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Robert E Holmes

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NEWS
February 15, 2007 | Cindy Chang, Special to The Times
WHEN Robert E. Holmes showed works from his collection of African American, Latino and gay art at East Los Angeles College in 2002, a review in the Los Angeles Times pointed out a curious omission. Though the explanatory texts and an accompanying monograph discussed racial themes, nowhere did the written materials address the obvious homoerotic currents in some of the art.
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NEWS
February 15, 2007 | Cindy Chang, Special to The Times
WHEN Robert E. Holmes showed works from his collection of African American, Latino and gay art at East Los Angeles College in 2002, a review in the Los Angeles Times pointed out a curious omission. Though the explanatory texts and an accompanying monograph discussed racial themes, nowhere did the written materials address the obvious homoerotic currents in some of the art.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Obsession is always beguiling. Located beyond the clipped and rationally tended territory of reason, it dovetails nicely with art. Put the two together, and art obsession serves pretty well as a working definition of just what grips collectors. At East Los Angeles College's Vincent Price Gallery, a show of 125 works from the collection of Robert E. Holmes is a modest yet appealing example of the affliction. The exhibition is nicely overstuffed.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite record spending for movie scripts and recording contracts and the global boom in entertainment vehicles such as videocassettes, compact discs and syndicated television, getting a job in Hollywood is harder than ever. It isn't a matter of fewer jobs. It's tougher competition. "While film and TV production is near an all-time high, we also have a talent pool that is at an all-time high," said Mark Locher, national communications director at the Screen Actors Guild.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Dragna is back in prison. For the 10th time. This is what prison has taught him: "Nothing. It's just getting easier. It doesn't bother me." Convicts such as Dragna, a 29-year-old drug abuser and chronic parole violator, are a major reason that California's prison construction program--the largest in history--remains woefully inadequate.
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