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Robert F Kennedy Journalism Award

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OPINION
May 31, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Jack Ohman, editorial cartoonist at the Portland Oregonian, received the 2009 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award this week in Washington. The RFK, known as the poor people's Pulitzer in journalism circles, was established in 1968 by a group of reporters assigned to RFK's presidential campaign. It honors coverage of "the lives and strife of disadvantaged people throughout the world."
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OPINION
May 31, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Jack Ohman, editorial cartoonist at the Portland Oregonian, received the 2009 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award this week in Washington. The RFK, known as the poor people's Pulitzer in journalism circles, was established in 1968 by a group of reporters assigned to RFK's presidential campaign. It honors coverage of "the lives and strife of disadvantaged people throughout the world."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Chase Is Back: Sylvia Chase, who left "20/20" in 1986 for a news-anchor job at KRON-TV in San Francisco, is returning to ABC as a correspondent for "PrimeTime Live" as of Oct. 15. In her last year at KRON, Chase won a George Foster Peabody Award for a documentary on Bay Area homeless and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for a program on infant mortality among the poor. Chase said that she is making the move because she wants to be part of the national and international reporting scene
NEWS
April 5, 1996
Three Los Angeles Times reporters were named winners of a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for articles detailing the plight of Third World children dying of preventable, curable diseases, the head of the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial announced Thursday. John-Thor Dahlburg, John Balzar and Juanita Darling will receive the International Print Award on May 2 at the Freedom Forum World Center in Arlington, Va.
OPINION
January 24, 1993
Paul Conrad, three-time Pulitzer Prize winner and political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times since 1964, will retire from the newspaper on March 31. Conrad, 68, will continue to have his cartoons distributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate. His cartoons will appear twice a week in The Times, which will also continue to carry the work of a variety of other editorial cartoonists. While on the Times staff, Conrad was awarded Pulitzer Prizes in 1971 and 1984.
NEWS
May 2, 1997
Los Angeles Times Orange County Edition photojournalist Gail Fisher's photo-essay of inner-city teenagers enrolled in a Santa Ana ballet school was honored Thursday with a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and Times travel writer Christopher Reynolds was named Lowell Thomas Travel Journalist of 1997. The prize was for Fisher's 35 pictures that appeared in a special section titled "Shelter on Stage," which chronicled the troubled lives of five youngsters who turned to the St.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Times photographer Clarence Williams' images of children living with neglectful parents who abuse drugs or alcohol were honored Wednesday with a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, a prize recognizing outstanding coverage of issues facing society's disadvantaged. Williams' photographs accompanied The Times' two-part series "Orphans of Addiction." "Williams brought nationwide attention to the plight of young children living in substance-abusing families," the judges wrote.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Times Orange County Edition photojournalist Gail Fisher's photo essay of inner-city teens enrolled in a Santa Ana ballet school was honored Thursday with a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, a prestigious prize recognizing outstanding coverage of issues facing society's disadvantaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Paul Conrad, the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist whose work has outraged and delighted readers of The Times for the past 30 years, has donated his archive to the Huntington Library in San Marino. The gift consists of several thousand drawings and sketches for cartoons, created over the course of Conrad's career at the newspaper, from 1964 to the present. Subjects of the cartoons include U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court threw out the murder conviction of an award-winning prison magazine editor on Friday, saying the grand jury that indicted him in 1961 violated the Constitution by excluding blacks from the panel. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled that Wilbert Rideau must be freed if he is not retried within a reasonable period of time. Rideau, who is black, was 19 when he was convicted by a nearly all-white jury of killing a bank teller.
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