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July 23, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Even in these days of twinkling superficiality, there are probably people around who think that a beat-up car and a tatty motel room in the desert are the height of romance. And if they have any sense of history, there are two dog-eared paperbacks in their glove compartment, Jack Kerouac's classic novel, "On the Road," and its photographic equivalent, "The Americans" by Robert Frank.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Forget the tree that fell in the forest with no one around to hear it. What if someone took more than 100,000 photographs over decades of shooting and absolutely no one was around to see them? And what if they turned out to be really, really good? That in a nutshell is the stranger-than-fiction tale behind the gripping documentary "Finding Vivian Maier," a film that asks a pair of equally involving questions: Exactly who was this hidden master and how did her work and her life finally come to light?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Right now, Robert Frank's extraordinary photographs are ubiquitous in Southern California. If ever there was an opportunity to get to know the brilliant work of the 71-year-old Swiss-born American artist--whose haunting photographic survey of our national life in the midst of the seemingly self-satisfied Eisenhower era stands as a turning point for photography and for America's self-perception--this is it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2011
MUSIC Foster the People Back in their hometown after a recent performance on "Saturday Night Live," frontman Mark Foster and his indie-pop accomplices — whom you might know from the radio earworm "Pumped Up Kicks" — head to the Wiltern for a night of synth-laced jams. The Wiltern, 3790 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. $19.50-$25. (213) 388-1400. http://www.wiltern.com. Paul Simon Entering his seventh decade as a performer, the legendary folk-rock pioneer is still going strong.
BOOKS
March 6, 1994 | Grover Lewis, Grover Lewis, author of "Academy All the Way," is at work on a memoir of Texas and San Francisco called "Goodbye If You Call That Gone."
Photography, goes one clear-eyed definition, is a record fixed on silver of the light waves reflected by or radiating from objects. The human eye, like the camera, can collect these rays, but it fixes them only in memory. Photography has advanced by now to the technological point where it occupies and "eyewitnesses" its own reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In making films, I continue to look around me, but I am no longer the solitary observer, turning away after the click of the shutter," photographer Robert Frank once wrote in a monograph of his work. "Instead, I'm trying to recapture what I saw, what I heard and what I feel. What I know!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In the introduction to Robert Frank's seminal photographic essay "The Americans," Jack Kerouac observed: "After seeing these pictures you end up finally not knowing anymore whether a jukebox is sadder than a coffin." Published in 1958, "The Americans" was Frank's first great achievement. A gravely beautiful cycle of 83 pictures shot during a two-year ramble around the United States that began in 1955, the work suggested ever so discreetly that all was not well in the land of the free.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Forget the tree that fell in the forest with no one around to hear it. What if someone took more than 100,000 photographs over decades of shooting and absolutely no one was around to see them? And what if they turned out to be really, really good? That in a nutshell is the stranger-than-fiction tale behind the gripping documentary "Finding Vivian Maier," a film that asks a pair of equally involving questions: Exactly who was this hidden master and how did her work and her life finally come to light?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | Gerald Peary
Robert Frank, who revolutionized the look of contemporary photography with his 1959 book of harsh 35-millimeter b&ws, "The Americans," didn't make the same splash with his first feature film, a candid backstage documentary on the Rolling Stones that disappeared quickly in 1972--along with its unprintable title. So how, 14 years later, was Frank able to get backing to direct his first dramatic feature, "There Ain't No Candy Mountain," which has just wrapped in his home territory of Novia Scotia?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Before he took up film making in the 1970s, Swiss photographer Robert Frank toured the States capturing the grittiness of the 1950s blue collar continent. With an outsider's clarity of vision his stark gray images captured sullen people and their hard surroundings and told stories of a nation. Work he did in Europe as well as America is a strong testament to the fact Frank could make one image speak volumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010
Arthur Mercante Referee in 100 world title fights Arthur Mercante, 90, a Hall of Fame boxing referee who was the third man in the ring for more than 100 world title fights, died Saturday at his home in Westbury, N.Y., said Edward Brophy, executive director of the International Boxing Hall of Fame. No cause of death was given. Mercante, who was born in 1920, began his career while serving in the Navy. He became a professional referee in 1954 and, six years later, was in the ring for his first world title fight when Floyd Patterson knocked out Ingemar Johansson at the Polo Grounds in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Steve Appleford, Appleford is a Los Angeles writer and photographer.
He was a foreigner with a camera, a young artist newly arrived on the streets of Manhattan from the Old World, muttering over and again, "What a town, what a town . . ." Robert Frank came from Switzerland in 1947, and he was in America to stay, eager to apply his ideas about art and photography and new ways of seeing. In a letter to his parents that first year, the photographer marveled: "Only the moment counts, nobody seems to care about what he'll do tomorrow. . . .
NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. criticized Congress while he was a Reagan administration lawyer, saying in documents released Wednesday that a congressman killed in connection with cult leader Jim Jones' massacre could be viewed as a "publicity hound" and that what Congress did best was "nothing." Those two documents were among 420 papers released by the National Archives that originally had been withheld from Congress for privacy and security reasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In the introduction to Robert Frank's seminal photographic essay "The Americans," Jack Kerouac observed: "After seeing these pictures you end up finally not knowing anymore whether a jukebox is sadder than a coffin." Published in 1958, "The Americans" was Frank's first great achievement. A gravely beautiful cycle of 83 pictures shot during a two-year ramble around the United States that began in 1955, the work suggested ever so discreetly that all was not well in the land of the free.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Right now, Robert Frank's extraordinary photographs are ubiquitous in Southern California. If ever there was an opportunity to get to know the brilliant work of the 71-year-old Swiss-born American artist--whose haunting photographic survey of our national life in the midst of the seemingly self-satisfied Eisenhower era stands as a turning point for photography and for America's self-perception--this is it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In making films, I continue to look around me, but I am no longer the solitary observer, turning away after the click of the shutter," photographer Robert Frank once wrote in a monograph of his work. "Instead, I'm trying to recapture what I saw, what I heard and what I feel. What I know!"
BOOKS
December 4, 1994 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Book Review and Calendar
The big news in photography this year is the Robert Frank retrospective that opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington on Oct. 2, and comes to the Lannan Foundation in March of 1996 at the conclusion of a five-venue world tour. Arguably the greatest photographer of the 20th Century, Frank is best known for "The Americans," his collection of documentary photography published in 1958, a gravely beautiful essay on America as seen through the eyes of an immigrant (Frank came to the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Being interviewed is a sort of reality therapy for photographer and avant-garde film maker Robert Frank. If you make a commercial film, you pay by being stuck in the spotlight. As co-director (with Rudy Wurlitzer) of "Candy Mountain"--opening today (see Michael Wilmington's review on page 27)--Frank has temporarily left the familiar world of underground film and come face to face with the foreign territory of the marketplace. "The truth comes back.
BOOKS
December 17, 1995 | Lester C. Thurow, Lester C. Thurow is Lemelson Professor of Economics and Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His book "The Future of Capitalism" is due out in spring
In America, earnings are being concentrated at the top of the earnings distribution chart at rates that have never before been seen. Among men, the top 1% has been getting about 70% of the country's total earnings gains. "The Winner Take All Society" attempts to explain why.
BOOKS
December 4, 1994 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Book Review and Calendar
The big news in photography this year is the Robert Frank retrospective that opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington on Oct. 2, and comes to the Lannan Foundation in March of 1996 at the conclusion of a five-venue world tour. Arguably the greatest photographer of the 20th Century, Frank is best known for "The Americans," his collection of documentary photography published in 1958, a gravely beautiful essay on America as seen through the eyes of an immigrant (Frank came to the U.S.
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