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Robert Eisenman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a feisty David, Cal State Long Beach religious studies professor Robert Eisenman took on an academic Goliath and won. One result is that the Dead Sea Scrolls, long an inaccessible subject of academic curiosity, are now open to all, and Israeli officials who control the documents give Eisenman much of the credit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997
The June 8 article "Fountain Valley Author Takes on New Testament," about the Dead Sea Scrolls scholar Robert Eisenman, was a breath of fresh air. I graduated from the Claremont School of Theology in 1974, and I must say Eisenman appears to be a religious conservative compared with most of the New Testament scholars teaching then. I do not know of any modern educated biblical scholars who still treat the New Testament as a historically accurate collection of eyewitness writings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman sometimes feels as if he's being persecuted. He's been vilified by the New York Times as "incoherent" and "impossible." Publications worldwide have taken shots at his latest book. Fellow academics have distanced themselves. "He represents a marginal position," said Mike Phelps, director of the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center in Claremont. James Sanders, a professor at the Claremont School of Theology, goes further.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman sometimes feels as if he's being persecuted. He's been vilified by the New York Times as "incoherent" and "impossible." Publications worldwide have taken shots at his latest book. Fellow academics have distanced themselves. "He represents a marginal position," said Mike Phelps, director of the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center in Claremont. James Sanders, a professor at the Claremont School of Theology, goes further.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997
The June 8 article "Fountain Valley Author Takes on New Testament," about the Dead Sea Scrolls scholar Robert Eisenman, was a breath of fresh air. I graduated from the Claremont School of Theology in 1974, and I must say Eisenman appears to be a religious conservative compared with most of the New Testament scholars teaching then. I do not know of any modern educated biblical scholars who still treat the New Testament as a historically accurate collection of eyewitness writings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994
Hershel Shanks' article, "Who Owns the Dead Sea Scrolls?" (Commentary, April 4), failed to address the real issue of the scrolls: the immediate release of all scroll material in a way for all scholars to read their contents. It doesn't matter if the Jordanians, Israelis, Palestinians, British, or Americans own some or part of the scrolls. The whole world would be enriched by the scrolls being on exhibit in museums throughout the world. They cannot be the exclusive property of one religion, one people, or one culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman's five-bedroom home is at the vortex of an intellectual whirlwind of biblical proportions. Its floors are piled high with boxes of yellowed documents. Its tables are covered with pages containing obscure passages. And everywhere an atmosphere of creative disorder prevails, a sort of rumbling of the mind and spirit borne of a feverish true belief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman's five-bedroom home is at the vortex of an intellectual whirlwind of Biblical proportions. The floors are piled high with boxes of yellowed documents. Books abound, with pages open to obscure passages. And everywhere an atmosphere of creative disorder prevails, a sort of rumbling of the mind and spirit borne of a feverish true belief. "I work at home," explains Eisenman, chairman of the department of religious studies at Cal State Long Beach. "I find this very exciting."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Cal State Long Beach professor Robert Eisenman--the first scholar given official access to the Huntington Library's collection of Dead Sea Scrolls photographs--said Thursday that he had discovered a fragmentary text that describes the execution of a messiah-like leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman sometimes feels as if he's being persecuted. He's been vilified by the New York Times as "incoherent" and "impossible." Publications worldwide have taken shots at his latest book. Fellow academics have distanced themselves. "He represents a marginal position," said Mike Phelps, director of the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center in Claremont. James Sanders, a professor at the Claremont School of Theology, goes further.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman sometimes feels as if he's being persecuted. He's been vilified by the New York Times as "incoherent" and "impossible." Publications worldwide have taken shots at his latest book. Fellow academics have distanced themselves. "He represents a marginal position," said Mike Phelps, director of the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center in Claremont. James Sanders, a professor at the Claremont School of Theology, goes further.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
The late W.A. Moffett is indeed worthy of enormous praise for providing public access to the Huntington Library's photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Feb. 22). His action was one of several in 1991 that led to the collapse of a stultifying 40-year monopoly over the texts by a small clique of scholars. Since then, this critical area of ancient Jewish studies has blossomed. In your article about Moffett's illustrious career, you make a serious mistake in claiming that the monopoly was run "by a small number of Israeli scholars."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman's five-bedroom home is at the vortex of an intellectual whirlwind of Biblical proportions. The floors are piled high with boxes of yellowed documents. Books abound, with pages open to obscure passages. And everywhere an atmosphere of creative disorder prevails, a sort of rumbling of the mind and spirit borne of a feverish true belief. "I work at home," explains Eisenman, chairman of the department of religious studies at Cal State Long Beach. "I find this very exciting."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman's five-bedroom home is at the vortex of an intellectual whirlwind of biblical proportions. Its floors are piled high with boxes of yellowed documents. Its tables are covered with pages containing obscure passages. And everywhere an atmosphere of creative disorder prevails, a sort of rumbling of the mind and spirit borne of a feverish true belief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a feisty David, Cal State Long Beach religious studies professor Robert Eisenman took on an academic Goliath and won. One result is that the Dead Sea Scrolls, long an inaccessible subject of academic curiosity, are now open to all, and Israeli officials who control the documents give Eisenman much of the credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Cal State Long Beach professor Robert Eisenman--the first scholar given official access to the Huntington Library's collection of Dead Sea Scrolls photographs--said Thursday that he had discovered a fragmentary text that describes the execution of a messiah-like leader.
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