Point Harbor.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Live, from the bottom of Lake Ontario, it's . . . Jason and the sunken 19th-Century schooners. It's not MTV or even a cartoon, but this "Jason" show has had tens of thousands of select schoolchildren glued to the tube for more than a week and their teachers don't seem to mind a bit.
NEWS
September 22, 1989
The explorer who found the wreck of the Titanic announced the discovery of a 19th-Century schooner, two vintage rail cars and, possibly, the site of Benedict Arnold's Revolutionary War gunboat in Lake Champlain. A team led by Robert Ballard of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod found the schooner Sarah Ellen apparently upright and virtually intact on the lake floor under about 300 feet of water, officials said.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
So you're Robert D. Ballard, a famed ocean explorer, and when you're only 43, you find the wreck of the Titanic, a prize that has eluded you and other undersea hunters for decades. What do you do for an encore? "I don't think you do," says Ballard, now 56. "You just move on." And "I don't think that's a bad thing," he adds. "I would hope my best discoveries are still ahead of me."
NEWS
March 3, 1991
Robert D. Ballard, the marine geologist who located the Titanic and the German battleship Bismarck, will receive the annual $20,000 Harvey Mudd College Wright Prize for exceptional contributions to science through cross-disciplinary study. The prize will be presented March 4 on the Claremont campus.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Robert D. Ballard headed up the discovery of two fabled sunken ships, the Titanic in 1985 and, just last month, the World War II German battleship Bismarck. In both cases, poignant reminders of human frailty persist on the dark, cold ocean floor, he says, lingering testaments to the dead, dragged far beyond air and light by plummeting hulks of steel and iron. Shoes. Pairs and pairs of shoes resting on the sea floor as if their owners had just stepped out of them.
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