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Robert Frost

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November 10, 2009 | Robert Faggen
Despite his reputation as a public performer, the poet Robert Frost came uneasily both to readings and lectures of any kind. He was so nervous about public speaking that he once put stones in his shoes to distract him from stage fright; early on, he even had someone else read his poems for him. Decades and dozens of honorary degrees later, that nervousness seemed not to abandon him; he would often take a long drive with his friend, Edward Connery Lathem,...
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September 2, 2013 | By Robert Faggen
Thirty years ago, I became a graduate teaching fellow in a popular undergraduate course at Harvard University called Modern Anglo-Irish Poetry. What made it popular? The subject matter was certainly rich. But the professor, Seamus Heaney, was the special attraction. He was already a major figure in the poetic landscape; we watched him artfully mapping its peculiar geography. Heaney, who died Friday in Dublin at age 74, was powerful and widely read, receiving countless honors, including the Nobel Prize.
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NEWS
March 15, 2005
Regarding "A Stroll Through Nature's City" [March 8]: Here in Glassell Park, almost at Mt. Washington's peak, one can, in a minute, be enveloped in the urban or rustic that surrounds us. During my three running days a week, it takes even less time: the sudden appearance of a coyote, a glimpse of a soaring red-tail hawk, the clanking of a sanitation truck. I thought Robert Frost was the sine qua non of such writing until I experienced D.J. Waldie's paean. It washed over and surrounded me like a "friendly" tsunami.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2009 | Robert Faggen
Despite his reputation as a public performer, the poet Robert Frost came uneasily both to readings and lectures of any kind. He was so nervous about public speaking that he once put stones in his shoes to distract him from stage fright; early on, he even had someone else read his poems for him. Decades and dozens of honorary degrees later, that nervousness seemed not to abandon him; he would often take a long drive with his friend, Edward Connery Lathem,...
OPINION
January 20, 2009
'Power corrupts," John F. Kennedy observed, but "poetry cleanses." On Inauguration Day in 1961, Robert Frost shared the dais with Kennedy, Chief Justice Earl Warren and outgoing President Eisenhower to read a poem he had written for the occasion. It was a cold, bright day, and Frost, then 87, squinted in the glare. He struggled to read, then stopped, and instead recited from memory "The Gift Outright." Frost's unheard poem passed into history as one of his lesser works, yet it contains verses as apt today as they were nearly half a century ago. Herewith the closing lines of "Dedication -- For John F. Kennedy, His Inauguration": Some poor fool has been saying in his heart Glory is out of date in life and art. Our venture in revolution and outlawry Has justified itself in freedom's story Right down to now in glory upon glory.
BOOKS
July 25, 1999
Others taunt me with having knelt at well-curbs Always wrong to the light, so never seeing Deeper down in the well than where the water Gives me back in a shining surface picture Me myself in the summer heaven godlike Looking out of a wreath of fern and cloud puffs. Once, when trying with chin against a well-curb, I discerned, as I thought, beyond the picture, Through the picture, a something white, uncertain, Something more of the depths--and then I lost it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston has obtained the original version of the poem that Robert Frost prepared for the inauguration of John F. Kennedy but never read in its entirety because of the glare of the sun. At Kennedy's 1961 inauguration, Frost, who was 86 at the time, stood at the podium reading the beginning of "Dedication," a poem he wrote by hand then typed for easier reading at the inauguration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Burnshaw, a respected man of letters who wrote poetry, books and critical reviews; edited, published and translated literary works; and befriended such legendary poets as Robert Frost, has died. He was 99. Burnshaw died Friday on Martha's Vineyard, Mass., of unspecified causes. Sometimes seen as a defender or apologist for Frost, Burnshaw was well-known for editing and publishing the poet's works as well as writing "Robert Frost Himself," a biography published in 1986.
BOOKS
July 25, 1999 | BEN DOWNING, Ben Downing is the managing editor of Parnassus: Poetry in Review
Whether from heaven, hell or purgatory--his posthumous address remains in hot dispute--Robert Frost must be smiling his wry Yankee smile just now. Here it is almost two score years since he departed the field, and still we're taking his measure. The early, airbrushed view of him as rustic sage has largely given way to a new critical orthodoxy, according to which Frost is a "terrifying poet" (Lionel Trilling outed him as such in 1959).
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | THOMAS CURWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1946, Robert Frost was a forgotten poet. His earlier verse had been anthologized, his recent work criticized and the accolades that made him America's most popular poet were 10 years in coming. Dividing his time between Dartmouth and Boston, a vacation home in Florida and a farm in Ripton, Vt., the 72-year-old writer courted solitude and lived close to his own misfortune: the deaths of his wife, daughter and son.
OPINION
January 20, 2009
'Power corrupts," John F. Kennedy observed, but "poetry cleanses." On Inauguration Day in 1961, Robert Frost shared the dais with Kennedy, Chief Justice Earl Warren and outgoing President Eisenhower to read a poem he had written for the occasion. It was a cold, bright day, and Frost, then 87, squinted in the glare. He struggled to read, then stopped, and instead recited from memory "The Gift Outright." Frost's unheard poem passed into history as one of his lesser works, yet it contains verses as apt today as they were nearly half a century ago. Herewith the closing lines of "Dedication -- For John F. Kennedy, His Inauguration": Some poor fool has been saying in his heart Glory is out of date in life and art. Our venture in revolution and outlawry Has justified itself in freedom's story Right down to now in glory upon glory.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | John Curran, Associated Press
Call it poetic justice: More than two dozen young people who broke into Robert Frost's former home for a beer party and trashed the place are being required to take classes in his poetry as part of their punishment. Using "The Road Not Taken" as one jumping-off point, Frost biographer Jay Parini hopes to show the vandals the error of their ways -- and the redemptive power of poetry. Prosecutor John Quinn explained: "I guess I was thinking that if these teens had a better understanding of who Robert Frost was and his contribution to our society, that they would be more respectful of other people's property in the future and would also learn something from the experience."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2008 | John Curran, Associated Press
MIDDLEBURY, Vt. -- Call it poetic justice: More than two dozen young people who broke into Robert Frost's former home for a beer party and trashed the place are being required to take classes in his poetry as part of their punishment. Using "The Road Not Taken" and another poem as jumping-off points, Frost biographer Jay Parini hopes to show the vandals the error of their ways -- and the redemptive power of poetry.
BOOKS
March 4, 2007 | Meghan O'Rourke, Meghan O'Rourke is the literary editor of Slate and a poetry editor at the Paris Review. Her first book of poems, "Halflife," will be published this spring.
ROBERT FROST liked to compose his poems in an overstuffed blue chair that had no arms because, he told the Paris Review in 1960, it left him "the room he needed." This sentiment may seem curious to those who know Frost best as an uptight alternative to the radical modern experimentations of Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot.
NEWS
September 28, 2006 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
AN unpublished Robert Frost poem, a tribute to a friend killed during World War I, has been rediscovered and will appear next week in the fall issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review, the University of Virginia announced Wednesday. "War Thoughts at Home" first emerged in 1918 when Frost inscribed it in a copy of "North of Boston," his second collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston has obtained the original version of the poem that Robert Frost prepared for the inauguration of John F. Kennedy but never read in its entirety because of the glare of the sun. At Kennedy's 1961 inauguration, Frost, who was 86 at the time, stood at the podium reading the beginning of "Dedication," a poem he wrote by hand then typed for easier reading at the inauguration.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | John Curran, Associated Press
Call it poetic justice: More than two dozen young people who broke into Robert Frost's former home for a beer party and trashed the place are being required to take classes in his poetry as part of their punishment. Using "The Road Not Taken" as one jumping-off point, Frost biographer Jay Parini hopes to show the vandals the error of their ways -- and the redemptive power of poetry. Prosecutor John Quinn explained: "I guess I was thinking that if these teens had a better understanding of who Robert Frost was and his contribution to our society, that they would be more respectful of other people's property in the future and would also learn something from the experience."
BOOKS
March 4, 2007 | Meghan O'Rourke, Meghan O'Rourke is the literary editor of Slate and a poetry editor at the Paris Review. Her first book of poems, "Halflife," will be published this spring.
ROBERT FROST liked to compose his poems in an overstuffed blue chair that had no arms because, he told the Paris Review in 1960, it left him "the room he needed." This sentiment may seem curious to those who know Frost best as an uptight alternative to the radical modern experimentations of Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Burnshaw, a respected man of letters who wrote poetry, books and critical reviews; edited, published and translated literary works; and befriended such legendary poets as Robert Frost, has died. He was 99. Burnshaw died Friday on Martha's Vineyard, Mass., of unspecified causes. Sometimes seen as a defender or apologist for Frost, Burnshaw was well-known for editing and publishing the poet's works as well as writing "Robert Frost Himself," a biography published in 1986.
NEWS
March 15, 2005
Regarding "A Stroll Through Nature's City" [March 8]: Here in Glassell Park, almost at Mt. Washington's peak, one can, in a minute, be enveloped in the urban or rustic that surrounds us. During my three running days a week, it takes even less time: the sudden appearance of a coyote, a glimpse of a soaring red-tail hawk, the clanking of a sanitation truck. I thought Robert Frost was the sine qua non of such writing until I experienced D.J. Waldie's paean. It washed over and surrounded me like a "friendly" tsunami.
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