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Robert E Rubin

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BUSINESS
December 11, 1992 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In picking Robert E. Rubin to be the White House's economics czar Thursday, President-elect Bill Clinton no doubt is hoping that Rubin can do for the U.S. economy what his management team did for Goldman, Sachs & Co. Rubin, 54, co-chairman of the phenomenally successful investment house, presided along with his counterpart, Stephen Friedman, as Goldman Sachs solidified its preeminence on Wall Street, last year earning a record pretax profit of $1.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Robert E. Rubin, the former Treasury secretary who advised Citigroup Inc. as it lost $20 billion in the subprime mortgage crisis, resigned his position as senior counselor and won't stand for reelection to the board. Rubin, 70, intends to "deepen his involvement in outside activities and organizations to which he has been strongly committed," the New York-based bank said Friday in a statement.
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NEWS
December 7, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President-elect Clinton gathered his Administration's new economic team for its first meeting on Jan. 7, 1993, at the Governor's Mansion in Little Rock, it was unclear who would emerge as the most influential leader in a group of big egos, long resumes and rival ambitions. What's more, it was uncertain whether the team, which brought together conservatives and liberals with little in common save their ties to Bill Clinton, could reach a consensus on economic policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2004 | James Flanigan, Times Staff Writer
When Robert E. Rubin went to work as an economic advisor to President Clinton in 1993, the federal budget deficit was nearly $300 billion, 4.7% of the country's annual output of goods and services, or gross domestic product, at that time. Rubin, first as the organizer of Clinton's National Economic Council and then as secretary of the Treasury, devised the policies that eliminated that budget deficit.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Citigroup Inc. on Tuesday tapped former Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin to help run the financial services powerhouse, where he joins Sanford Weill and John Reed in a triumvirate at the top. Rubin, who quit the U.S. Treasury this summer after a four-year stint as secretary, will become chairman of the board's executive committee and join a new three-person office of the chairman. Rubin co-headed U.S. investment bank Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When global financial markets took a dive last week, threatening to worsen the Asian economic slump, the man in the spotlight was Robert E. Rubin. For 13 months, the U.S. Treasury secretary has been calling the shots on Asia--and has won widespread kudos for it. Allen Sinai, a prominent Wall Street economist, unabashedly calls Rubin "the best Treasury secretary in American history"--"almost perfect" in managing both the domestic economy and the turmoil in emerging markets overseas.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite recent volatility in the stock market, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin said stock prices over the long run will reflect the health and future prospects for the economy, which he said are good. Rubin said on CNN's "Evans and Novak" program that Clinton administration economic policymakers were not monitoring financial markets more than usual although stock prices took a roller-coaster ride last week.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | Associated Press
President Clinton's nomination of Robert E. Rubin to be Treasury secretary won quick approval Tuesday, with Rubin promising senators that the Administration will look for ways to cooperate with Congress. The full Senate confirmed Rubin's nomination, 99 to 0, without debate only hours after he had appeared for a cordial hearing before the Finance Committee. Sen. John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.) did not vote. Senators praised Rubin for his integrity and grasp of economic detail.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | From Reuters
An angry federal judge on Monday found Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin in contempt for failing to comply with his orders to produce records of American Indian trust funds. The contempt citation against two of President Clinton's most prominent Cabinet members stems from a civil lawsuit filed in 1996 by five American Indians, claiming the federal government mismanaged billions of dollars in trust funds. U.S.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Any chance of overhauling Depression-era banking laws this year dimmed Wednesday as Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin aired their differences before Congress. At a Senate Banking Committee hearing, the government's two top economic policymakers refused to bend on the appropriate structure for financial services companies that would offer bank accounts, sell insurance and trade stocks.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Citigroup Inc. on Tuesday tapped former Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin to help run the financial services powerhouse, where he joins Sanford Weill and John Reed in a triumvirate at the top. Rubin, who quit the U.S. Treasury this summer after a four-year stint as secretary, will become chairman of the board's executive committee and join a new three-person office of the chairman. Rubin co-headed U.S. investment bank Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time in Washington when the great power game was the exclusive domain of the secretary of State and the national security advisor, while the Treasury secretary was relegated to lesser pursuits. No more. In a post-Cold War world where the market is king and America's prosperity depends as much on events in Osaka as in Omaha, the job of being America's finance minister has been elevated to a status that only a Henry Kissinger or a George Kennan could truly appreciate.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin, the self-effacing Cabinet officer who helped create Clinton administration economic policy and then sold it to a skeptical financial world, announced his resignation Wednesday and will be replaced by his deputy, Lawrence H. Summers. When Rubin leaves, probably about July 4, President Clinton will lose one of his most trusted aides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate teaches at UCLA. His Pacific Prospect column runs Wednesdays. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
Robert E. Rubin, who resigned Wednesday as Treasury secretary, is a great credit to the nation and to the president he served but came across as a great enigma to the rest of the world. In Asia, especially, his elliptical views on the dangers as well as advantages of globalization were frustrating to the region of the world most terribly hit by the currency and capital crises.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | From Reuters
An angry federal judge on Monday found Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin in contempt for failing to comply with his orders to produce records of American Indian trust funds. The contempt citation against two of President Clinton's most prominent Cabinet members stems from a civil lawsuit filed in 1996 by five American Indians, claiming the federal government mismanaged billions of dollars in trust funds. U.S.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conceding that the international response to the global economic crisis has been inadequate, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin on Thursday called for a new "global financial architecture" to head off the next one. "The global economy cannot live with the kind of vast and systemic disruptions that have occurred over the last year," Rubin said, offering the most detailed U.S. description yet of possible reforms that may emerge.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a careful study of tax reform proposals, measures already introduced in Congress as well as plans dreamed up by executive branch officials, the Clinton Administration has concluded that nothing suggested so far would be better than the much-criticized existing system, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting a welling undercurrent of dissatisfaction with the Clinton administration's quiescent urban policy, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin urged President Clinton on Thursday to tackle the subject head-on with a major speech addressing the social and economic ills challenging the nation's cities. Although his call reflects the thinking of several others in Clinton's first-term Cabinet, Rubin is the most senior official to address the issue publicly.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stakes are high for the United States if Brazil, Latin America's biggest economy, falls into recession, or worse, devalues its currency, a fact underscored by an unusual telephone call of support to Brazil's president Friday by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin. In a statement to reporters, Rubin said he called President Fernando Henrique Cardoso to "express U.S.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When global financial markets took a dive last week, threatening to worsen the Asian economic slump, the man in the spotlight was Robert E. Rubin. For 13 months, the U.S. Treasury secretary has been calling the shots on Asia--and has won widespread kudos for it. Allen Sinai, a prominent Wall Street economist, unabashedly calls Rubin "the best Treasury secretary in American history"--"almost perfect" in managing both the domestic economy and the turmoil in emerging markets overseas.
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