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Robert D Hormats

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BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glaring in its absence from last week's naming of President-elect Bill Clinton's economic policy team was a candidate for the critical job of U.S. trade representative. Clinton apparently is having trouble deciding not only whom he wants to fill the post, but what he wants to do about two key ongoing trade negotiations that are tantalizingly close to completion: the free trade agreement with Mexico and Canada and the 108-nation Uruguay Round of trade talks.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glaring in its absence from last week's naming of President-elect Bill Clinton's economic policy team was a candidate for the critical job of U.S. trade representative. Clinton apparently is having trouble deciding not only whom he wants to fill the post, but what he wants to do about two key ongoing trade negotiations that are tantalizingly close to completion: the free trade agreement with Mexico and Canada and the 108-nation Uruguay Round of trade talks.
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NEWS
October 2, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush called on the Federal Reserve Monday to push interest rates down in recognition of the new federal budget agreement, but officials at the central bank signaled that it is unlikely to do so in the foreseeable future.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours before the start of the 16th annual economic summit Monday, British spokesman Bernard Ingham was asked how the heads of the world's major industrial powers could possibly reach agreement on the intractable problem of cutting back farm subsidies. "Ah," Ingham replied, "therein lies the miracle of summits." Wednesday's final results seemed to prove him correct.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
Vice President Al Gore said Friday the administration will propose new funding to relieve the debt smothering the world's developing countries, and he called for the sale of some International Monetary Fund gold reserves to provide further debt relief.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
It's not that the annual economic summit meetings of the seven leading industrialized democracies never accomplish anything. Just three years ago, in Williamsburg, Va., President Reagan scored what one U.S. official called "an incredible coup" by extracting a commitment from reluctant allies to support the deployment of U.S. intermediate-range nuclear missiles on European soil. And in 1978 in Bonn, President Jimmy Carter made a deal with the allies in which he would decontrol U.S.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1995 | TERRENCE PETTY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the phone company showed up to install a line at the Leipzig home of American industrialist Raymond Heinz last month, he was astonished. * He had ordered it two years ago. Heinz had just gotten used to relying on the phone booth down the street. He couldn't trust his cellular phone because of bugs in the network.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Criticism escalated Sunday over the Clinton Administration's response to the declining dollar, feeding speculation that the Federal Reserve Board may decide next week to again raise short-term interest rates to bolster the U.S. currency against the Japanese yen and the German mark. White House officials urged a wait-and-see attitude after Friday's coordinated $3-billion intervention by the Treasury and 16 other major industrial nations to stop the rapid drop in the dollar's value.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
They may already be calling this the "do-nothing summit," but it's not as if it has much competition. In the 12 previous economic summits, beginning in Rambouillet, France, in 1975, few major accomplishments have ever emerged from the high-level meetings. From the start, the summits have been less important for any concrete results than for their symbolic value. "The purpose of the summits is not to make decisions," said Robert D.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and his top advisors have decided to take a page from the Vietnam War era in their handling of the current stock market turmoil and economic jitters: They declared victory and went home. In interviews Wednesday, senior administration officials made clear the White House thinks it has done all it can--and should--to calm the markets and buoy the economy.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
Joshua B. Bolten may be as much a loyalist as the rest of President Bush's inner circle, but he cuts a very distinct profile outside the West Wing: He rides a motorcycle, loves to bowl and keeps a copy of the children's book "Walter the Farting Dog" on his coffee table. That gives Bolten a rare dash of idiosyncrasy in a notoriously buttoned-down White House, where he will soon replace Andrew H. Card Jr. as chief of staff.
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