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Robert E Peary

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NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
A yearlong scientific analysis of the photographs and notes brought back by Robert E. Peary establishes that the explorer reached the North Pole on April 6, 1909, just as he claimed, the National Geographic Society said today. The study was undertaken by the Navigators Foundation, a nonprofit organization that had asserted last February that there was room for scholarly doubt that the Navy admiral reached his destination.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1917, Merchant Marine Capt. Thomas Hall tried to debunk Admiral Robert E. Peary as the first explorer to reach the North Pole, insisting that the shadows on Peary's published photos did not look as if they could have been taken on top of the world. "Shadows are nature's witnesses," Hall wrote. "They never lie." Now, the shadows have come to the fore once again, but this time to the benefit of Adm. Peary.
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NEWS
December 12, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American hero Robert E. Peary was not a fraud but reached the North Pole on April 6, 1909, just as he claimed he did, the Navigation Foundation reported Monday after a yearlong study designed to quell the long-simmering controversy. "We sincerely hope," said the small but well-respected foundation, "that this report will help to set the record straight and perhaps put an end to the long process of vilification of a courageous American explorer."
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American hero Robert E. Peary was not a fraud but reached the North Pole on April 6, 1909, just as he claimed he did, the Navigation Foundation reported Monday after a yearlong study designed to quell the long-simmering controversy. "We sincerely hope," said the small but well-respected foundation, "that this report will help to set the record straight and perhaps put an end to the long process of vilification of a courageous American explorer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1917, Merchant Marine Capt. Thomas Hall tried to debunk Admiral Robert E. Peary as the first explorer to reach the North Pole, insisting that the shadows on Peary's published photos did not look as if they could have been taken on top of the world. "Shadows are nature's witnesses," Hall wrote. "They never lie." Now, the shadows have come to the fore once again, but this time to the benefit of Adm. Peary.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Polar explorer Robert E. Peary, whose legacy has been suspended in limbo the past few months as scholars debated whether he should be ranked as one of the nation's leading heroes or one of its greatest frauds, got a little help Wednesday. The nonprofit Navigation Foundation said a mysterious document that surfaced last October does not prove Peary lied when he claimed to have "discovered" the North Pole in 1909.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | Stephen J. Pyne, Pyne is the author of several books, including "The Ice" and most recently "Fire on the Rim: A Firefighter's Season at the Grand Canyon" (Weidenfeld & Nicolson). and
In September, 1909, within a space of nine days, two explorers publicly claimed they had reached the North Pole. Dr. Frederick A. Cook announced first, asserting that he had made the pole on April 21, 1908. Commodore Robert E. Peary, returning from Greenland, then proclaimed that his own long-awaited conquest of the pole had succeeded on April 6, 1909--and promptly denounced Cook's claim as bogus. Cook received medals, wild public adulation, a tour of Europe. Peary met with scorn.
WORLD
April 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Five explorers using huskies and wooden sleds reached the North Pole, setting a world record by arriving 4 hours and 49 minutes faster than a 37-day trek by American explorer Adm. Robert E. Peary on the same journey in 1909, the expedition team said. British explorer Tom Avery wanted to prove that it was possible to make the 475-mile trip from Cape Columbia in Canada's Nunavut province in the time claimed by Peary.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | Associated Press
The black co-discoverer of the North Pole received what one supporter called "long overdue recognition" as his remains were reinterred with full military honors Wednesday at Arlington National Cemetery alongside those of Adm. Robert E. Peary. Matthew Alexander Henson planted the American flag at the North Pole exactly 79 years ago during an expedition with Peary and four Eskimos. Peary was buried at Arlington in 1920 and a monument to him was erected by his grave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1986
Of all the Earth's inhospitable places, the North Pole surely is among the worst. Still, it remains an irresistible attraction for adventurers 75 years after Robert E. Peary first reached this strange ill-defined spot where at ice-level the only way to know you are there is that every direction is south. A number of expeditions have reached the pole since Peary's team in 1909, assisted only by dog sled. People have flown over it in airplanes and dirigibles.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
A yearlong scientific analysis of the photographs and notes brought back by Robert E. Peary establishes that the explorer reached the North Pole on April 6, 1909, just as he claimed, the National Geographic Society said today. The study was undertaken by the Navigators Foundation, a nonprofit organization that had asserted last February that there was room for scholarly doubt that the Navy admiral reached his destination.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | Stephen J. Pyne, Pyne is the author of several books, including "The Ice" and most recently "Fire on the Rim: A Firefighter's Season at the Grand Canyon" (Weidenfeld & Nicolson). and
In September, 1909, within a space of nine days, two explorers publicly claimed they had reached the North Pole. Dr. Frederick A. Cook announced first, asserting that he had made the pole on April 21, 1908. Commodore Robert E. Peary, returning from Greenland, then proclaimed that his own long-awaited conquest of the pole had succeeded on April 6, 1909--and promptly denounced Cook's claim as bogus. Cook received medals, wild public adulation, a tour of Europe. Peary met with scorn.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Polar explorer Robert E. Peary, whose legacy has been suspended in limbo the past few months as scholars debated whether he should be ranked as one of the nation's leading heroes or one of its greatest frauds, got a little help Wednesday. The nonprofit Navigation Foundation said a mysterious document that surfaced last October does not prove Peary lied when he claimed to have "discovered" the North Pole in 1909.
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | Associated Press
Six explorers trekking across the Arctic ice cap with only a sextant to guide them were only 1.7 miles from the North Pole early today. Jim Gasperini, radio operator at the base camp of the Steger International Polar Expedition in Resolute Bay, Northwest Territories, said he received a transmission at 2:30 a.m. PDT from a satellite monitoring their progress showing the explorers were at 89 degrees, 58.3 minutes north latitude, or 1.7 miles from the Soviet side of the pole.
OPINION
August 10, 2007
Re "Finders keepers in the Arctic?" Opinion, Aug. 6 The Russians are not the first to place a marker on the sea floor at the North Pole, potentially related to a claim of geographic ownership. U.S. Navy Adm. Robert E. Peary did so in April 1909 and left a permanent marker on the sea floor. In the process of taking a water depth sounding at the North Pole, his mile-long alloyed steel cable ran off of its reel and fell to the sea floor; it remains there today.
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