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NEWS
January 18, 2000 | Associated Press
A portrait of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee hanging at an outdoor gallery devoted to the city's history was vandalized Monday, police said. Joel Lawson, a police arson investigator, declined to describe the nature or the extent of the damage to the portrait. The case is under investigation. The City Council voted last summer to display the portrait following a debate over whether Lee's role in defending slavery in the South made his image offensive to blacks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From horseback, he gazes out across parks and boulevards all over the American South. He lends his name to high schools, colleges and the iconic Dodge Charger in "The Dukes of Hazzard. " To some followers he's "the marble man," born to be made into statuary. So it's tempting for people today who don't see Gen. Robert E. Lee as unambiguously heroic to try to push him right out of his saddle. But a debunking approach didn't seem right to Mark Zwonitzer, whose new American Experience documentary on the Civil War figure broadcasts on PBS on Monday.
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NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Linda Wheeler, Washington Post
More than 80 years after the death of Mary Custis Lee, eldest and most headstrong daughter of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, two steamer trunks full of her papers and travel souvenirs have been found in a bank vault in suburban Alexandria, Va. The wooden trunks -- containing family letters, photographs, clippings of her father's obituary, strands of hair collected from royalty on European trips rarely taken by other single women of her era -- came to light after an inquiry from a descendant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert E. A. Lee, 87, the former executive secretary of Lutheran Film Associates, died Feb. 27 of cancer at his home in Long Island, N.Y., according to an announcement from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Lee was perhaps best known for his role as executive producer of "A Time for Burning," a civil rights film that was ultimately nominated for an Academy Award in the documentary category. Fred Friendly, the former president of CBS News, called it the "best civil rights film ever made."
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Lee, half of the distinguished writing team that brought the incorrigible "Auntie Mame" and the politically significant "Inherit the Wind" to theatergoers around the world, has died. His daughter, Lucy Lee, announced over the weekend that her father had died of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Friday. He was 75.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From horseback, he gazes out across parks and boulevards all over the American South. He lends his name to high schools, colleges and the iconic Dodge Charger in "The Dukes of Hazzard. " To some followers he's "the marble man," born to be made into statuary. So it's tempting for people today who don't see Gen. Robert E. Lee as unambiguously heroic to try to push him right out of his saddle. But a debunking approach didn't seem right to Mark Zwonitzer, whose new American Experience documentary on the Civil War figure broadcasts on PBS on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert E. A. Lee, 87, the former executive secretary of Lutheran Film Associates, died Feb. 27 of cancer at his home in Long Island, N.Y., according to an announcement from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Lee was perhaps best known for his role as executive producer of "A Time for Burning," a civil rights film that was ultimately nominated for an Academy Award in the documentary category. Fred Friendly, the former president of CBS News, called it the "best civil rights film ever made."
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | MATTHEW MOSK, WASHINGTON POST
At the wheel of his German luxury sedan, William F. Chaney cuts off the main road through Sharpsburg, Md., and makes his assault up a grassy hill near the spot where the Battle of Antietam began. Over to the left, he says, extending his arm out the window, is the sunken road that had earned the name Bloody Lane when the fighting stopped.
BOOKS
August 13, 1995 | Robert V. Remini, Robert V. Remini's most recent books include "Henry Clay: Stateman for the Union" and "The Life of Andrew Jackson."
Americans are a strange breed. They go to war and frequently compensate their defeated enemies with indemnities or financial aid, sometimes to their regret later on. And they revere the most unlikely people: film stars who can't act; singers with no voice and who know little about music; writers who have nothing to say. Worse, their heroes can include misfits, Wild West personalities, outlaws, even rebels. Take Gen. Robert E. Lee, for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The state commission asked to determine what California's public school students should learn at various grade levels has unveiled drafts of its standards in two more subject areas: science and history-social science. The proposed science standards emphasize fundamental knowledge as well as the use of the scientific method. And they treat high school chemistry and physical science as separate disciplines--rather than integrating the two, as is becoming increasingly common in many schools.
TRAVEL
March 16, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
This pretty little college town in the Shenandoah Valley usually gets no more than a brief mention in history books, belying its status as a major Confederate shrine. No great battles were won or lost here, yet the Civil War movie "Gods and Generals," which opened last month, begins and ends in Lexington. Fate has bequeathed the town a notable heritage, fueled in part by two of its institutions: Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Linda Wheeler, Washington Post
More than 80 years after the death of Mary Custis Lee, eldest and most headstrong daughter of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, two steamer trunks full of her papers and travel souvenirs have been found in a bank vault in suburban Alexandria, Va. The wooden trunks -- containing family letters, photographs, clippings of her father's obituary, strands of hair collected from royalty on European trips rarely taken by other single women of her era -- came to light after an inquiry from a descendant.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | Associated Press
A portrait of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee hanging at an outdoor gallery devoted to the city's history was vandalized Monday, police said. Joel Lawson, a police arson investigator, declined to describe the nature or the extent of the damage to the portrait. The case is under investigation. The City Council voted last summer to display the portrait following a debate over whether Lee's role in defending slavery in the South made his image offensive to blacks.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | MATTHEW MOSK, WASHINGTON POST
At the wheel of his German luxury sedan, William F. Chaney cuts off the main road through Sharpsburg, Md., and makes his assault up a grassy hill near the spot where the Battle of Antietam began. Over to the left, he says, extending his arm out the window, is the sunken road that had earned the name Bloody Lane when the fighting stopped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The state commission asked to determine what California's public school students should learn at various grade levels has unveiled drafts of its standards in two more subject areas: science and history-social science. The proposed science standards emphasize fundamental knowledge as well as the use of the scientific method. And they treat high school chemistry and physical science as separate disciplines--rather than integrating the two, as is becoming increasingly common in many schools.
BOOKS
August 13, 1995 | Robert V. Remini, Robert V. Remini's most recent books include "Henry Clay: Stateman for the Union" and "The Life of Andrew Jackson."
Americans are a strange breed. They go to war and frequently compensate their defeated enemies with indemnities or financial aid, sometimes to their regret later on. And they revere the most unlikely people: film stars who can't act; singers with no voice and who know little about music; writers who have nothing to say. Worse, their heroes can include misfits, Wild West personalities, outlaws, even rebels. Take Gen. Robert E. Lee, for example.
TRAVEL
March 16, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
This pretty little college town in the Shenandoah Valley usually gets no more than a brief mention in history books, belying its status as a major Confederate shrine. No great battles were won or lost here, yet the Civil War movie "Gods and Generals," which opened last month, begins and ends in Lexington. Fate has bequeathed the town a notable heritage, fueled in part by two of its institutions: Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
E. Hamilton Lee, who was flying planes just 13 years after the Wright Brothers took flight at Kitty Hawk, celebrated his 100th birthday Saturday by flying as co-pilot on a DC-3 from Ontario to Van Nuys Airport. "Good, good, good," but "a little rough," said Lee, known in aviation circles as the dean of airline pilots, as he emerged from the plane, his trademark cigar dangling from his mouth. Lee, the first civilian pilot to fly the U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Lee, half of the distinguished writing team that brought the incorrigible "Auntie Mame" and the politically significant "Inherit the Wind" to theatergoers around the world, has died. His daughter, Lucy Lee, announced over the weekend that her father had died of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Friday. He was 75.
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