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Robert G Solomon

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BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can Bob Solomon find the next Garfield stick-on doll? Those faddish dolls, based on the cartoon cat, equipped with suction-cup limbs and plastered on thousands of motorists' car windows, have generated more than $50 million in sales for Dakin Inc., one of the nation's leading marketers of stuffed animals and other gifts. But the dolls also were among the last big hurrahs for Dakin, a San Francisco-based company.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can Bob Solomon find the next Garfield stick-on doll? Those faddish dolls, based on the cartoon cat, equipped with suction-cup limbs and plastered on thousands of motorists' car windows, have generated more than $50 million in sales for Dakin Inc., one of the nation's leading marketers of stuffed animals and other gifts. But the dolls also were among the last big hurrahs for Dakin, a San Francisco-based company.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Applause Inc.'s slogan this year is "Breakin' Away in '89," and Applause President Robert G. Solomon calls it a "battle cry" to motivate the company's 1,300 employees to sprint ahead of their competition. But Applause's race with its competitors this year may resemble a high hurdles contest more than a sprint. After three years in which it doubled in size, Applause is facing problems that could cause it to stumble if the company is not careful.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Applause Inc.'s slogan this year is "Breakin' Away in '89," and Applause President Robert G. Solomon calls it a "battle cry" to motivate the company's 1,300 employees to sprint ahead of their competition. But Applause's race with its competitors this year may resemble a high hurdles contest more than a sprint. After three years in which it doubled in size, Applause is facing problems that could cause it to stumble if the company is not careful.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Political fund-raising by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) fell by more than a third in the second half of 1989, when he came under fire for his efforts on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan, according to a report submitted to the Federal Election Commission. Cranston's report shows that in 1989 he raised a total of $910,141 for his 1992 Senate reelection campaign--$551,970 in the first half of the year and $358,171 in the second half.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
A kindly purple dinosaur, an asthmatic Chihuahua and a cat whose driving is a literal smash are helping to return a leading stuffed toy and gift company to plusher times. This menagerie is part of Dakin Inc.'s strategy to pull out of a deep slump and return to profitability. "There is a new spring in the step of the Dakin company," said Robert G. Solomon, Dakin's chairman and chief executive since he acquired a controlling interest in the firm a year ago.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Applause Inc.'s slogan this year is "Breakin' Away in '89," and Applause President Robert G. Solomon calls it a battle cry to motivate the company's 1,300 employees to sprint ahead of their competition. But Applause's race with its competitors this year may resemble a high hurdles contest more than a sprint. After three years in which it doubled in size, Applause is facing problems that could cause it to stumble if the company is not careful.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Christmas selling season in the homestretch, three local companies are crossing their fingers that they have correctly predicted consumers' spending plans. That's because for these companies, Christmas is not just the most wonderful time of year--it's the season on which much of their performance for the entire year rests. These are companies whose products are particularly in demand during the holidays, and they include THQ Inc., a Calabasas video-game concern; Right Start Inc.
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