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Robert Dowd

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January 18, 2009 | Scarlet Cheng
Money makes the world go 'round, and we now realize that when the force isn't with us, things can come to a screeching halt. Artist Robert Dowd was well aware of the power and glory of money, and during the 1960s he was "making" it after his own fashion -- creating drawings and paintings that satirically reinterpreted the face of American currency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Scarlet Cheng
Money makes the world go 'round, and we now realize that when the force isn't with us, things can come to a screeching halt. Artist Robert Dowd was well aware of the power and glory of money, and during the 1960s he was "making" it after his own fashion -- creating drawings and paintings that satirically reinterpreted the face of American currency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
Back in the early '60s, Robert Dowd's large-scale Pop renditions of dollar bills and postage stamps led to his arrest by the FBI for counterfeiting. Times, if not art styles, have changed significantly since then, and this retrospective of Dowd's paintings from 1962-67 is perhaps less interesting for its insights into Pop as a '60s phenomenon than for underlining its new role as historical artifact and valuable museum piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Painter Robert Dowd has a reputation as a Pop artist. Indeed his most recent paintings of wine bottles and apples buzz with chic painterly marks that do have an updated Pop sensibility--reflecting the trendy commercialism of the current art market. But that doesn't stop them from looking like magazine illustrations for classy wine. With titles like "Object Event" and "Quantum Event" Dowd is trying to capture something of modern physics' concept that all matter is composed of swirling subatomic particles.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former youth pastor David Rickard returned to court this week and, for the third time, faced his accuser--a young man, now 20, who described sexual acts he claims occurred five years ago in Sierra Madre. "I don't care if he goes to prison or anything," the youth told jurors. "I just want to see him admit that this happened, instead of just lying about it and going on with his life."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Butterfield & Butterfield, a West Coast auction house best known for sales of low-priced regional and decorative arts, has launched a new program of 20th-Century art sales. In its first auction devoted exclusively to the art of this century, on Thursday night, the firm rang up $727,100 in sales. The auction, staged simultaneously in Los Angeles and San Francisco, fell far short of expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
Though the King of Pop Art lived and reigned in New York, Andy Warhol's pop art colleagues in Los Angeles helped the form to flourish too. Their work had qualities unique to California, however, a notion explored in an exhibit opening Thursday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. "L.A. Pop in the Sixties," through July 9, features paintings and multimedia work by Ed Ruscha, Vija Celmins, Joe Goode, Billy Al Bengston, Wallace Berman, Phillip Hefferton, John Baldessari, Robert Dowd and Llyn Foulkes, all originally associated with '60s pop art. "This was a group of very important artists who developed slightly differently from the pop artists in New York," said Marilu Knode, a museum curatorial assistant, "and very differently from Warhol, the quintessential pop artist."
BUSINESS
January 30, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California farmers have suffered to the tune of $245 million--so far--during this month's floods. That latest estimate by the California Department of Food and Agriculture updates an initial figure of $155 million, released Jan. 10. It was based on reports compiled by county agricultural commissioners. "With the rains continuing in various areas of the state, it is still difficult to assess the damages," Ann M.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Ever since television came to rule communications, concerned watchers have claimed that its pungent pictures are sabotaging the power of spoken and written language. You know the kind of thing. A tough TV reporter asks the President when he is going to stop sending arms to some Third World tyrant. The President pretends he can't hear over the roar of Helicopter One, smiles and swoops away amid fluttering flags and smiling children.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Talking with seven of the nine artists included in "L.A. Pop of the '60s," one gets an eye-opening lesson in the less-than-perfect ways in which art history comes to be written. On view at the Newport Harbor Art Museum through July 9, the show was curated by Anne Ayres, includes work by Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Vija Celmins, Robert Dowd, Llyn Foulkes, Joe Goode, John Baldessari, Wallace Berman and Phillip Hefferton and is described in a press release as attempting to "reveal a distinct and significant vision which differs from the British/New York variants of Pop, a vision which grew out of the L.A. 'pop' life style and was colored by California artistic concerns."
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