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BUSINESS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
DaimlerChrysler co-Chairman Robert Eaton, the former Chrysler chairman and chief executive who helped orchestrate one of the world's largest industrial mergers, will retire from the company March 31. Eaton, 59, made the announcement Wednesday at a meeting of senior managers, saying that "this is the right time for me to go." "This, of course, should be no surprise to anyone," he said. "I've said from the very beginning that when this merger is complete, I would be retiring. The time is now."
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
DaimlerChrysler co-Chairman Robert Eaton, the former Chrysler chairman and chief executive who helped orchestrate one of the world's largest industrial mergers, will retire from the company March 31. Eaton, 59, made the announcement Wednesday at a meeting of senior managers, saying that "this is the right time for me to go." "This, of course, should be no surprise to anyone," he said. "I've said from the very beginning that when this merger is complete, I would be retiring. The time is now."
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BUSINESS
March 16, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, in a repudiation of his top lieutenant, is expected today to announce the recruitment of a highly regarded General Motors executive to succeed him as chief executive. Robert J. Eaton, 52, an up-from-the-ranks auto engineer who is president of GM's highly profitable European subsidiary, would take over day-to-day control at the end of the year, when the 67-year-old Iacocca is to retire.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1996 | From Reuters
Chrysler Corp. Chairman Robert Eaton defended corporate America on Monday, arguing that big business has been unfairly maligned for focusing on profits and slashing tens of thousands of jobs. "Downsizing and layoffs are part of the price of becoming more competitive," Eaton said. "The price of not doing it, however, is much higher in both economic and human terms."
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert J. Eaton was meant to be the star at the news conference Chrysler Corp. held here Monday to announce his appointment to succeed Lee A. Iacocca as chief executive. But sandwiched between Iacocca and company President Robert Lutz--two of the auto industry's most charismatic leaders--the unimposing former General Motors Corp. executive looked out of place at his own parade.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Corp. Chairman Robert J. Eaton could hardly be blamed for gloating a bit earlier this year. His company, all but given up for dead twice in the past two decades, had emerged as the crown jewel of the U.S. auto industry. At a gathering of the world's news media at the North American International Auto Show, Eaton bragged that 1994 had been the best in the company's 69-year-history. It had posted record sales and record profit.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Shocked by Chrysler Maneuver: General Motors Corp. officials were shocked by a report that the head of GM's profitable European division may be a contender for the helm of rival Chrysler Corp. The New York Times reported that Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca had talked to GM's Robert Eaton about joining the No. 3 auto maker. The move would put the 52-year-old Eaton in the running to take over for the 67-year-old Iacocca, who retires in December.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1996 | From Reuters
Chrysler Corp. Chairman Robert Eaton defended corporate America on Monday, arguing that big business has been unfairly maligned for focusing on profits and slashing tens of thousands of jobs. "Downsizing and layoffs are part of the price of becoming more competitive," Eaton said. "The price of not doing it, however, is much higher in both economic and human terms."
BUSINESS
April 15, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Corp. Friday said it hired three investment banking firms to evaluate the takeover bid made this week by financier Kirk Kerkorian, while former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca sharply criticized his hand-picked successor at the nation's third-largest auto maker. Morgan Stanley & Co., Salomon Brothers and CS-First Boston will advise Chrysler on the $55-a-share offer from Kerkorian's Tracinda Corp., Chrysler spokesman Steven Harris said. The proposed deal has a value of $22.8 billion.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert J. Eaton says Chrysler Corp. is a fun place to work. And a lucrative place, he might add. Eaton earned $9.3 million in 1993 as Chrysler's chairman and chief executive, the company disclosed Thursday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. And he wasn't Chrysler's highest-paid executive. President Robert L. Lutz collected $9.7 million, thanks largely to $6 million in stock options.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1995 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Corp. Chairman Robert J. Eaton could hardly be blamed for gloating a bit earlier this year. His company, all but given up for dead twice in the past two decades, had emerged as the crown jewel of the U.S. auto industry. At a gathering of the world's news media at the North American International Auto Show, Eaton bragged that 1994 had been the best in the company's 69-year-history. It had posted record sales and record profit.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Corp. Friday said it hired three investment banking firms to evaluate the takeover bid made this week by financier Kirk Kerkorian, while former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca sharply criticized his hand-picked successor at the nation's third-largest auto maker. Morgan Stanley & Co., Salomon Brothers and CS-First Boston will advise Chrysler on the $55-a-share offer from Kerkorian's Tracinda Corp., Chrysler spokesman Steven Harris said. The proposed deal has a value of $22.8 billion.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert J. Eaton says Chrysler Corp. is a fun place to work. And a lucrative place, he might add. Eaton earned $9.3 million in 1993 as Chrysler's chairman and chief executive, the company disclosed Thursday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. And he wasn't Chrysler's highest-paid executive. President Robert L. Lutz collected $9.7 million, thanks largely to $6 million in stock options.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eaton Elected Chrysler Chairman: Chrysler Corp.'s board formalized the long-expected changing of the guard, voting Robert J. Eaton to replace retiring Lee A. Iacocca as head of the nation's No. 3 auto maker. Eaton, 52, was elected chairman and chief executive during a meeting in New York. The appointment takes effect Jan. 1. Eaton named company President Robert A. Lutz, 60, as chief operating officer, with responsibility for car and truck operations worldwide.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee A. Iacocca said Monday that he will step down as Chrysler Corp.'s chairman, as well as its chief executive, at the end of 1992 and turn both posts over to Robert J. Eaton, who was General Motors Corp.'s top executive in Europe. Eaton was named vice chairman and chief operating officer Monday and given a seat on Chrysler's board of directors. He will become chairman and chief executive on Dec. 31. Robert A. Lutz, who was passed over for the top jobs, will remain on as Chrysler president.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert J. Eaton was meant to be the star at the news conference Chrysler Corp. held here Monday to announce his appointment to succeed Lee A. Iacocca as chief executive. But sandwiched between Iacocca and company President Robert Lutz--two of the auto industry's most charismatic leaders--the unimposing former General Motors Corp. executive looked out of place at his own parade.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee A. Iacocca said Monday that he will step down as Chrysler Corp.'s chairman, as well as its chief executive, at the end of 1992 and turn both posts over to Robert J. Eaton, who was General Motors Corp.'s top executive in Europe. Eaton was named vice chairman and chief operating officer Monday and given a seat on Chrysler's board of directors. He will become chairman and chief executive on Dec. 31. Robert A. Lutz, who was passed over for the top jobs, will remain on as Chrysler president.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, in a repudiation of his top lieutenant, is expected today to announce the recruitment of a highly regarded General Motors executive to succeed him as chief executive. Robert J. Eaton, 52, an up-from-the-ranks auto engineer who is president of GM's highly profitable European subsidiary, would take over day-to-day control at the end of the year, when the 67-year-old Iacocca is to retire.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed inevitable that Lee A. Iacocca would not leave Chrysler Corp. in an orderly fashion, and now evidence of a boardroom quarrel over who will succeed him as chief executive is spilling awkwardly into the open. Members of Chrysler's board are reportedly to meet in New York over the weekend in hopes of hastening the selection of a successor. The 68-year-old Iacocca has said he will retire as chief executive at the end of this year.
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