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Robert Erickson

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NEWS
May 2, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Erickson, contemporary composer, author and educator who wrote California's official anthem and co-founded the UC San Diego music department, has died. He was 80. Erickson, known as a creative Modernist in his composing, died April 24 at Scripps Memorial Hospital in Encinitas, Calif. He had been bedridden for several years with polymyositis, a progressive inflammatory disease of the skeletal muscles.
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NEWS
May 2, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Erickson, contemporary composer, author and educator who wrote California's official anthem and co-founded the UC San Diego music department, has died. He was 80. Erickson, known as a creative Modernist in his composing, died April 24 at Scripps Memorial Hospital in Encinitas, Calif. He had been bedridden for several years with polymyositis, a progressive inflammatory disease of the skeletal muscles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Strange happenings at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Andre Previn and the Los Angeles Philharmonic had scheduled a world premiere on Thursday: Robert Erickson's "Corona," completed in 1986. They ended up offering only a portion of a world premiere. Although the management deemed the action worthy of neither a public announcement nor an official explanation, Previn had cut the work drastically at the last moment. How much he cut remained a mystery for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Strange happenings at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Andre Previn and the Los Angeles Philharmonic had scheduled a world premiere on Thursday: Robert Erickson's "Corona," completed in 1986. They ended up offering only a portion of a world premiere. Although the management deemed the action worthy of neither a public announcement nor an official explanation, Previn had cut the work drastically at the last moment. How much he cut remained a mystery for a while.
BOOKS
October 6, 1985 | Gordon D. Kaufman, Kaufman is professor of theology at Harvard University; his latest book is "Theology for a Nuclear Age." and
The American experience of religious pluralism in a context of religious liberty has not prepared us well to understand the demonic sorts of evil that deeply held religious convictions--including devout Christian faith--can foster. This is a question, however, well worth exploring, especially in a time of increasing religious involvement in political activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989
Several terrible thoughts come to mind regarding the "premiere" of Robert Erickson's "Corona," commissioned by the L.A. Philharmonic and radically edited by conductor Andre Previn ("Previn Wields Baton--and Scissors--for Erickson Premiere" by Martin Bernheimer, Feb. 4). Is this the start of a practice wherein conductors will assume absolute authority over compositions and alter them to suit their and the presumed audience's taste? Will a composition performed in Houston be completely different when performed in New York?
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
E! News correspondent Jason Kennedy has leased a house in the vicinity of Beverly Hills for $7,900 a month. The contemporary, built in 2008, includes three stories and an elevator. The first level contains three guest bedrooms, an office/bonus room and a home theater. On the second are the main living areas and a deck with an infinity pool. The master bedroom suite sits on the third floor for a total of four bedrooms and four bathrooms. It has a separate entrance and stairs leading to a rooftop deck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1998 | S.J. CAHN
The Simi Valley Council on Aging is scheduled to release a long-range plan today, outlining how the city should handle an anticipated 60% increase in its senior population over the next two decades. About 8.3% of Simi Valley's population is 65 or older. By 2020, senior citizens are expected to account for 13% of the city's population. Consequently, the council's concerns include a lack of affordable housing for seniors as well as the need for residential-care facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
A U.S. passport was included in the fanciful collage that decorated the program for Wednesday evening's SONOR concert at UC San Diego's Mandeville Auditorium. At the invitation of the West German government, the university's 25-member avant-garde chamber ensemble will be performing in the 34th annual Darmstadt contemporary music festival this July.
BOOKS
October 6, 1985 | Gordon D. Kaufman, Kaufman is professor of theology at Harvard University; his latest book is "Theology for a Nuclear Age." and
The American experience of religious pluralism in a context of religious liberty has not prepared us well to understand the demonic sorts of evil that deeply held religious convictions--including devout Christian faith--can foster. This is a question, however, well worth exploring, especially in a time of increasing religious involvement in political activity.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Zsa Zsa Gabor's Bel-Air estate is back on the market at $14.9 million — up from the $12.9 million it was priced at in March. The property received a notice of default in February that was rescinded this month when Gabor's ninth husband, Frederic Prinz von Anhalt, paid off one home loan and secured a larger one. More than $6 million is owed on the house, according to public records. The French Normandy-style mansion sits on a 1-acre-plus gated site with 270-degree views from downtown L.A. to the ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1994 | JOSEF WOODARD
Next year will mark the 20th anniversary of the UC San Diego-based contemporary music ensemble Sonor, making it one of the older such groups around. If new-music concerts often seem like a cross between a revival meeting and a day in court, Sonor has become expert at pleading its case. Monday at the Japan America Theatre, part of the L.A. Philharmonic's "Green Umbrella" series, Sonor delivered an often compelling program in which the best-known composer was Iannis Xenakis.
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