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March 29, 1993 | LOUISE STEINMAN, Louise Steinman is the author of "The Knowing Body: Elements of Contemporary Performance and Dance" (Shambhala Publications). She was script consultant on the PBS film "Ishi: the Last Yahi" and performance curator at Barnsdall Art Park from 1986 to 1991.
If Lewis Segal, the seasoned dance writer, can mistake Meredith Monk's mythic landscape of the mind ("Facing North") for ethnographic reportage--we're in trouble here. Think metaphor. Segal finds Monk's chamber theater piece "suspect" because he sees a white woman artist "interpreting" another culture (" 'North' Samples a Culture," Calendar, March 15). "In 1993 we prefer artists from that culture to speak for themselves," states Segal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2005 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
ROBERT EEN plays the cello. And sings. And, quite often, conducts. All at the same time. His way of working is, to say the least, idiosyncratic. But Een, one of a respected cadre of post-Minimalist music-makers, with a seemingly boundless musical purview, makes it look and sound effortless.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2005 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
ROBERT EEN plays the cello. And sings. And, quite often, conducts. All at the same time. His way of working is, to say the least, idiosyncratic. But Een, one of a respected cadre of post-Minimalist music-makers, with a seemingly boundless musical purview, makes it look and sound effortless.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1993 | LOUISE STEINMAN, Louise Steinman is the author of "The Knowing Body: Elements of Contemporary Performance and Dance" (Shambhala Publications). She was script consultant on the PBS film "Ishi: the Last Yahi" and performance curator at Barnsdall Art Park from 1986 to 1991.
If Lewis Segal, the seasoned dance writer, can mistake Meredith Monk's mythic landscape of the mind ("Facing North") for ethnographic reportage--we're in trouble here. Think metaphor. Segal finds Monk's chamber theater piece "suspect" because he sees a white woman artist "interpreting" another culture (" 'North' Samples a Culture," Calendar, March 15). "In 1993 we prefer artists from that culture to speak for themselves," states Segal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Partly a documentary on the nine-day Los Angeles segment of a global 1999 event, "World Festival of Sacred Music--the Americas" also represents an exploration of how film and video can interpret complex cultural traditions for a wider audience. Previously available on home video, it comes to public television tonight as an 83-minute testament to the rich overlapping spiritual contexts of the Los Angeles community.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2008 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
At her best, choreographer Hae Kyung Lee can alter one's perception, transforming bone and muscle into a field of fluctuating vibration or flowing motion. Indeed, with her proclivity for combining the meditative with the highly athletic, perceptual flux is necessary for the work to cohere into something more than an amalgamation of opposing energies and elements. Otherwise, Lee's dances can look overstuffed and, well, just plain awkward.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dancer-choreographer Hae Kyung Lee, clad in a scarlet satin slip onstage at Cal State L.A.'s State Playhouse on Friday night, offered alternating depictions of rampant ecstasy and butoh-like inevitability in a ferocious performance of beating-heart virtuosity. Her solo was one of three premieres in a concert titled "Salm" -- Korean for "daily life." The other works were performed by her 15-year-old locally based troupe, Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
The good, the bad and the ugly were all on view Thursday when REDCAT's annual New Original Works Festival began the second week of its three-week, three-program series. Unfortunately, the bad and the ugly were all too prominent with Poor Dog Group's slapdash theater piece, "Hey. Hey, man. Hey." Happily, Holly Johnston's "Politics of Intimacy" proved better than good.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1991 | WILLIAM ALBRIGHT, William Albright is theater critic of the Houston Post and a contributing and consulting editor of Opera Quarterly.
Marcel Marceau has a troupe that performs wordless plays he calls mimodramas. After she retired in the '40s, soprano Miliza Korjus threatened to make a comeback in an opera about Nefertiti in which the cast would do nothing but hum. So there's nothing truly unique about the absence of text in "ATLAS," avant-garde composer Meredith Monk's new, 3 1/4-hour opera in which the only words are a few lines of spoken dialogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
In an upstairs studio at the UCLA Dance Building, two masked figures stand behind a tabletop model of a snowy hillside inserting tiny trees and then people while they sing. One voice is high, female, birdlike and the other low, male, growly. Soon the masks come off and the two performers become the figures from the model--except the white-cloth snowscape they inhabit is treeless and flat. To the mournful tones of a harmonica, they slowly stagger toward one another and hold hands. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2007 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Choreographers Bradley Michaud, Linda Lack and Hae Kyung Lee don't belong on the same program, but their clash of philosophies and styles gave an event titled "Modern Los Angeles Dances" an intense variety if not coherence as part of the free Grand Performances series at California Plaza on Saturday. Michaud's program notes for his high-velocity, high-impact Method Contemporary Dance proclaimed "no spoken word or text, no video projection or multimedia display, no play-acting."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
"In the old neighborhoods the ghosts are rising.... " Narrator Richard Azurdia stands on the stage of the Casa del Mexicano, a community center in Boyle Heights, speaking of angels, the spirits of the dead and the impermanence of all things. It's the Thursday premiere of "The Entire World Is a Narrow Bridge," and though ghosts and a sense of impermanence are familiar enough in the site-specific repertory of Heidi Duckler's locally based Collage Dance Theatre, this company vehicle is unusual.
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