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Robert Forster

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011
'Jackie Brown' Robert Forster earned a supporting actor Oscar nomination for his memorable turn as the world-weary bail bondsman Max Cherry who finds love in Quentin Tarantino's 1997 thriller based on an Elmore Leonard novel. 'Medium Cool' Forster received acclaim for his performance as John Cassellis, a TV news cameraman who falls for a widow in Haskell Wexler's unconventional 1969 drama that intersperses documentary footage into the narrative. Banyon Forster made his first foray into series TV with this 1972-73 NBC detective show, produced by Quinn Martin, in which he played 1930s L.A. gumshoe Miles C. Banyon.
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NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
During award season, any role smaller than nomination-size tends to get overlooked. But sometimes those small roles do more than support the lead actors. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes of screen time to shock an audience, to illuminate years of the main character's life or, in some cases, to set the film's third act on its head. Here we talk to three such performers — at various stages in their careers — who all had a powerful effect on the films they inhabited and came away richer for it. ROBERT FORSTER: Scott Thorson, "The Descendants" For a small role that literally packs a punch, look no further than Robert Forster's.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
When Robert Forster isn't working, you can find him at his office: a corner table on the patio of the Silver Spoon coffee shop on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood. He's hung out there for the last 28 years and has called that particular table his home away from home for the last two decades. The 69-year-old veteran of such films as Quentin Tarantino's "Jackie Brown," for which he earned an Oscar nomination, and Haskell Wexler's innovative "Medium Cool" was a Schwab's drugstore regular until it closed in 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011
'Jackie Brown' Robert Forster earned a supporting actor Oscar nomination for his memorable turn as the world-weary bail bondsman Max Cherry who finds love in Quentin Tarantino's 1997 thriller based on an Elmore Leonard novel. 'Medium Cool' Forster received acclaim for his performance as John Cassellis, a TV news cameraman who falls for a widow in Haskell Wexler's unconventional 1969 drama that intersperses documentary footage into the narrative. Banyon Forster made his first foray into series TV with this 1972-73 NBC detective show, produced by Quinn Martin, in which he played 1930s L.A. gumshoe Miles C. Banyon.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
During award season, any role smaller than nomination-size tends to get overlooked. But sometimes those small roles do more than support the lead actors. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes of screen time to shock an audience, to illuminate years of the main character's life or, in some cases, to set the film's third act on its head. Here we talk to three such performers — at various stages in their careers — who all had a powerful effect on the films they inhabited and came away richer for it. ROBERT FORSTER: Scott Thorson, "The Descendants" For a small role that literally packs a punch, look no further than Robert Forster's.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: The campaign trail ended at Cineplex Odeon Universal Studios Theater on Thursday night as celebrities, fans and VIPs gathered for the premiere of Mike Nichols' "Primary Colors," adapted from the anonymously written novel of political and sexual high and low jinks during a presidential primary. (Political columnist Joe Klein has long since admitted to writing the novel, but the credits cite the book by Anonymous.) The film stars John Travolta as the tubby Southern Gov. Bill . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Diamond Men" is a very small film but a sweet one, an easygoing venture of the feel-good variety. What sets it apart is something even larger pictures often lack: an excellent performance by its star. Robert Forster is something of a cult figure among working actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2001 | Times staff writers
The fruits of unprecedented cooperative efforts among the major record companies and television and cable networks will arrive in record stores starting Tuesday, when the all-star double-CD "The Concert for New York City" is released by Columbia Records. That was the Oct. 20 concert at Madison Square Garden, a collaborative effort among VH1, Cablevision, Miramax and America Online whose lineup included Paul McCartney, the Who, David Bowie, Elton John, Destiny's Child and Billy Joel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
When Robert Forster isn't working, you can find him at his office: a corner table on the patio of the Silver Spoon coffee shop on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood. He's hung out there for the last 28 years and has called that particular table his home away from home for the last two decades. The 69-year-old veteran of such films as Quentin Tarantino's "Jackie Brown," for which he earned an Oscar nomination, and Haskell Wexler's innovative "Medium Cool" was a Schwab's drugstore regular until it closed in 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Diamond Men" is a very small film but a sweet one, an easygoing venture of the feel-good variety. What sets it apart is something even larger pictures often lack: an excellent performance by its star. Robert Forster is something of a cult figure among working actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2001 | Times staff writers
The fruits of unprecedented cooperative efforts among the major record companies and television and cable networks will arrive in record stores starting Tuesday, when the all-star double-CD "The Concert for New York City" is released by Columbia Records. That was the Oct. 20 concert at Madison Square Garden, a collaborative effort among VH1, Cablevision, Miramax and America Online whose lineup included Paul McCartney, the Who, David Bowie, Elton John, Destiny's Child and Billy Joel.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: The campaign trail ended at Cineplex Odeon Universal Studios Theater on Thursday night as celebrities, fans and VIPs gathered for the premiere of Mike Nichols' "Primary Colors," adapted from the anonymously written novel of political and sexual high and low jinks during a presidential primary. (Political columnist Joe Klein has long since admitted to writing the novel, but the credits cite the book by Anonymous.) The film stars John Travolta as the tubby Southern Gov. Bill . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
A television movie about the effort to bring BTK killer Dennis Rader to justice is in production for CBS and will air in October, the network said Tuesday. "The Hunt for the BTK Killer" stars Robert Forster ("Jackie Brown") and Michael Michele ("ER") as two Wichita, Kan., police detectives who discover that Rader has resurfaced after almost 15 years and must be caught. Gregg Henry ("Ballistic: Ecks v. Sever") plays Rader, who last week was sentenced to 10 consecutive life terms.
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