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Robert Easton

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aside from perhaps the failed nude scene, there may be nothing quite as embarrassing for the actor as the failed accent. Think of the derision directed toward Kevin Costner for his Old English-via-Malibu turn in "Robin Hood" last year. Or listen to Melanie Griffith in this year's World War II-themed "Shining Through," caking on layers of old-age makeup for a contemporary framing device but getting giggles for talking in exactly the same light, unaged voice as in the five-decades-past flashbacks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aside from perhaps the failed nude scene, there may be nothing quite as embarrassing for the actor as the failed accent. Think of the derision directed toward Kevin Costner for his Old English-via-Malibu turn in "Robin Hood" last year. Or listen to Melanie Griffith in this year's World War II-themed "Shining Through," caking on layers of old-age makeup for a contemporary framing device but getting giggles for talking in exactly the same light, unaged voice as in the five-decades-past flashbacks.
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BOOKS
December 18, 1988 | J. B. Jackson, Jackson's most recent book is "Discovering the Vernacular Landscape" (Yale)
This is a book that architects and anthropologists and history buffs will want to own and study. It will also appeal to those who appreciate books as works of art, for it is handsomely designed and contains a great number of unusual photographs of American Indians building and living in their traditional dwellings. Many of the photographs are more than 100 years old, and their indefinable period quality makes them very evocative.
BOOKS
December 18, 1988 | J. B. Jackson, Jackson's most recent book is "Discovering the Vernacular Landscape" (Yale)
This is a book that architects and anthropologists and history buffs will want to own and study. It will also appeal to those who appreciate books as works of art, for it is handsomely designed and contains a great number of unusual photographs of American Indians building and living in their traditional dwellings. Many of the photographs are more than 100 years old, and their indefinable period quality makes them very evocative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2011 | Elaine Woo
Robert Easton, a character actor whose command of a vast array of foreign and American regional accents led to a flourishing second career as a dialect coach to Hollywood stars such as Charlton Heston and Anne Hathaway, has died. He was 81. Often called the Henry Higgins of Hollywood, he died of natural causes Friday at his home in Toluca Lake, said his daughter, Heather Woodruff Perry. A consummate phoneticist like Higgins, the exacting speech tutor in the musical "My Fair Lady," Easton taught Forest Whitaker the African inflections of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin and Ben Kingsley the gruff tones of a New York mobster.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Americans continue to read mysteries in huge numbers, and hundreds of new authors (many of them women) have been signed on by publishers to feed this appetite for whodunits. This popular genre has spawned a number of successful specialty bookstores throughout the Southland with names such as Sherlock's Home, Scene of the Crime, Mysterious Bookstore, Book'em Mysteries, Dangerous Visions, Mystery Annex, etc.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is the author of hiking books and a regular contributor to The Times
Move over, John Jakes. The best-selling author of "California Gold" has some home-grown competition in the form of a series of California historical novels by Santa Barbara writer Robert Easton. Easton's multigenerational, multivolume California series began a few years ago with the publication of "This Promised Land," which told the stories of the Chumash Indians, Spanish explorers and missionaries and the resultant clash of cultures.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, Libby Slate is a frequent contributor to TV Times and Calendar
When Santa Monica native Linda Gray won the role of Sue Ellen Ewing on "Dallas," she turned to dialect coach Robert Easton to learn a Texas accent--and was so good that she was asked to tone it down on the set because she was showing up other cast members. When Kenny Rogers did a guest stint on "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" he got into the lingo of the new Old West under the guidance of dialogue coach Steve Posner, who also helped out guest stars Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Taiwan manufacturer's suggestion that American companies buy foreign-made U.S. flags and replace "Made in Taiwan" labels with "Made in U.S.A." has caused a small uproar on Capitol Hill. "In all my years as a member of Congress, few issues have struck me as being as blatantly outrageous" as the label-switch proposal, Rep. Douglas Applegate (D-Ohio) wrote in a letter seeking a Customs Service investigation.
REAL ESTATE
March 20, 1988 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Michael Jackson is on a 13-city concert tour, but when he comes home, it probably won't be just to Encino anymore. He is buying a 2,700-acre ranch in the Santa Ynez Valley for about $28 million and a small hotel nearby, for his entourage, for $5 million, say several real estate sources. The pop star was looking at Hope Ranch in Santa Barbara but needed a more rural environment for his menagerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1995 | T. H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of the magic in Edgar Lee Masters' "Spoon River Anthology" is the universality of his incisive portraits of the turn-of-the-century citizens resting in Spoon River's cemetery. People do not change, and Masters' roll call could be read in any town today, anywhere. The rest of the magic is not only in Masters' insightful understanding of his own time and place, but especially in Charles Aidman's fluid and quite theatrical stage adaptation of the original poems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2007 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
They came from miles around for the mother of all book sales Saturday. They arrived with boxes, baskets and shopping carts to haul away used volumes by the thousands. For book lovers of all stripes, it was a momentous occasion: After 27 years as a Southern California institution, the Book Baron of Anaheim was calling it quits. "It's the end of an era," said Robert Easton, 77, a self-described "compulsive bibliophile" and Hollywood dialect coach, pushing a cart laden with more than 100 finds.
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