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Robert D Putnam

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NEWS
June 27, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Robert D. Putnam has a cure for what ails American society--three cures, actually: new rules to let working parents spend more time with their families; more extracurricular activities at school; and more groups, from Rotary Clubs to amateur brass bands, to get folks out from behind their computer screens. Putnam, a Harvard political scientist, believes he has identified a central crisis of our time--the decline of group activity.
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NEWS
June 27, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Robert D. Putnam has a cure for what ails American society--three cures, actually: new rules to let working parents spend more time with their families; more extracurricular activities at school; and more groups, from Rotary Clubs to amateur brass bands, to get folks out from behind their computer screens. Putnam, a Harvard political scientist, believes he has identified a central crisis of our time--the decline of group activity.
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NEWS
March 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Robert D. Putnam, a government professor at Harvard University, was named Monday as the next dean of the university's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Putnam, 48, will succeed Graham T. Allison Jr.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2000 | Charles Piller
The Internet and new wireless communications tools have created a burgeoning population of digital nomads for whom physical place is rapidly becoming irrelevant to daily life. One executive who travels 15,000 miles monthly pointed to a briefcase bulging with devices that support her constant stream of calls, e-mails and instant messages and said, "I work from that. The place doesn't matter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2003 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Forget about "bowling alone" -- a phrase that reflects political scientist Robert D. Putnam's observation that you can measure America's weakening sense of community by the decline in bowling leagues. In Costa Mesa, you can't bowl at all. The city's last bowling alley -- the landmark Kona Lanes, sporting a neon Tiki marquee outside and 40 wood-floor alleys inside -- quietly closed after 45 years of strikes, spares and splits.
OPINION
September 11, 2011
In the days and weeks after Sept. 11, 2001, the Times ran dozens of analysis and opinion pieces examining how the events of that day might change the United States and the world. We asked some of the writers who contributed their thoughts after the tragedy to look back at what they wrote then and reflect on it from the vantage point of today. Richard Rodriguez works at New America Media. His book on the influence of the desert on the Abrahmic religions will be published next year.
OPINION
October 17, 2010 | By Robert D. Putnam and David E. Campbell
The most rapidly growing religious category today is composed of those Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. While middle-aged and older Americans continue to embrace organized religion, rapidly increasing numbers of young people are rejecting it. As recently as 1990, all but 7% of Americans claimed a religious affiliation, a figure that had held constant for decades. Today, 17% of Americans say they have no religion, and these new "nones" are very heavily concentrated among Americans who have come of age since 1990.
OPINION
July 15, 2010 | Doyle McManus
The economic effects of the Great Recession have been easy to see: a stock market crash, a sickening drop in home values and household wealth, and the throbbing pain of persistent unemployment. But a deep recession does more than economic damage. When short-term unemployment turns into long-term unemployment, as it has in this recession to a level unseen since the 1930s, rates of depression (the psychiatric kind) increase, anxiety rises and behavior changes in ways both expected and unexpected.
OPINION
June 21, 2012 | Doyle McManus
If Mitt Romney wins the presidential election this fall, he'll have Harry Reid partly to thank. The Republican presidential nominee and the Senate Democratic leader don't have much in common politically. But they're both members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - that is, they're both Mormons. So whenever officials of the LDS church are asked about the once-common concern that a Mormon president might take orders from Salt Lake City, they have a ready answer: Just look at Harry Reid.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House hope was that President Clinton would stride to the podium for his State of the Union Address on Tuesday with a fresh victory on a budget deal, providing a big reason for voters to give him a second term.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | DOYLE MACMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
If I should need to name, O Western World, your powerfullest scene and show, 'Twould not be you, Niagara; nor you, ye limitless prairies; nor your huge rifts of canyons, Colorado; Nor you, Yosemite . . . I'd name--the still small voice vibrating--America's choosing day . . . Texas to Maine--the prairie states--Vermont, Virginia, California, The final ballot-shower from East to West.
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