Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert F Peckham
IN THE NEWS

Robert F Peckham

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Mary Amaya was stunned that day in May, 1987, when she opened a letter from Alder Junior High School in Fontana and read what it had to say about her younger son, Demond Crawford. What disturbed her was not the recommendation that her son be tested for learning disabilities. She had been baffled by Demond's recent poor performance in school and welcomed the chance to get to the bottom of things. What did upset her, she said last week, was the letter's postscript.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Peckham, who issued landmark orders on police desegregation and IQ testing during a 23-year judicial career, died Tuesday of complications after heart surgery at Stanford University Hospital, a court spokesman said. He was 72. Peckham was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 after seven years as a Santa Clara County Superior Court judge.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Peckham, who issued landmark orders on police desegregation and IQ testing during a 23-year judicial career, died Tuesday of complications after heart surgery at Stanford University Hospital, a court spokesman said. He was 72. Peckham was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 after seven years as a Santa Clara County Superior Court judge.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Mary Amaya was stunned that day in May, 1987, when she opened a letter from Alder Junior High School in Fontana and read what it had to say about her younger son, Demond Crawford. What disturbed her was not the recommendation that her son be tested for learning disabilities. She had been baffled by Demond's recent poor performance in school and welcomed the chance to get to the bottom of things. What did upset her, she said last week, was the letter's postscript.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prosecutors in the corruption retrial of federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar concluded their case with the testimony of Aguilar's colleague, Robert F. Peckham, former chief judge for the Northern California federal court district, and two FBI agents. Peckham and the agents who followed as defense witnesses testified that in the summer of 1987, the FBI agents saw Aguilar, 59, lunching with Abe Chapman, 84, a self-described mob hit man in the 1930s who also had several drug convictions.
NEWS
June 26, 1986
A long-standing federal court ban on the use of IQ tests to decide which schoolchildren should be placed in educable mentally retarded (EMR) classes was upheld by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The jurists concluded in a split decision that San Francisco District Court Judge Robert F.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
Larry Layton, facing life in prison for conspiring to kill Rep. Leo Ryan and a diplomat in the Jonestown murder-suicide, said he wants a new lawyer to replace the one who has defended him for the last five years. Robert Bryan, the new lawyer, told San Francisco U.S. District Judge Robert F.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | Associated Press
Fifteen years after Jose Vasquez sued the San Jose School District to end segregation at his son's school, his three grandchildren will join nearly 30,000 students today on the first day of court-ordered desegregation. About 6,000 students ages 5 to 18 were expected to ride buses between the more affluent and white southern part of the district and the Mexican and Asian areas in the north. The district is 55% white, 31% Latino, 10% Asian, 2.5% black, plus American Indians and other groups.
NEWS
April 29, 1985 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court today let stand a ruling that will force an end to the segregation of Latino students in San Jose public schools. The justices, without comment, refused to review a federal appeals court decision that the longstanding segregation of Latino students from Anglo students was intentional and therefore unconstitutional.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television and still cameras, which have gone everywhere from the moon to the bottom of the ocean, will finally creep into a few federal courts under a plan approved Wednesday by the top judges of the U.S. court system. Beginning next July, six federal trial courts and two appellate courts will get permission to allow news cameras to photograph, record and broadcast civil proceedings. However, cameras will not be allowed during trials or appeals of criminal cases.
NEWS
October 11, 1986 | LONN JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
Former Peoples Temple member Larry Layton went on trial again Friday on federal charges of conspiring to kill a U.S. congressman and diplomat just hours before the mass suicide-murder in Jonestown that took the lives of cult leader Jim Jones and 912 followers.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge on Monday derailed a Reagan Administration effort to sell up to 311 federally subsidized housing projects nationwide in a ruling that could complicate future attempts to transfer government-backed loans to private investors. In issuing the preliminary injunction barring sales that were to become final on Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Robert F. Peckham chastised the Housing and Urban Development Department for failing to consider the effects on low-income tenants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|