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Robert E Allen

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NEWS
August 21, 1985 | United Press International
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. today announced it is eliminating about 24,000 jobs in its Information Systems group, about 20% of the work force in its computer and business equipment arm. Robert E. Allen, chairman of Information Systems, based in Morristown, N.J., informed employee groups of the layoffs in a nationwide telephone call. About 30% of the staff reductions involve management jobs. Allen said the layoffs were being made to reduce costs and improve profit margins.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1993
A friend has just given me a copy of an article that appeared in the Business section of The Times--"AT&T Appears Eager to Call Up a New Image" (April 19)--that carried the subheading, "New ad campaign will seek to reach the MTV generation, with Cliff Robertson nowhere to be seen." As Mr. Robertson's personal assistant here in California for the past 35 years, I found it shocking and unprofessional that such an article could be written without all the facts being known. There are, I believe, many reasons why AT&T chose Mr. Robertson to be their spokesperson.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Telephone & Telegraph said late Wednesday that it will begin today a hostile $90-per-share cash tender offer for NCR Corp. after the computer company rejected AT&T's earlier $6.1-billion bid and demanded a price of nearly $8.4 billion. The moves, coupled with NCR's subsequent tightening of its anti-takeover defenses, set the stage for what analysts said could be a protracted, messy and expensive fight for control of the nation's fifth-largest computer company.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If American Telephone & Telegraph Chairman Robert E. Allen were prone to folding under pressure, you might have seen it at AT&T's annual Pro-Am golf tournament at Pebble Beach earlier this year. But with network TV cameras rolling, Allen, an 8-handicap golfer, sunk a 15-foot birdie putt without a miscue. Another high-profile, high-stakes performance by Allen is coming.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1993
A friend has just given me a copy of an article that appeared in the Business section of The Times--"AT&T Appears Eager to Call Up a New Image" (April 19)--that carried the subheading, "New ad campaign will seek to reach the MTV generation, with Cliff Robertson nowhere to be seen." As Mr. Robertson's personal assistant here in California for the past 35 years, I found it shocking and unprofessional that such an article could be written without all the facts being known. There are, I believe, many reasons why AT&T chose Mr. Robertson to be their spokesperson.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Robert E. Allen, AT&T's acting chairman and the likely permanent successor to the late James E. Olson, isn't much like the previous head of the nation's eighth-largest company. "In style, they're different as night and day," said Robert B. Morris III, who follows the company for Prudential-Bache Securities. "Mr. Olson was gregarious, forceful and a take-charge individual. Mr. Allen is much more of a methodical, reserved individual."
BUSINESS
May 30, 1987 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Massive layoffs and cutbacks are a thing of the past for AT&T, company President Robert E. Allen said Friday. "We don't need to concern ourselves with early retirements, layoffs or other work force reductions," Allen said in an interview while in Los Angeles to address the World Affairs Council.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American Telephone & Telegraph, in a move to decentralize its decision making, is organizing the company into 15 "businesses units" that each will be headed by a president who will be held responsible for the operation's profits and losses. AT&T Chairman Robert E. Allen on Wednesday called the reorganization an attempt to respond to increased competition and the demands of customers for ever more specialized products and services.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Moving quickly to ensure management continuity, American Telephone & Telegraph announced Wednesday that company President Robert E. Allen was named, as expected, to succeed the late James E. Olson as chairman and chief executive. At its emotion-charged annual meeting in Denver, AT&T also reported that its first-quarter earnings were up a healthy 10.6% to $492 million. Revenue was up 2.8% to $8.35 billion, reflecting somewhat improved sales.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. reported Thursday the first annual loss in its 103 years and one of the biggest quarterly losses in U.S. corporate history, the result of last month's decision to speed up the modernization of its long-distance system. The losses, which were projected by AT&T on Dec. 1, stemmed from a one-time charge of $6.7 billion to write off outdated switching equipment and to convert its network to all-digital operation.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | GARY LEE and SHARON LaFRANIERE, THE WASHINGTON POST
A coalition of leading U.S. corporations, under criticism from White House officials, is pulling out of negotiations with civil rights leaders on a Democratic-sponsored civil rights bill dealing with job discrimination, American Telephone & Telegraph Chairman Robert Allen announced Friday.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Telephone & Telegraph said late Wednesday that it will begin today a hostile $90-per-share cash tender offer for NCR Corp. after the computer company rejected AT&T's earlier $6.1-billion bid and demanded a price of nearly $8.4 billion. The moves, coupled with NCR's subsequent tightening of its anti-takeover defenses, set the stage for what analysts said could be a protracted, messy and expensive fight for control of the nation's fifth-largest computer company.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American Telephone & Telegraph, in a move to decentralize its decision making, is organizing the company into 15 "businesses units" that each will be headed by a president who will be held responsible for the operation's profits and losses. AT&T Chairman Robert E. Allen on Wednesday called the reorganization an attempt to respond to increased competition and the demands of customers for ever more specialized products and services.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. reported Thursday the first annual loss in its 103 years and one of the biggest quarterly losses in U.S. corporate history, the result of last month's decision to speed up the modernization of its long-distance system. The losses, which were projected by AT&T on Dec. 1, stemmed from a one-time charge of $6.7 billion to write off outdated switching equipment and to convert its network to all-digital operation.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If American Telephone & Telegraph Chairman Robert E. Allen were prone to folding under pressure, you might have seen it at AT&T's annual Pro-Am golf tournament at Pebble Beach earlier this year. But with network TV cameras rolling, Allen, an 8-handicap golfer, sunk a 15-foot birdie putt without a miscue. Another high-profile, high-stakes performance by Allen is coming.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Moving quickly to ensure management continuity, American Telephone & Telegraph announced Wednesday that company President Robert E. Allen was named, as expected, to succeed the late James E. Olson as chairman and chief executive. At its emotion-charged annual meeting in Denver, AT&T also reported that its first-quarter earnings were up a healthy 10.6% to $492 million. Revenue was up 2.8% to $8.35 billion, reflecting somewhat improved sales.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Robert E. Allen, AT&T's acting chairman and the likely permanent successor to the late James E. Olson, isn't much like the previous head of the nation's eighth-largest company. "In style, they're different as night and day," said Robert B. Morris III, who follows the company for Prudential-Bache Securities. "Mr. Olson was gregarious, forceful and a take-charge individual. Mr. Allen is much more of a methodical, reserved individual."
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