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Robert Elegant

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April 22, 1990 | CAROL THATCHER, Carol Thatcher, the daughter of British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, is a London journalist
The handsome 300-year-old Manor House at the end of the gravel drive in the manicured greenery just outside the city is quintessentially English. The cherry blossoms nod in the light breeze--"candy floss trees," as author Robert Elegant, whose home it is, calls them. Daffodils beam in the spring sunshine and weeping willows droop peacefully into a small lake. There's a mulberry tree that, local legend has it, was planted by the first Duke of Marlborough. "It may even be true," chuckles Elegant.
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TRAVEL
August 22, 1993
In an Aug. 1 letter about Robert Elegant's article ("A World of Change in China," July 11), K. C. Wu called it ". . . a very informative article . . ." I think it was "misinformative." Of a nit-picking nature, Elegant recommends the Hua Ting Sheraton in Shanghai. If this were as late as last autumn, I would have agreed, but over the winter the Sheraton instituted two price changes for a total increase of about 90%. This brought the room rate up to the top hotels in Shanghai, but with the deterioration in service, which also happened (at that time)
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TRAVEL
August 22, 1993
In an Aug. 1 letter about Robert Elegant's article ("A World of Change in China," July 11), K. C. Wu called it ". . . a very informative article . . ." I think it was "misinformative." Of a nit-picking nature, Elegant recommends the Hua Ting Sheraton in Shanghai. If this were as late as last autumn, I would have agreed, but over the winter the Sheraton instituted two price changes for a total increase of about 90%. This brought the room rate up to the top hotels in Shanghai, but with the deterioration in service, which also happened (at that time)
TRAVEL
August 1, 1993
Robert Elegant wrote a very informative article on today's China ("A World of Change in China," July 11). However, I would like to make the following corrections: 1. All reporters mistakenly call the baggy uniform a Mao uniform. The Chinese call it "Chung Shan dress" because, supposedly, it was designed by Sun Yat-sen (or Sun Chung Shan in the Mandarin pronunciation) and has been worn by Chinese since the 1920s. 2. The Sung (South) Dynasty actually established its capital in Hangzhou (not Nanjing)
TRAVEL
August 1, 1993
Robert Elegant wrote a very informative article on today's China ("A World of Change in China," July 11). However, I would like to make the following corrections: 1. All reporters mistakenly call the baggy uniform a Mao uniform. The Chinese call it "Chung Shan dress" because, supposedly, it was designed by Sun Yat-sen (or Sun Chung Shan in the Mandarin pronunciation) and has been worn by Chinese since the 1920s. 2. The Sung (South) Dynasty actually established its capital in Hangzhou (not Nanjing)
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Barbara Lloyd McMichael, McMichael is the editor for Asia Pacific Weekly, a regional publication in the Pacific Northwest. and
Less photogenic than the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, but even more revolutionary, Asia's dynamism in manufacture and trade is mushrooming into a full-blown assertion of global economic dominance. To keep from panicking, Americans to a large extent seem to be planting their heads firmly in sand. This is the situation that Robert Elegant addresses in his new book, "Pacific Destiny: Inside Asia Today."
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Phillip Knightley, Knightley is author of "The First Casualty, the War Correspondent as Hero, Propagandist and Myth-Maker, From the Crimea to Vietnam" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). and
All wars produce legends, and the war in Vietnam was no exception. Perhaps the most enduring legend about Vietnam is that the way the war was reported cost the United States a victory. Robert Elegant, a long-serving Asia expert and a former Vietnam correspondent himself, puts this view succinctly: "For the first time in modern history, the outcome of a war was determined not on the battlefield but on the printed page and, above all, on the television screen . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Evans & Novak": William Richardson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, 2:30 p.m.; repeats Sunday, 7 a.m. CNN. "John McLaughlin's One on One": Defense Secretary William Cohen, 2:30 p.m. (28). "Tony Brown's Journal": financial planning, 3:30 p.m. (28). "Capital Gang": Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), 4 and 10:30 p.m. CNN. "Larry King Weekend": Cloris Leachman, 6 and 11 p.m. CNN.
OPINION
October 23, 2002
In "Winning Hearts and Minds of the Europeans," (Opinion, Oct. 20), Seth Gitell assures himself smugly: "I felt I had done something of at least partial value by articulating the American point of view." Let's get one thing straight. This paranoid, aggressive, confrontational foreign policy that sees a military solution to every problem is not "the American point of view" but rather the view of the Bush administration. The subtext of Gitell's piece, clearly, is that if you do not endorse George W. Bush's foreign policy you are un-American.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | CAROL THATCHER, Carol Thatcher, the daughter of British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, is a London journalist
The handsome 300-year-old Manor House at the end of the gravel drive in the manicured greenery just outside the city is quintessentially English. The cherry blossoms nod in the light breeze--"candy floss trees," as author Robert Elegant, whose home it is, calls them. Daffodils beam in the spring sunshine and weeping willows droop peacefully into a small lake. There's a mulberry tree that, local legend has it, was planted by the first Duke of Marlborough. "It may even be true," chuckles Elegant.
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Barbara Lloyd McMichael, McMichael is the editor for Asia Pacific Weekly, a regional publication in the Pacific Northwest. and
Less photogenic than the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, but even more revolutionary, Asia's dynamism in manufacture and trade is mushrooming into a full-blown assertion of global economic dominance. To keep from panicking, Americans to a large extent seem to be planting their heads firmly in sand. This is the situation that Robert Elegant addresses in his new book, "Pacific Destiny: Inside Asia Today."
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | CAROLYN SEE
From a Far Land by Robert Elegant (Random House: $19.96; 735 pages). This is a late review because "From a Far Land" is a very long book and--you've heard of books you can't put down?--this is one that you can't pick up. There may exist more dull and uninspirational volumes than this at-large in this country right now, but, if so, they're lying, dusty and lifeless, on the shelves of some long-forgotten elementary school library.
BOOKS
November 29, 1992
The review of my book "The Pacific Century" by Robert Elegant (Nov. 1) was on the whole very gracious. I note, however, that Elegant, in the manner of some reviewers, saw fit to admonish me for a variety of "disturbing factual errors" which I did not make. With one exception, his corrections are incorrect. To begin with, Elegant taxes me for locating the Emperor Qianlong in the Ming Dynasty, not the Manchu Qing. He should have read more closely. I identified Qianlong as both a Qing and a Manchu Emperor.
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