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Robert Ellenstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Robert Ellenstein, an actor and director with a varied career, including a long list of Los Angeles theater productions over several decades, died Oct. 28 of natural causes at a nursing home in West Los Angeles, said his son David. He was 87. Ellenstein also had more than 20 film roles, appearing in "North by Northwest" in 1959 and "Star Trek IV" in 1986, and a long television resume that began in the mid-1950s. He was the first artistic director of the Company of Angels, co-founder and artistic director of the Los Angeles Repertory Company and a founding member of Theatre West in Hollywood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Robert Ellenstein, an actor and director with a varied career, including a long list of Los Angeles theater productions over several decades, died Oct. 28 of natural causes at a nursing home in West Los Angeles, said his son David. He was 87. Ellenstein also had more than 20 film roles, appearing in "North by Northwest" in 1959 and "Star Trek IV" in 1986, and a long television resume that began in the mid-1950s. He was the first artistic director of the Company of Angels, co-founder and artistic director of the Los Angeles Repertory Company and a founding member of Theatre West in Hollywood.
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NEWS
July 10, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ellenstein worked with Hitchcock and Cary Grant, but they weren't family. Son Peter is. Starting this week, the elder Ellenstein, 69, will be directed by his son in Clifford Odets' "Rocket to the Moon," a tale about the pursuit of dreams in the modern world. It will run through Aug. 30 at the Company of Characters Theatre in Studio City. For nine years, Peter, 30, took acting lessons from his father, who says he still has trouble relinquishing his authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All it takes is a quick, well-timed wink to the audience in the opening scene of "King Lear" for Robert Ellenstein to nail the aging monarch's foolish vanity, sowing the seeds for Shakespeare's blackest tragedy. Announcing his "retirement" and consequent subdivision of his kingdom among his three daughters (dependent on their proclamation of love for him), Ellenstein's Lear practically shivers with self-satisfaction at the shameless ritual of flattery he's set up.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Inspired by similar experiments by the Royal Shakespeare Company, Robert Ellenstein's staging of "Hamlet" uses only six actors--four men, two women. They carry no props; one rectangular box is the set. Though the colors and cuts of the clothes make subtle suggestions about the characters, the styles are modern and casual. This isn't a concert presentation; the blocking is carefully composed. But nothing is supposed to distract from the language.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY, The monthlong Fringe Festival, a mammoth undertaking that in effect was the local component of the Los Angeles Festival, ended Sunday after presenting 450 events (roughly half were theatrical productions) by 500 artists at 210 sites. Was the Festival a hit or a miss? Eight critics who covered the Fringe answer that question. and
After attending a series of sodden Fringe theater events, I've got Fringe-around-the-collar. Judging from the theater programming, the Fringe was a public relations gesture rather than an artistic endeavor. Its primary purpose was to give local artists and would-be artists the impression that they were somehow part of the Los Angeles Festival. Perhaps this was therapeutic for the participants (although a few dissenters complained that Fringe status wasn't good enough).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All it takes is a quick, well-timed wink to the audience in the opening scene of "King Lear" for Robert Ellenstein to nail the aging monarch's foolish vanity, sowing the seeds for Shakespeare's blackest tragedy. Announcing his "retirement" and consequent subdivision of his kingdom among his three daughters (dependent on their proclamation of love for him), Ellenstein's Lear practically shivers with self-satisfaction at the shameless ritual of flattery he's set up.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999
The Los Angeles Repertory Company will host a gala opening benefit performance of "King Lear" on Saturday at 7:30 p.m., followed by a reception with a gourmet buffet donated by Spago and Bistro 45. Entertainment will feature Obie and Ovation award winner Yvette Freeman and surprise guests. The event will honor the lifetime work of the company's artistic director, Robert Ellenstein, who is playing the title role, and the departure of producing director Peter Ellenstein, his son. Tickets are $50.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Most contemporary stagings of "Hamlet" end with Hamlet's corpse being borne aloft by Fortinbras' soldiers, but not the one being put on by the Los Angeles Repertory Company at Actors Center in Studio City. There's no one left to carry the body. Robert Ellenstein's production has only six players. Mainly, the device works. We understand the game from the beginning: no set, no costumes, invisible foils in the duel scene. We will see the play "in the mind's eye, Horatio."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
The creative forces behind Los Angeles Repertory Company's "Messiah," at Ivy Substation, include writer Martin Sherman, best known for his harrowing Holocaust drama "Bent," and veteran director Robert Ellenstein. How the mighty have stumbled. Despite a fascinating premise, "Messiah" is a confused mess. It's not as if the play, dating from 1983, is being workshopped. Impossible, also, to blame just the opening night technical glitches, of which there were many.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ellenstein worked with Hitchcock and Cary Grant, but they weren't family. Son Peter is. Starting this week, the elder Ellenstein, 69, will be directed by his son in Clifford Odets' "Rocket to the Moon," a tale about the pursuit of dreams in the modern world. It will run through Aug. 30 at the Company of Characters Theatre in Studio City. For nine years, Peter, 30, took acting lessons from his father, who says he still has trouble relinquishing his authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY, The monthlong Fringe Festival, a mammoth undertaking that in effect was the local component of the Los Angeles Festival, ended Sunday after presenting 450 events (roughly half were theatrical productions) by 500 artists at 210 sites. Was the Festival a hit or a miss? Eight critics who covered the Fringe answer that question. and
After attending a series of sodden Fringe theater events, I've got Fringe-around-the-collar. Judging from the theater programming, the Fringe was a public relations gesture rather than an artistic endeavor. Its primary purpose was to give local artists and would-be artists the impression that they were somehow part of the Los Angeles Festival. Perhaps this was therapeutic for the participants (although a few dissenters complained that Fringe status wasn't good enough).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Inspired by similar experiments by the Royal Shakespeare Company, Robert Ellenstein's staging of "Hamlet" uses only six actors--four men, two women. They carry no props; one rectangular box is the set. Though the colors and cuts of the clothes make subtle suggestions about the characters, the styles are modern and casual. This isn't a concert presentation; the blocking is carefully composed. But nothing is supposed to distract from the language.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | PHILIP BRANDES
Shakespeare's observation that "one man in his time plays many parts" is taken very much to heart in the Los Angeles Repertory Company's six-actor "Hamlet" at the L.A. Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Proving once again that free Shakespeare beneath the summer stars does not necessitate a compromise in quality, the Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival opens its fifth season on the grounds of California Lutheran University with that mother ship of the Bard's plays, "Hamlet." Sporting a rock-solid cast and upgraded stage facilities, the production is directed by David Ellenstein, who formerly played the melancholy Dane for his father Robert Ellenstein's Los Angeles Repertory Company.
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