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Robert D Shushan

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MAGAZINE
November 24, 1991
I have been trying for most of the past week to express in mere words both my deeply felt gratitude for your insightful and sensitively crafted story on James ("Remaking Mr. Jones," by Anne C. Roark, Oct. 6) and my admiration for Anne Roark's wonderful writing skill and the integrity she brought to her task. She was able to capture James--indeed, all of the "characters" in this saga--with both our human weaknesses and our hearts intact. For me, one of the best examples of her eloquence was her reference to James' wide grin as "revealing not only the gaping hole in his mouth but a hollow space in a soul hungry for attention."
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MAGAZINE
November 24, 1991
I have been trying for most of the past week to express in mere words both my deeply felt gratitude for your insightful and sensitively crafted story on James ("Remaking Mr. Jones," by Anne C. Roark, Oct. 6) and my admiration for Anne Roark's wonderful writing skill and the integrity she brought to her task. She was able to capture James--indeed, all of the "characters" in this saga--with both our human weaknesses and our hearts intact. For me, one of the best examples of her eloquence was her reference to James' wide grin as "revealing not only the gaping hole in his mouth but a hollow space in a soul hungry for attention."
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MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK, Anne C. Roark is a a Times staff writer who reports on science and medicine.
THE FIRST THINGS PEOPLE NOTICED WHEN THEY saw James Jones were his menacing walk, his thick, dirty beard, his long mane of black hair--and his teeth. The front teeth, on top and bottom, were missing altogether, and next to the gaping holes were canine teeth that protruded from his mouth, almost like fangs. When he was sitting on a bus reading the Bible or swaggering down a street muttering to himself, people either stared or turned away. A few of them called him names.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK, Anne C. Roark is a a Times staff writer who reports on science and medicine.
THE FIRST THINGS PEOPLE NOTICED WHEN THEY saw James Jones were his menacing walk, his thick, dirty beard, his long mane of black hair--and his teeth. The front teeth, on top and bottom, were missing altogether, and next to the gaping holes were canine teeth that protruded from his mouth, almost like fangs. When he was sitting on a bus reading the Bible or swaggering down a street muttering to himself, people either stared or turned away. A few of them called him names.
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1991
"Remaking Mr. Jones" by Anne C. Roark (Oct. 6) was one of your better articles. It's nice to know that there are still people like Robert D. Shushan helping those whom no one cares about. More power to him and to you for publishing the article. NANCY K. HUGHES Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1988 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Some pile beans, building dexterity. Others, more accomplished, package sponges to be sold for car washing. Some smile and stare; others avert their eyes. All are developmentally disabled. From learning to change clothes without leaving the dressing room with zippers unzipped to being taught what a stop sign means, about 120 mostly mentally retarded people are given the skills to be more independent at the Outside/Inside Community.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a Wednesday evening, and in Culver City the charity fund-raiser committee is meeting. There's the chairman--he's the one with the beard, ponytail and diamond stud earring. And there's the chairman of the tattoo contest--another bearded fellow, only this one's arms are covered with flame tattoos. Not your garden-variety party planners.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | KAREN LAVIOLA
When Antoinette Villereal, 21, entered the Outside/Inside Community a little more than six months ago, she was too shy to speak. Now, Villereal is a leader, helping those around her accomplish many tasks--like identifying coins, counting and singing in a talent show--that previously were hard but are now starting to come easy.
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