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NEWS
April 2, 1994
Robert Doisneau, 81, whose intimate, often poignant pictures of Parisians became some of the world's best-known photographs. Doisneau was noted for his pictures of Paris night life, of lovers and children, workers and circus performers. Even when posed, his black-and-white photos seemed to freeze a natural instant of anonymous real life. One of his most famous pictures, "The Kiss at City Hall," was the subject of a legal dispute last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Willy Ronis, 99, the last of France's postwar greats of photography who captured the essence of Paris in black-and-white scenes of everyday life, died Sept. 12 at a Paris hospital, said Stephane Ledoux, president of the Eyedea photo agency. Lovers, nudes and scenes from Paris streets, including "Bastille Lovers, Paris 1957," were the mainstay of Ronis' photographs, which reflect the so-called humanist school of photography. Ronis, along with friend Robert Doisneau and photojournalist Henri Cartier-Bresson, were among France's great photographers who emerged after World War II. Photographs of eastern Paris, where Ronis lived, were collected in a book of the Belleville and Menilmontant neighborhoods that reached cult status in France.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Willy Ronis, 99, the last of France's postwar greats of photography who captured the essence of Paris in black-and-white scenes of everyday life, died Sept. 12 at a Paris hospital, said Stephane Ledoux, president of the Eyedea photo agency. Lovers, nudes and scenes from Paris streets, including "Bastille Lovers, Paris 1957," were the mainstay of Ronis' photographs, which reflect the so-called humanist school of photography. Ronis, along with friend Robert Doisneau and photojournalist Henri Cartier-Bresson, were among France's great photographers who emerged after World War II. Photographs of eastern Paris, where Ronis lived, were collected in a book of the Belleville and Menilmontant neighborhoods that reached cult status in France.
NEWS
April 2, 1994
Robert Doisneau, 81, whose intimate, often poignant pictures of Parisians became some of the world's best-known photographs. Doisneau was noted for his pictures of Paris night life, of lovers and children, workers and circus performers. Even when posed, his black-and-white photos seemed to freeze a natural instant of anonymous real life. One of his most famous pictures, "The Kiss at City Hall," was the subject of a legal dispute last year.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who could imagine the bitterness, the anguish, the looming courtroom drama--all because of a romantic smooch nearly 43 years ago on the streets of Paris? In the spring of 1950, Parisian photographer Robert Doisneau took a picture of a young couple kissing as they walked along the sidewalk in front of the Paris city hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1999
* "A Tribute to Robert Doisneau"--Black and white images including "The Kiss at the Hotel de Ville," above, by the noted French photographer continue at Peter Fetterman Gallery through July 4. * "Portraits at Imperial Courts"--Dutch photographer Dana Lixenberg portrays residents of Watts' Imperial Courts Housing Projects beginning Saturday at the L.A. Center for Photographic Studies.
BOOKS
November 13, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
ON FLIRTATION: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Uncommitted Life by Adam Phillips (Harvard: $19.95; 226 pp.) This is not a joie de vivre book, not a bon vivant, c'est la guerre sort of book. Not a flirtatious treatment of flirtation. Do not be fooled by Robert Doisneau's photograph ("Les Amoureux aux Jonquilles") on the cover. Nor is it sheepish. Phillips does not sidle into the subject crab-wise and guilty. First things first: "To be committed to something . . .
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
The mystery of just who did the smooching in "Le Baiser de l'Hotel de Ville" (The Kiss at City Hall) has been solved by a French court. Was it the retired couple who claimed they were the young lovers whose kiss was immortalized in one of the world's best-known photographs 43 years ago? No. Was it Francoise Bornet, the model who was making a financial claim? Oui, but she's not entitled to a franc.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
How many bloodthirsty spectators could pack into Rome's Colosseum? Why did Shah Jahan build the Taj Mahal? Where could residents of Gamble House in Pasadena sleep on balmy evenings? British architect Neil Stevenson supplies the answers (which are [a] 50,000; [b] as a mausoleum for his wife, who died in childbirth, and [c] on outdoor "sleeping platforms") in "Annotated Guides: Architecture" (DK Publishing, Inc., 112 pages, $24.95).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1988 | KRISTINE McKENNA
One of the great things about dogs--or more specifically, dog walking--is the way they afford a person who's basically just nosing around or getting the lay of the land a visible excuse for loitering on a public street with nothing to do. This observation was brought home by "The Dog Show," an exhibition of photographs of dogs dating from 1865 through the present by 32 prominent photographers.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who could imagine the bitterness, the anguish, the looming courtroom drama--all because of a romantic smooch nearly 43 years ago on the streets of Paris? In the spring of 1950, Parisian photographer Robert Doisneau took a picture of a young couple kissing as they walked along the sidewalk in front of the Paris city hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1995 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
In the midst of planning the catering for this year's Emmys (where he got into a big on-camera food fight with host Cybill Shepherd--scripted, of course), Joachim Splichal was also putting the finishing touches on his latest Patina spinoff, Pinot Hollywood, which follows Pinot Bistro in the San Fernando Valley and Cafe Pinot downtown. This Pinot is dubbed a Parisian-style brasserie. And it feels like one, with its Art Nouveau decor, vaulted skylight and cozy banquettes.
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