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Robert Durst

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NATIONAL
November 12, 2003 | Lianne Hart and Scott Gold, Times Staff Writers
A jury on Tuesday found New York real estate heir Robert Durst not guilty of murder, despite his admission that he dismembered his neighbor's corpse and threw the remains into the sea. The decision by the eight-woman, four-man jury came after five days of deliberation, sending gasps through the courtroom in this beach town south of Houston where Durst had moved three years ago -- disguising himself as a mute woman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Andrew Jarecki has identity issues: Wherever the entrepreneur-turned-filmmaker points his cameras, he unearths people acting as if they were someone else. In his Oscar-nominated debut, 2003's "Capturing the Friedmans," Jarecki examined a well-liked teacher leading a terrifying double life. He produced this year's "Catfish," a look at how people can concoct multiple Internet versions of their true selves. And now Jarecki has directed "All Good Things," a glimpse into a woman's unsolved disappearance ?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in Pennsylvania's Northampton County said Monday they expect a lengthy extradition process to precede any trial for Robert Durst, the wealthy fugitive wanted on Texas murder charges who was captured in a grocery store. Durst, 58, the son of a New York real estate magnate, has drawn the interest of detectives in two other investigations, including a murder case in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2006 | From Associated Press
A New York real estate heir who was acquitted of murdering a neighbor in 2003 but sent to prison last month for parole violations was released early after he sued the state alleging the punishment was too harsh, his attorney said Wednesday. Robert Durst was sent to the facility for 60 days on Feb. 3 for taking trips in violation of his parole. He got out late Tuesday after 26 days.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge set bond at $2 billion on bond-jumping charges against New York real estate heir Robert Durst, who was found not guilty last month in the killing of a neighbor. Although Durst was acquitted of killing Morris Black, 71, he has remained jailed on bond-jumping charges because he fled Galveston shortly after his arrest in 2001. The judge said she was concerned about Durst's ability to flee because he has financial means and a history of running.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
New York real estate heir Robert Durst -- jailed for nearly three years on charges related to the death and dismemberment of an elderly neighbor -- is eligible for parole and probably will be freed this week, state officials said in Houston. Durst was acquitted in November of intentionally killing 71-year-old Morris Black in Galveston, but remained jailed for bond jumping because he fled after his 2001 arrest; and for evidence-tampering, for disposing of the victim's body parts.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An appeals court in Houston lowered the bail for New York real estate heir Robert Durst from $3 billion to $450,000, increasing the likelihood that the cross-dressing millionaire and former fugitive would be released. Durst, 61, was found not guilty in November of intentionally killing his neighbor, 71-year-old Morris Black, in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York state police, after recently reopening a 19-year-old investigation into the disappearance of the wife of a prominent East Coast developer, were attempting to arrange an interview with author Susan Berman just before she was found shot to death in her Benedict Canyon home late last month. "We were interested in talking to her and we wanted to make it happen," said Westchester County Dist. Atty. Jeanine Pirro on Monday. "We were extremely disappointed when we heard what had happened."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Andrew Jarecki has identity issues: Wherever the entrepreneur-turned-filmmaker points his cameras, he unearths people acting as if they were someone else. In his Oscar-nominated debut, 2003's "Capturing the Friedmans," Jarecki examined a well-liked teacher leading a terrifying double life. He produced this year's "Catfish," a look at how people can concoct multiple Internet versions of their true selves. And now Jarecki has directed "All Good Things," a glimpse into a woman's unsolved disappearance ?
OPINION
November 18, 2003
Re "Cries for Help a Texas Jury Did Not Answer," Commentary, Nov. 14: Nancy Grace's complaint that the Robert Durst acquittal was "a kick in the stomach for those of us who love justice" is written from the perspective of a prosecutor, which she was. I wasn't in the courtroom and can't comment on the merits of the evidence presented, but I respect a jury's verdict more than I respect the point of view of a prosecutor who moans that her belief in our...
NATIONAL
October 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
New York real estate heir Robert Durst -- jailed for nearly three years on charges related to the death and dismemberment of an elderly neighbor -- is eligible for parole and probably will be freed this week, state officials said in Houston. Durst was acquitted in November of intentionally killing 71-year-old Morris Black in Galveston, but remained jailed for bond jumping because he fled after his 2001 arrest; and for evidence-tampering, for disposing of the victim's body parts.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An appeals court in Houston lowered the bail for New York real estate heir Robert Durst from $3 billion to $450,000, increasing the likelihood that the cross-dressing millionaire and former fugitive would be released. Durst, 61, was found not guilty in November of intentionally killing his neighbor, 71-year-old Morris Black, in 2001.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge set bond at $2 billion on bond-jumping charges against New York real estate heir Robert Durst, who was found not guilty last month in the killing of a neighbor. Although Durst was acquitted of killing Morris Black, 71, he has remained jailed on bond-jumping charges because he fled Galveston shortly after his arrest in 2001. The judge said she was concerned about Durst's ability to flee because he has financial means and a history of running.
OPINION
November 18, 2003
Re "Cries for Help a Texas Jury Did Not Answer," Commentary, Nov. 14: Nancy Grace's complaint that the Robert Durst acquittal was "a kick in the stomach for those of us who love justice" is written from the perspective of a prosecutor, which she was. I wasn't in the courtroom and can't comment on the merits of the evidence presented, but I respect a jury's verdict more than I respect the point of view of a prosecutor who moans that her belief in our...
OPINION
November 14, 2003 | Nancy Grace, Nancy Grace, an anchor for Court TV, is a former Atlanta prosecutor.
A 13-year-old boy went fishing off Galveston Bay at dusk. As the waters rushed by, he spotted a figure in the muddy ripples. After squinting and staring, he made out the figure of a dead man floating in the dark waters. His eyes must have blinked wide open, his heart must have skipped a beat, a chill must have run up his little-boy spine when he made out a human torso before he took off running for help.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2003 | Lianne Hart and Scott Gold, Times Staff Writers
A jury on Tuesday found New York real estate heir Robert Durst not guilty of murder, despite his admission that he dismembered his neighbor's corpse and threw the remains into the sea. The decision by the eight-woman, four-man jury came after five days of deliberation, sending gasps through the courtroom in this beach town south of Houston where Durst had moved three years ago -- disguising himself as a mute woman.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
After six weeks of often grisly testimony, jurors on Wednesday began deliberating the central questions in the murder trial of New York real estate heir Robert Durst: Did Durst intentionally kill his neighbor, Morris Black, then dismember him to get rid of the evidence? Or did Black die in an accidental shooting? Prosecutors told jurors in closing statements that Durst, 60, is a man without a conscience whose actions before and after the killing point to his guilt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 9-millimeter gun found in the car of a wealthy developer charged with murdering his neighbor in Texas has drawn "intense interest" from Los Angeles police investigating the killing of a Benedict Canyon writer, said authorities in Galveston, Texas. Police found the handgun when Robert Durst was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of killing and beheading 71-year-old Morris Black, police said. They also found a .
NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
After six weeks of often grisly testimony, jurors on Wednesday began deliberating the central questions in the murder trial of New York real estate heir Robert Durst: Did Durst intentionally kill his neighbor, Morris Black, then dismember him to get rid of the evidence? Or did Black die in an accidental shooting? Prosecutors told jurors in closing statements that Durst, 60, is a man without a conscience whose actions before and after the killing point to his guilt.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2003 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
New York real estate heir Robert Durst, on trial in the shooting and beheading of a neighbor, told prosecutors Monday that a bottle of whiskey had obliterated his memory of dismembering the victim. "You were drunk when you were cutting him up?" asked Galveston County District Atty. Kurt Sistrunk, referring to the fifth of Jack Daniels that Durst said he downed before dismembering 71-year-old Morris Black. "I hope so, yes sir," Durst replied.
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