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Robert F Collins

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NEWS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was sentenced to six years and 10 months in prison for scheming with a politically connected New Orleans businessman to split a drug smuggler's $100,000 payoff. The businessman, John Ross, was sentenced to seven years and four months in prison. Collins and Ross were convicted in June of bribery, conspiracy and obstruction of justice in a scheme to take a bribe from a convicted marijuana smuggler.
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NEWS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was sentenced to six years and 10 months in prison for scheming with a politically connected New Orleans businessman to split a drug smuggler's $100,000 payoff. The businessman, John Ross, was sentenced to seven years and four months in prison. Collins and Ross were convicted in June of bribery, conspiracy and obstruction of justice in a scheme to take a bribe from a convicted marijuana smuggler.
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NEWS
June 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was convicted Saturday of scheming to split a $100,000 bribe from a drug smuggler, making him the first federal judge in the 200-year history of the judiciary to be found guilty of taking a bribe. Collins, who was caught with $16,500 in FBI-marked money, was the first black to be named to a federal judgeship in the Deep South.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was convicted Saturday of scheming to split a $100,000 bribe from a drug smuggler, making him the first federal judge in the 200-year history of the judiciary to be found guilty of taking a bribe. Collins, who was caught with $16,500 in FBI-marked money, was the first black to be named to a federal judgeship in the Deep South.
NEWS
November 13, 1986
A federal judge threw out the U.S. Customs Service's employee drug testing program in a decision that a lawyer said may indicate whether President Reagan's program will hold up in court. U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins ruled in New Orleans that the customs program was unconstitutional because it constituted illegal and unwarranted search and seizure.
NEWS
November 21, 1986
The Justice Department announced it will appeal a federal court ruling that overturned the U.S. Customs Service's drug testing program. In a motion filed with the U.S. District Court in New Orleans, the Justice Department sought a suspension of the Nov. 14 order issued by Judge Robert F. Collins in which he found the Customs Service's drug testing program unconstitutional. The department said it wants a stay of the ruling pending appeal.
NEWS
January 14, 1987 | United Press International
The U.S. Customs Service may not subject its 120,000 employees to drug tests while it appeals a ruling that stopped the tests ordered by President Reagan, a federal appeals court ruled today. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a government request to block a lower court order barring the testing. U.S. District Judge Robert F.
NEWS
November 22, 1986 | Associated Press
The U.S. Customs Service said Friday it is instituting a hiring freeze for 3,000 positions involving narcotics interdiction because a federal judge overturned the agency's employee drug-testing program. Customs Commissioner William von Raab said in a statement filed in U.S. District Court in New Orleans that the hiring, part of the Reagan Administration's and Congress' stepped-up war on drugs, "cannot go forward at this time without drug screening."
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Forging ahead with its anti-drug campaign despite legal uncertainties and worker opposition, the Reagan Administration said Thursday that its drug testing program will ensure privacy for the testing of federal employees and high accuracy of test results. "These guidelines provide the greatest possible privacy for the individual, consistency in testing procedures, security for specimens and accuracy in test results," Health and Human Services Secretary Otis R.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | From the Washington Post
In its major move to carry out President Reagan's call for a drug-free federal workplace, the Office of Personnel Management has written regulations that appear to depart from the President's assurances to federal workers that drug users will not be fired. Federal workers in sensitive positions may be fired for a single instance of illegal drug use and must be dismissed for a second offense, the new guidelines say.
NEWS
November 15, 1986 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Two federal court rulings this week have cast doubt on whether the government may test its workers for drugs. In a case in New Orleans, seen as the first test of President Reagan's plan to examine 1.1 million federal employees for drug use, a federal judge ruled that urinalysis of all U.S. Customs Service workers seeking promotions was "a gross invasion of the right to privacy." In another case, a federal judge in Chattanooga, Tenn.
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