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Robert Ferrigno

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April 8, 1990 | Aram Saroyan, Saroyan's books include "The Romantics," "Last Rites" and "Trio."
The jacket blurb for "The Horse Latitudes" by Robert Ferrigno, a newspaper feature writer, tells us that the book "brilliantly subsumes the conventions of noir literature." And from the beginning, it's true, there's no mistaking the mood indigo of Danny DiMedici, a retired dope dealer who pines for his ex-wife, Lauren Keil: "There were nights when Danny missed Lauren so bad that he wanted to take a fat man and throw him through a plate-glass window."
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February 15, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
IN skillful hands, so-called imaginative and science fiction can be more than entertaining. It can be a kind of cultural tripwire, alerting readers to the impulses, apprehensions and preoccupations stirring beyond the boundaries of "serious" or "responsible" writing. During the McCarthy era and in the depths of the Cold War, for example, stories of biologically enforced conformity, telepathic mind control and post-nuclear war desolation were staples of the genre.
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February 18, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Robert Ferrigno was hunkered down in his Belmont Shore apartment in Long Beach writing what he thought would be the follow-up to "The Horse Latitudes," his critically acclaimed Southern California-set noir first novel. But after struggling for nearly a year on a new novel with a "radical environmental theme," the former Orange County journalist realized he was working on a book he didn't really want to write. "I was just totally bored with it," he said.
BOOKS
October 17, 2004 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a regular contributor to Book Review.
A rift is a cleft, a rending, a fissure. It also can describe schism, division, dissension, a break in friendly relations between individuals, groups or nations. It is the latter definition to which Raelynn Hillhouse's "Rift Zone" refers: fissures that cleave Soviets and their restive East German vassals in spring 1989, and also their ruling clans, Stalinists and Gorbachevites, stick-in-the-muds and reformists. We know now that the reformists won. Sort of.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ferrigno took a long cruise along the Orange County coastline Tuesday, but it wasn't an ordinary afternoon drive. The Long Beach author of the best-selling romantic thriller "The Horse Latitudes" was scouting movie locations with producer Michael Shamberg and Australian screenwriter Anthony Schaeffer. Ferrigno, a former newspaper feature writer, sold the movie rights to his 1990 first novel for an undisclosed sum last spring to Tri-Star Pictures.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer and
Former Orange County newspaper writer Robert Ferrigno, whose incomplete first novel earned him a heady $150,000 advance when it sold to William Morrow & Co./Avon last November, says he was "thrilled" when a book-sized, bound copy of his uncorrected manuscript arrived at his Long Beach home recently. "I never realized how good a plain wrapper could look," he said with a laugh.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush with the success of his debut romantic crime thriller, "The Horse Latitudes," Robert Ferrigno abandoned his two-bedroom apartment in Long Beach in 1991 and moved his family to a place where he could get more bang for his buck: Kirkland, Wash., a woodsy, lakefront community 12 minutes from downtown Seattle. The former Orange County newspaper feature writer and one-time professional poker player, who has set all four of his stylishly written noir thrillers along the L.A.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ferrigno vividly recalls the late nights nearly four years ago when he would retreat to Alamitos Bay in Long Beach. His wife, Jody, was bedridden, suffering complications during her pregnancy with their son, Jake. As a way of coping with his "incredible feeling of helplessness," Ferrigno would slip out of their warm Belmont Shore apartment after she was asleep and swim in the cold, dark bay.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
IN skillful hands, so-called imaginative and science fiction can be more than entertaining. It can be a kind of cultural tripwire, alerting readers to the impulses, apprehensions and preoccupations stirring beyond the boundaries of "serious" or "responsible" writing. During the McCarthy era and in the depths of the Cold War, for example, stories of biologically enforced conformity, telepathic mind control and post-nuclear war desolation were staples of the genre.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"He wasn't a dancer," writes Robert Ferrigno about a man named Quinn, the troubled hero of "Dead Man's Dance," "but he had some moves."
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush with the success of his debut romantic crime thriller, "The Horse Latitudes," Robert Ferrigno abandoned his two-bedroom apartment in Long Beach in 1991 and moved his family to a place where he could get more bang for his buck: Kirkland, Wash., a woodsy, lakefront community 12 minutes from downtown Seattle. The former Orange County newspaper feature writer and one-time professional poker player, who has set all four of his stylishly written noir thrillers along the L.A.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the quirky subcultures and out-there personalities of Southern California that have long ignited Robert Ferrigno's writing. Steroid-pumped bodybuilders. Ferrari owners. Auto repo men. Surf bums. Women who compete in bar bikini contests. "I was always interested in subcultures--high or low, it didn't matter," says Ferrigno, 49, who in the 1980s was an Orange County newspaper features writer.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"He wasn't a dancer," writes Robert Ferrigno about a man named Quinn, the troubled hero of "Dead Man's Dance," "but he had some moves."
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novelist Robert Ferrigno was channel surfing Wednesday morning when he landed on "Good Morning America" and, he said, he almost spilled his coffee in his lap. * In a segment on the best books of the summer, book reviewer Digby Diehl held up a copy of "Dead Man's Dance," Ferrigno's latest Orange County-set suspense thriller. For Ferrigno, it was the kind of day most authors can only dream of having.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Robert Ferrigno was hunkered down in his Belmont Shore apartment in Long Beach writing what he thought would be the follow-up to "The Horse Latitudes," his critically acclaimed Southern California-set noir first novel. But after struggling for nearly a year on a new novel with a "radical environmental theme," the former Orange County journalist realized he was working on a book he didn't really want to write. "I was just totally bored with it," he said.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ferrigno took a long cruise along the Orange County coastline Tuesday, but it wasn't an ordinary afternoon drive. The Long Beach author of the best-selling romantic thriller "The Horse Latitudes" was scouting movie locations with producer Michael Shamberg and Australian screenwriter Anthony Schaeffer. Ferrigno, a former newspaper feature writer, sold the movie rights to his 1990 first novel for an undisclosed sum last spring to Tri-Star Pictures.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the quirky subcultures and out-there personalities of Southern California that have long ignited Robert Ferrigno's writing. Steroid-pumped bodybuilders. Ferrari owners. Auto repo men. Surf bums. Women who compete in bar bikini contests. "I was always interested in subcultures--high or low, it didn't matter," says Ferrigno, 49, who in the 1980s was an Orange County newspaper features writer.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novelist Robert Ferrigno was channel surfing Wednesday morning when he landed on "Good Morning America" and, he said, he almost spilled his coffee in his lap. * In a segment on the best books of the summer, book reviewer Digby Diehl held up a copy of "Dead Man's Dance," Ferrigno's latest Orange County-set suspense thriller. For Ferrigno, it was the kind of day most authors can only dream of having.
BOOKS
April 8, 1990 | Aram Saroyan, Saroyan's books include "The Romantics," "Last Rites" and "Trio."
The jacket blurb for "The Horse Latitudes" by Robert Ferrigno, a newspaper feature writer, tells us that the book "brilliantly subsumes the conventions of noir literature." And from the beginning, it's true, there's no mistaking the mood indigo of Danny DiMedici, a retired dope dealer who pines for his ex-wife, Lauren Keil: "There were nights when Danny missed Lauren so bad that he wanted to take a fat man and throw him through a plate-glass window."
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Ferrigno vividly recalls the late nights nearly four years ago when he would retreat to Alamitos Bay in Long Beach. His wife, Jody, was bedridden, suffering complications during her pregnancy with their son, Jake. As a way of coping with his "incredible feeling of helplessness," Ferrigno would slip out of their warm Belmont Shore apartment after she was asleep and swim in the cold, dark bay.
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