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Robert Evans

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Susan King
In his new memoir, "The Fat Lady Sang," legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans recalls taking an overnight flight from Los Angeles to New York in the late 1950s when he was an up-and-coming film actor. The plane had six sleeping berths in the tail area. Evans was in the upper-middle berth, an aging movie diva was in the lower berth and the infamous gossip monger Walter Winchell was nearby occupying another. Sometime during the red-eye, Evans and the film star - who to this day he won't name - had a quick fling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Susan King
In his new memoir, "The Fat Lady Sang," legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans recalls taking an overnight flight from Los Angeles to New York in the late 1950s when he was an up-and-coming film actor. The plane had six sleeping berths in the tail area. Evans was in the upper-middle berth, an aging movie diva was in the lower berth and the infamous gossip monger Walter Winchell was nearby occupying another. Sometime during the red-eye, Evans and the film star - who to this day he won't name - had a quick fling.
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BUSINESS
June 4, 1993 | ALAN CITRON
With the exception of Frank Sinatra, it is tough to imagine anyone who has been up and down and over and out more than producer Robert Evans. He was Hollywood's golden boy in the 1970s, before drugs and a thorny murder case knocked him off his lofty perch. Now, just as he is supposed to be staging his comeback with the movie "Sliver," trouble is trailing him again.
IMAGE
February 24, 2008 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
The setting -- Woodland, the Beverly Hills estate once owned by Greta Garbo -- is glamorous old Hollywood, and so is the host, Robert Evans -- legendary producer and Hollywood force of nature. For a pre-Oscar luncheon last week, Evans set the stage with black-and-white couches scattered around the frontyard pool and bowls of hydrangeas topped with diamond jewelry from Van Cleef & Arpels. Every other guest seems to be wearing sunglasses so dark they could stare right into the sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2002
After sauntering to Sundance and holding court at Cannes, barnstorming Robert Evans--the former boy toy-turned-studio-chief-turned disgraced Hollywood pasha--will finally bring his trademark throaty roar and suave '60s panache to multiplexes across America on Friday with the release of "The Kid Stays in the Picture," the documentary, or rather, hagiography about his life.
IMAGE
February 24, 2008 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
The setting -- Woodland, the Beverly Hills estate once owned by Greta Garbo -- is glamorous old Hollywood, and so is the host, Robert Evans -- legendary producer and Hollywood force of nature. For a pre-Oscar luncheon last week, Evans set the stage with black-and-white couches scattered around the frontyard pool and bowls of hydrangeas topped with diamond jewelry from Van Cleef & Arpels. Every other guest seems to be wearing sunglasses so dark they could stare right into the sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
For the record, the interview with Robert Evans was conducted in his bedroom. On the bed. On top of the mink bedspread that was a gift from good friend and French film star Alain Delon, custom-made by Dior. With the butler and an assistant in attendance, bearing Cosmopolitans and melon pieces (the cocktails were declined, the honeydew accepted).
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a perverse moment in history, I was fascinated by the real estate shows on cable television, the ones where you get to glide through a house that's for sale while a soothing voice describes the details. There was something about the tortured syntax that amazed me: The sentences weren't just backward, they were fractured in the middle and reset, wrong ends out. It was English from outer space. Perhaps Robert Evans wrote their scripts on the side.
NEWS
July 26, 2002 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'll show you what style is," purred Robert Evans in his melodious growl as he ushered a visitor into the bedroom of his Regency Revival home in Beverly Hills. Evans, the first and only actor appointed head of a major movie studio, isn't talking about the room's velvet appointments, or the mink bedspread--a gift from Alain Delon--or even the autographed, oversized Helmut Newton prints hanging on his silky walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary movie producer Robert Evans, dressed smartly in a camel's hair overcoat and beige turtleneck, saunters into a Main Street restaurant for a round of media interviews for a new film about his remarkable life in Hollywood called "The Kid Stays in the Picture," which was to premiere here Friday night at the Sundance Film Festival. He is now 71, four years removed from a paralyzing stroke that struck with typical Evans flair while he was delivering a toast to horror-meister Wes Craven.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Robert Evans has always done business in bed. In the late 1960s and early '70s, when he was chief of Paramount Pictures, it was there -- under his 18th century velvet-paneled headboard -- that he closed the deals for such classic films as "The Godfather." When he pursued the actress he would later marry, Ali MacGraw, to star in the tragic romance "Love Story," she told him yes while lounging atop his famous mink bedspread.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004 | Don Shirley
Former movie mogul Robert Evans plans to star in his own autobiographical Broadway show next spring, tentatively titled "Kid Notorious" -- like the animated Comedy Central series based on his life. He and Dick Van Patten, a former comrade from their days as young actors in New York, will tell stories about those days as well as Evans' later Hollywood career, accompanied by film clips.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
For the record, the interview with Robert Evans was conducted in his bedroom. On the bed. On top of the mink bedspread that was a gift from good friend and French film star Alain Delon, custom-made by Dior. With the butler and an assistant in attendance, bearing Cosmopolitans and melon pieces (the cocktails were declined, the honeydew accepted).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2002 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
What could it possibly say about today's movie business that the coolest guy in Hollywood is an over-the-hill 72-year-old ex-studio chief who hasn't had a hit in years? That would be larger-than-life producer Robert Evans, star of "The Kid Stays in the Picture," a new documentary about the long-ago head of Paramount Pictures that has generated a tidal wave of glowing reviews and press coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Kid Stays in the Picture," a witty, colorful and poignant account of the life and times of producer Robert Evans, takes its title from a remark made by movie mogul Darryl F. Zanuck. With scant acting experience, Evans had been cast as a matador in "The Sun Also Rises," and so chagrined at this turn of events were Ernest Hemingway, Tyrone Power, Ava Gardner and Eddie Albert that they sent Zanuck a telegram demanding Evans' removal.
NEWS
July 26, 2002 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'll show you what style is," purred Robert Evans in his melodious growl as he ushered a visitor into the bedroom of his Regency Revival home in Beverly Hills. Evans, the first and only actor appointed head of a major movie studio, isn't talking about the room's velvet appointments, or the mink bedspread--a gift from Alain Delon--or even the autographed, oversized Helmut Newton prints hanging on his silky walls.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Robert Evans has always done business in bed. In the late 1960s and early '70s, when he was chief of Paramount Pictures, it was there -- under his 18th century velvet-paneled headboard -- that he closed the deals for such classic films as "The Godfather." When he pursued the actress he would later marry, Ali MacGraw, to star in the tragic romance "Love Story," she told him yes while lounging atop his famous mink bedspread.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1998 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
When Robert Evans thinks about his life--its dizzy highs and devastating lows--the 67-year-old movie producer is confident of one thing: The saga has all the makings of a great motion picture. Evans does more than muse about this. In the private editing room of his lavish Beverly Hills estate, he has spliced actual television sound bites into a montage that he thinks is the perfect opening sequence for a film about himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2002
After sauntering to Sundance and holding court at Cannes, barnstorming Robert Evans--the former boy toy-turned-studio-chief-turned disgraced Hollywood pasha--will finally bring his trademark throaty roar and suave '60s panache to multiplexes across America on Friday with the release of "The Kid Stays in the Picture," the documentary, or rather, hagiography about his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary movie producer Robert Evans, dressed smartly in a camel's hair overcoat and beige turtleneck, saunters into a Main Street restaurant for a round of media interviews for a new film about his remarkable life in Hollywood called "The Kid Stays in the Picture," which was to premiere here Friday night at the Sundance Film Festival. He is now 71, four years removed from a paralyzing stroke that struck with typical Evans flair while he was delivering a toast to horror-meister Wes Craven.
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