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Robert E Tranquada

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July 10, 1991 | The following are members of the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, which was charged with investigating the LAPD in the wake of the police beating of Rodney G. King
Who: Warren Christopher, chairman. Position: Chairman, law firm of O'Melveny & Myers. Background: Deputy secretary of state under President Jimmy Carter, deputy attorney general under President Lyndon B. Johnson, vice chairman of the McCone Commission, which investigated the Watts riots. Active in Democratic politics. Who: John A. Arguelles, vice chairman. Position: With Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher Newport Beach office. Background: Retired California Supreme Court justice.
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NEWS
July 10, 1991 | The following are members of the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, which was charged with investigating the LAPD in the wake of the police beating of Rodney G. King
Who: Warren Christopher, chairman. Position: Chairman, law firm of O'Melveny & Myers. Background: Deputy secretary of state under President Jimmy Carter, deputy attorney general under President Lyndon B. Johnson, vice chairman of the McCone Commission, which investigated the Watts riots. Active in Democratic politics. Who: John A. Arguelles, vice chairman. Position: With Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher Newport Beach office. Background: Retired California Supreme Court justice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Tranquada, dean of the USC Medical School, has resigned amid continuing turmoil over the opening of a new, private university hospital last month and the financial pressures it has brought on academic departments and faculty members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two top doctors at County-USC Medical Center have threatened to shut down emergency services next month unless more money is made available to hire moonlighting physicians to help ease staff shortages. Dr. Gail Anderson, chairman of the department of emergency medicine, has said in a letter to hospital administrators that he may have to shut down the main emergency room's "walk-in" clinic on July 1. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two top doctors at County-USC Medical Center have threatened to shut down emergency services next month unless more money is made available to hire moonlighting physicians to help ease staff shortages. Dr. Gail Anderson, chairman of the department of emergency medicine, has said in a letter to hospital administrators that he may have to shut down the main emergency room's "walk-in" clinic on July 1. Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1993
What Rosenberg fails to grasp is that the segment on Dr. Michael E. Carey's research was actually a revelation of the overall philosophy of the animal rights movement--to stop all use of animals in medical research, whether humanely carried out or scientifically and medically valid or not. In fact, "60 Minutes" should be applauded for its courage in exposing the tactics of animal rights groups such as the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1986
Dr. Robert E. Tranquada, medical director of County-USC Medical Center during the early 1970s, has been named dean of the USC School of Medicine effective Sept. 1. Currently chancellor and dean at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Tranquada in his new post will lead development of the new private hospital to be constructed on the USC medical campus and will be responsible for maintaining and improving services at County-USC Medical Center, according to Dr. James H.
OPINION
December 3, 2006
Re "The stem cell money trap," Opinion, Nov. 28 Sigrid Fry-Revere is off the mark. Public funding of research is essential for three reasons. First, it removes the profit motive that adds enormous costs to the clinical application of research results. It is responsible for a substantial part of the growing costs of healthcare and guarantees that the results of that research will be in the public domain and available to all. Second, public funding is efficient. Finally, of course we should encourage private not-for-profit funding of stem cell research, but there are nowhere near the resources in the private sector that exist in government to finance such critical and essential research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992
As board chairs and presidents of the six Claremont Colleges, we salute the policy recommended in your comprehensive editorial. We endorse the editorial's message: Full funding for Cal Grants is surely in the best interests of both the taxpayers and California students. We would like to make two additional points to augment the editorial's persuasive arguments. First, the cost savings associated with using Cal Grants to encourage students to attend the 68 accredited private colleges and universities in the state is understated in the editorial.
OPINION
July 30, 2008
We got lucky this time. Count Tuesday's earthquake as a 5.4-magnitude reminder of how long it's been since Southern California had a big one, and how complacent we have become. The wild ride of the earth rolling beneath our feet delivers a jolt of fear that few other natural disasters can match. We are suddenly -- literally -- shaken into realizing that nothing in life, not even terra firma, is firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Tranquada, dean of the USC Medical School, has resigned amid continuing turmoil over the opening of a new, private university hospital last month and the financial pressures it has brought on academic departments and faculty members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1993
I was very disappointed to see The Times editorial ("What a Beast of a Budget," June 23) credit the Legislature for "doing its job" in passing this year's state budget on time. By any standard, the legislators' primary job is to represent their constituents and protect their needs. In this task, they are faltering in their fundamental duty to the people of California, particularly those residing in Los Angeles County. At this time, no budget would have been preferable to this budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Fifteen years after the Christopher Commission recommended sweeping reform of the Los Angeles Police Department, many improvements have been made, but the work is not finished, commission members said Tuesday. Civic leaders who served on the panel held an informal reunion recently at which Police Chief William J. Bratton assured them that he will complete the job they started.
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