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Robert Freeman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001
Dr. Robert Mark Freeman, 86, a family physician who invented several marine autopilot and navigational devices, died Nov. 5 in Federal Way, Wash., of natural causes. Freeman, who ran the family autopilot business after his father died in 1966, held 10 patents, six assigned to the U.S. military and four involving automatic pilots and accessories. He received the National Marine Electronics Assn. Fessenden Award for outstanding contributions to marine electronics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 28, 2003
Re "Those Angels in White," your Dec. 23 editorial about the Gallup Poll on the most respected professions: I'm pleased that the nursing profession was rated the highest. It deserves it. I have been hospitalized several times and found it was the nurses, both registered and assistants, who made my recovery possible by their patience and concern. It is not surprising that the human services professions rate the highest and the business and political groups the lowest. Each profession earns its own rating.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 20, 2003
It is great to see Russell Johnson featured in the Home section ("Against All Elements," Nov. 13). He is a fine architect and a courageous innovator. In 1990, we had him design an addition to our home in Redondo Beach. We selected Russell principally because he proposed using then-new computer-aided design software, or CAD, for our project. At the time, I had been trying to find an architect who would be interested in learning to use CAD, which I had been trying to promote. Luckily, when I discovered Russell he was already using the software.
HOME & GARDEN
November 20, 2003
It is great to see Russell Johnson featured in the Home section ("Against All Elements," Nov. 13). He is a fine architect and a courageous innovator. In 1990, we had him design an addition to our home in Redondo Beach. We selected Russell principally because he proposed using then-new computer-aided design software, or CAD, for our project. At the time, I had been trying to find an architect who would be interested in learning to use CAD, which I had been trying to promote. Luckily, when I discovered Russell he was already using the software.
OPINION
December 28, 2003
Re "Those Angels in White," your Dec. 23 editorial about the Gallup Poll on the most respected professions: I'm pleased that the nursing profession was rated the highest. It deserves it. I have been hospitalized several times and found it was the nurses, both registered and assistants, who made my recovery possible by their patience and concern. It is not surprising that the human services professions rate the highest and the business and political groups the lowest. Each profession earns its own rating.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the most expensive insider-trading settlement by a major securities firm in Wall Street history, Kidder, Peabody & Co. said Thursday that it will pay $25.3 million in fines and penalties to settle federal charges that it profited from illegal trading based on tips from a top stock trader at another securities firm. The second firm, which was not named by the government, is understood to be Goldman, Sachs & Co., which has denied any involvement in the trading scheme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2007 | Sandy Banks
She doesn't talk much about her daughter these days. She's accepted the fact that Kristin is gone, that life goes on, that the answers she needs may never come. It's been five years since police showed up in the middle of the night to tell Patricia Strong-Fargas that her 22-year-old daughter, Kristin High, had drowned in high surf at Dockweiler State Beach. Police said it was an accidental drowning.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1985 | Associated Press
The richest of the rich in America is worth $2.8 billion, while the poorest of the rich checks in at a mere $150 million. But who's counting? Forbes magazine, that's who, and its 1985 list of the nation's 400 richest people is topped by Sam Moore Walton of Bentonville, Ark., who has made $2.8 billion through his Wal-Mart discount stores. Walton, who danced a hula on Wall Street last year when profit goals were met, replaced Gordon Getty, the front-runner for the past two years.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Freeman, the suspended superintendent of the Camp Hill, Pa., prison has been fired for his actions during a three-day riot last year that left 123 people injured and more than half the institution in ruins. The dismissals of Freeman and Robert Smith, the prison's deputy for operations, were based on a recommendation by Gov. Robert P. Casey, who said that Freeman was among the officials with primary responsibility for maintaining order.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001
Dr. Robert Mark Freeman, 86, a family physician who invented several marine autopilot and navigational devices, died Nov. 5 in Federal Way, Wash., of natural causes. Freeman, who ran the family autopilot business after his father died in 1966, held 10 patents, six assigned to the U.S. military and four involving automatic pilots and accessories. He received the National Marine Electronics Assn. Fessenden Award for outstanding contributions to marine electronics.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the most expensive insider-trading settlement by a major securities firm in Wall Street history, Kidder, Peabody & Co. said Thursday that it will pay $25.3 million in fines and penalties to settle federal charges that it profited from illegal trading based on tips from a top stock trader at another securities firm. The second firm, which was not named by the government, is understood to be Goldman, Sachs & Co., which has denied any involvement in the trading scheme.
NEWS
June 11, 1992
J. Stanley and Mary W. Johnson of Altadena recently donated $5 million to Occidental College to help convert the Robert Freeman College Union into a modernized student center. The project is estimated to cost $10 million. Stanley Johnson, an Occidental trustee since 1962, was elected an honorary life trustee in 1980. Now retired, Johnson was the founder and president of Holly Manufacturing in Pasadena.
NEWS
June 11, 1992
J. Stanley and Mary W. Johnson of Altadena recently donated $5 million to Occidental College to help convert the Robert Freeman College Union into a modernized student center. The project has an estimated cost of $10 million. Stanley Johnson, an Occidental trustee since 1962, was elected an honorary life trustee in 1980. Now retired, Johnson was the founder and president of Holly Manufacturing in Pasadena.
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